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Discussion Starter #1
Recently purchased my first firearm, CCP. First time at range, I put 100 rounds 115gr through it with flawless cycling. Subsequently, with use of snap caps, it locked up with slide in closed position, (with last dummy round jammed in chamber)... I managed to free it with sustained effort w/ mag removed.

Repeated efforts at dry-fire practice with snap caps had the same result. Sent it back to Walther, they turned it around quickly (and free, even the shipping) with a replaced striker spring.

So, ?

Faulty striker spring, causing lock-up?

--or--

Snap-caps caused lock-ups and damaged the spring?

Haven't had a chance to hit the range, and hesitate to use the dummies again in case they cause this problem.

What says the voice of experience?
 

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Welcome WayneJ.....the CCP is sorta new and we don't know everything about it yet. We do know that a number of pistols have locked up the slide, some while hand cycling, some while firing. The culprit seems to be perhaps, kinda, might be, could be....the firing pin safety under the slide. I'm not sure why snap caps would cause a problem with the slide or striker spring. The snap cap might jam but that would seem to only effect the snap cap. Retract the slide and knock it out. Remember this pistol has a gas port and piston. Make sure nothing is getting shaved off into that space. Welcome and keep us posted on how your shooting goes. Those snap caps aren't really good self defense ammo anyway....:D M1911
 

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...Those snap caps aren't really good self defense ammo anyway....:D M1911
Snap caps are an inducement to excessive kitchen-table manipulation and resultant oplohypochrondria.

Snap caps are of little value in real guns, though they have some application to Umarex confections.

M
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Snap Caps pt 2

Thanks, 1917-1911M.

MGMike, I have no idea what you're talkin' about. (Nah, actually I do, but since you're garrulous, cantankerous,and unreasonable, just tryin' to get a rise.) :)

Since I have zero experience & limited access to the range, I thought perhaps a little dry-fire "kitchen table manipulation" would be a good thing in getting a feel for the trigger, etc. It's my understanding that snap-caps protect the gun from dry-fire firing pin damage.

I found a video on YouTube showing how a guy had a similar problem: The action on his shotgun locked up while using a snap cap. He got a reply stating the following:

"...The browning uses a gas fed system, which acts as like an actuator slide instead of inertia. When the pin hits the cartridge the explosion causes a pressure build up and gasses. As the shot travels up the barrel these gases are diverted by gas ports into the slide underneath and therefore operating the mechanism. By using a snap cap. When firing you are not creating the necessary gases required for the gun to function properly."

So, is the system explained here comparable to the Walther SoftCoil gas-delayed blowback? And (even though a snap cap will protect the firing pin in dry fire) using one will cause this problem by not providing the mechanism what it needs to cycle properly?

What do you guys think?
 

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My CCP returned from the second trip to Walther today. First time the striker spring broke and the piston got welded to the bottom of the channel because of metal shavings from machining, second the trigger return spring broke. I like the ergonomics of this gun and hope it will not have problems anymore.
 

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Glocks....you didn't happen to take any pictures did you? Did the striker lock up or a gas piston? M1911
I have no pics but the jam was very difficult to undo; had to manipulate the slide until it let go. The shavings were welded in the bottom of the channel and the face of the plunger. Brass brush could not remove it. I had to use knife and needle file to get to the bottom to scrape it off. It never happened again so it must be metal left from machining. Yesterday I got pistol back from Walther and with new trigger return spring action was almost smooth with some light grittiness.
 

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I'm still not following you. Plunger? You have a slide and inside the slide is the striker assembly. This assembly is made up of the striker (firing pin), striker spring and rear catch components. The striker slides back and forth in the striker channel as it is cocked and released. The gas piston attaches to the muzzle end of the slide and is fitted into a cylinder under the barrel.

The trigger spring does consist of a plunger and spring. How about looking at the area you had to work on and see if it looks the same as when you sent it in or if more parts were reworked or replaced than stated. Thanks. M1911
 

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Cycling aluminum snap caps through the CCP will chew up the rims so they'll fail to extract and get jammed in the chamber. The same thing happens if you drop a snap cap in the chamber and let the slide slam closed.
 

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... What do you guys think?
No. The CCP isn't a gas recoil gun. The gas system on the CCP delays the inertia recoil until the bullet leaves the barrel. The gas system on the Browning Maxus (presumably what the YouTube comment is referring to) operates the action and drives the bolt rearward. Not sure why that matters when ejecting a snap cap...just pull back the bolt handle and cycle the action manually like when unloading an unshot shell. :confused:

Anyway, no need for snap caps in the CCP. The front face of the striker is plenty large enough to absorb the impact without damage.

Your striker spring must have gotten twisted or kinked somehow and jammed the slide.
 
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