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Discussion Starter #1
You may have read my previous post about my SOG P5 I recently purchased, and I was whining about the finish and excessive holster wear.  Well I came upon a method to use cold blueing that really works, and now I have a deep BLACK satin finish on my P5, and It looks Like NIB.  I will share this with my fellow Walther enthuasts.  If you are a collector that doesn't believe in altering the finish, then read no further.  But if you are like me and want your collectibles to look new then read on.  Of cours I would not do this to a war time p38 or ppk


You need:  Birchwood Casey cold blue from Walmart, don't buy the expensive stuff from Brownell, you won't need it.  A toaster oven, medium to fine steel wool.  And the secret ingredient, a Scotch pad you use to clean dishes with, the thin green ones you get at Walmart.

I did not remove any of the old blueing. I worked right over the top of the existing blueing.

First you use Alcohol and completely degrease the surfaces to be blued.  Then use the Sotch pad and lightly buff, always go in the direction the metal was originally worked.  Then set your oven to 200 degrees and put it in there so that it gets hot to the touch.  I don't know if it helps the blueing, but it will evaporate the water out later.

Now, take it out of the oven, be careful not to touch it with your skin, wear cotton gloves.  Pour a little Casey's cold blue in a saucer.  This is the important part.  Take a corner of the Scotch pad, dip it in the blueing and work in into the metal using light strokes going with the grain of the metal.  The pad removes microscopic metal and allows the blueing to work in nice and deep.  You get an immediate dark black color.  Keep working it in for a minute, then rinse with cold water.  Dry with a towel and take your steel wool and buff the metal until shiney or satiny.  You will need to do this whole process at least three times to get a good quality job.

When you are satisfied with the color, dry it really good and apply a generous amount of oil to stop the blueing process, and let that oil soak in for 24 hrs.

You don't need to strip the old blueing, since the process kind of does that anyhow with the Scotch pad.  Be careful if you are doing the barrel, it will rust the bore really quick, so when you are done get some patches with oil in there and clean the rusting out.  After all, blueing is a rusting process.

I would love to post some pics, but a am unable to do that.  If someone can post them for me, I can email them to you.  I wish I took a before picture, but I didn't.  Just imigane a P5 with alot of holster wear and a greyish, crappy finish with some scratches.  The difference is amazing.  They say cold blueing doesn't hold up as long as hot blueing, but the process is so easy it could be done once a year.  Why pay a couple hundred bucks and send it away for six months?
 

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Sounds like it worked out for you. That's great.

There are a lot of great DIY finishes out there, and most are pretty easy to apply. The trick is that the parts must first be fully and completely cleaned and degreased. I'm not confident in my abilities or equipment to perform that first, critical step, so that's why I use a smith for it.

Please report back to us in 6-12 months after using your P5 and let us know if the bluing holds up.
 

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If you have a personal server, you can upload your photos, and then link directly to the pictures within your post.

I'm interested in this product, but I would prefer a BLUE finish, rather than the black. Does this product come in different 'colors', or is it the black only?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It is actually Blue, I just meant it is a very dark finish. Some jobs I have attempted in the past came out more blue than black. The goal is a deep blue finish that looks almost black, which is what I finally acheived by applying it with the Scotch pad.

How do I get a personal server, I would be interested in investing in that so that I could post pics. I just don't know where to start.
 

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[b said:
Quote[/b] (banddr2 @ Nov. 29 2005,22:49)]How do I get a personal server, I would be interested in investing in that so that I could post pics.  I just don't know where to start.
Most ISPs provide a certain amount of personal web space for a modest site and some photos.  All you need to do is to inquire of your provider how to set it up, and get a few (free) tools to do it with.

For instance, SmartFTP is great for file transfers, and most of us already have MS Word or a web publishing tool of some sort like FrontPage. Once your photos are up on there, you can link to them directly, and they'll appear here.
 

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Best way to post pictures on a forum that I've found is at www.photobucket.com

Log on and create a free account.

Once you've done that, upload the picture/s you want to post from your PC to their server.

Then you copy the Img tag line that is shown beneath the thumbnail of the picture, completely, into your post, and the picture should then be viewable by all.

HTH,
Jeff
 

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Discussion Starter #7
OK, here are my pics, I hope it works. I may need to use brighter lighting when I take the picture, if so I will try again.



 

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You were correct - looks great!

Thanks for the pictures. Again, please report back to us in 6-12 months after using it, especially if you carry it concealed, to see how the cold bluing has held up.

Regards,
Jeff
 
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