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Yes, it has a passive firing pin safety.
I field stripped two brand-new S&W Walther PPK/s pistols at a dealer's yesterday. Neither of them had a passive firing pin safety. Their safety arrangements appear to be identical to previous Walther and Interarms versions; i.e., they are equipped with an automatic hammer block (which is good for one or two severe blows) but the firing pin is locked only the manual safety is on.
 

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The firing pin in the PPK is inertial. Considering the mass of the firing pin itself, it would be hard for the thing to build up the momentum to fire a cartridge.

As it was mentioned, there is a hammer block. You can see it work by field stripping, and holding the hammer back while pulling the trigger. The little doodad on the right side of the frame moves out of the hammer's way as the trigger releases the sear and drops the hammer. If it doesn't move out of the way, the hammer cannot travel forward enough to strike the firing pin. Pretty cool!

-stunks
 

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"The firing pin in the PPK is inertial. Considering the mass of the firing pin itself, it would be hard for the thing to build up the momentum to fire a cartridge."

You may think that, but a few folks have learned the hard way that it should not be counted on. The only real protection against firing from drop-landing in all attitudes is to immobilize the firing pin by leaving the manual safety "on".
 

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"The firing pin in the PPK is inertial. Considering the mass of the firing pin itself, it would be hard for the thing to build up the momentum to fire a cartridge."

You may think that, but a few folks have learned the hard way that it should not be counted on. The only real protection against firing from drop-landing in all attitudes is to immobilize the firing pin by leaving the manual safety "on".
I'm actually in agreement with you here.

I meant that the odds of an accidental discharge via a muzzle landing would be low. The Makarov pistol, for example, has NO firing pin spring, and it takes a drop from about 6 or 7 feet, directly on the muzzle before the firing pin is able to ingite a primer. The PPK has a firing pin spring, which should require the firing pin to have even more momentum before it could touch off a primer.

Perhaps we should all be dilligent in not dropping our weapons, but I know there's always some unforseen circumstance. I, for one, switch the safety to ON when carrying my PPK/s in an ankle holster. Even with a thumb break, you never know... The key is to not take that weapon for granted. Be careful, be dilligent, be safe.

I still assert, the odds of this happening are slim, but to those who would rather be safe then sorry, I don't blame you.

-stunks
 
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