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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Which is the better way to go? I've heard some say that you should never drop the hammer using the decocker on a PPK as it could damage the finely machined safety cylinder. Others say using the decocker is fine and won't hurt it. I say if one isn't supposed to use the decocker then why is it there?

Nevertheless, lowering the hammer manually by thumb isn't a problem for me as I'm used to doing that with my CZ-83 and I want to do what's best for my PPK. I've never really felt comfortable using decockers anyway.
 

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There's been argument about your topic here. It's probably better to capture the hammer and then apply the decocker.
There's a case to be made that the hammer hits the drum every time you fire the gun, but perhaps the firing pin cushions that against a primer.
As replacing a safety drum can be a pain, why take the chance?

Moon
 

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Is this an either or question?

I use the decocker but interject my thumb and slowly lower the hammer.
 

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If just lowering the hammer with your thumb, the hammer block does not get rotated. I'm guessing that if the hammer slips, for whatever reason, you could have a ND. I have always preferred to capture the hammer while using the decocker... Hammer block rotates into position and the hammer is lightly decocked.
 

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... It's probably better to capture the hammer and then apply the decocker.
...
That procedure is preferred, as it avoids having the hammer "snap" down unrestrained. It is fully described in most of the Interarms manuals for the Walther PP series pistols.

M
 

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I always keep my finger off the trigger, use the decocking feature of the slide mounted safety, and ease the hammer down after applying the decocker. Best of all worlds - no chance of ND, and no snapping down of hammer against the safety drum.
 

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And split your drum. Even the newer manuals say to work with lowing the hammer on the drum while applying the safety.
 

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No one is suggesting to not use the decocker; just capture the hammer before applying it.
Manually lowering the hammer on a live round is as risky as putting a 1911 in Condition 2 by doing the same thing.
Moon
 
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As long as you do not touch the trigger to lower the hammer, the hammer block will stay in the lower position to block the hammer even if your thumb slips off when guiding it down, but only after the safety is applied. The safety had to be done first because the disengagement of the hammer nose to the cocking piece does raise the cocking piece slightly and raises the block a bit. Apply the safety first, then lower the hammer holding on to it for the entire process. This will also lock the firing pin in the safety drum. Practice on empty chambers...repeat. Get a feel for it. Trigger is linked to the trigger bar that is linked to the cocking piece that is linked to the hammer block.
 

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Viper, I've done it so long that it is second nature. Even do it on an M9 or 39series Smith, or a P38.
But you've hit the nail squarely. Stay away from the trigger; let the decocker release the hammer, and ease it down. Easy peasy, and no oops. :eek:
Moon
 

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"Split the drum"??? Have you ever taken one apart? You should not ignore the voice of wisdom here.
Taken so many slides apart over the years for extractor cleaning/changing, FP spring cleaning/changing, indicator spring changing/cleaning, safety plunger sharpening. cracked drum replacing, etc.
Yes, I guess I have taken a slide apart.
Whenever I got a used Walther in, that is the 1st thing I look for to see the condition of the drum. Especially if the drum has the indexes that have deep round holes or shallow oblong slits for the plunger.
 

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Ok. A gun as a machine can have about any part break over time and I am sure lowering the hammer with the thumb will cause said part to last longer. It also seems like a dangerous practice. I question however if that part is "prone" to breaking. I have four such guns and have never had a problem. Admittedly I don't use the safety all that much during a shooting session. Just my two cents.
 

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Lowering via thumb "after" applying the safety will make it last as long as the hammer nose, cocking piece, trigger bar, etc. Hold hammer...apply safety fully...lower hammer....do not touch the trigger. Drum will lock the FP and keep it's end a millimeter or so below the drum.
Shooting, even though the hammer does hit the drum some, has the FP & spring & primer to cushion the blow. Mine has lasted for many years, but it is a machine and anything can fail like you said. Why accelerate the process?
And it is not a dangerous practice if followed this way and practiced several times until you are comfortable with it.
 
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