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Just joined a gun club and my first time shooting in a few years. I grabbed the PPS M1 because I had yet to shoot it. Cleaned it two days before and struggled with the guide rod trying to figure whether it was in or not and how to get it in, etc. Anyway I thought it was figured out. I'm at the range and I load it, first shot - nothing, next trigger pull - the bang, then nothing. Dropped the mag and the bullet seemed stuck in the chamber which I finally got out. Tried to load a different mag and when I released the slide, it didn't seem to close right. Gave up and switched to my other guns, Berettas. Can anyone tell me what may be causing the issue?

Laura
 

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There is a small shelf that the nested recoil spring assembly sets upon on the underside of the barrel hood. Sometimes if you don’t get it JUST right, it doesn’t sit as it properly should and causes a fuss. I have the 40 S&W model, and the recoil spring is a bit stout to say the least, but you don’t have to compress it much to get it to click into place. Mine has gone BANG every single time I squeezed the trigger on her.

When you say the bullet was stuck in the chamber, was it the entire loaded round, or just the lead pill??? Also seems like it COULD be an obstruction in the firing pin channel. But you’d have to yank the slide back a bit to reset the sear. Another question I have for you, what kind of ammo were you using?? Steel case??? Aluminum case?? I have had notorious issues with these “budget” options and have kept mine to an all brass diet.

Steel cases sometimes have a lacquer coating to prevent rust and corrosion and when it heats up and just gets tacky or melts it sticks to the chamber walls and thus causes future chambering issues. Aluminum cases are so soft that sometimes they dent or kink and its a lost round.

Need a bit more information. I have to also assume that if you got the thing back together properly, it would function so far as to retract, grab a round, and start its forward movement as it normally should.
 

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It was Winchester white box ammo. I'm wondering how much of it may have been the recoil spring and the way I reassembled the gun. I'm a Beretta girl so it's a different gun to get used to breaking down to clean. I have been thinking of going for lessons and bringing the Walther along. I would like to know what was behind this...
 

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OP, what kind of beretta do you have that it is a new world of disassembly for you??

I guess there are dud rounds in every maker’s lines once in a blue moon. Yes, I agree with Jehzsa, glad you caught it when you did. Should you have ignited the primer and jammed a lead pill in the bore, and then tried it again, you’d be out a round and a pretty Walther.

Other option than all the great advice on here?? Call Walther service line. Their techs are good. I am sure they have heard just about everything under the sun with their products.

I can’t say I have noticed a bend in my RSA, but I also don’t have to compress it a whole lot when I reassemble. Whether that is a 40 cal thing versus the 9mm version, I don’t know. But I just drop the front end into the pocket in the slide, and then click it into place under the front shelf of the locking block as described. I do make it a point to try to not place it in rotationally the same every time so it evenly wears on the connecting surface.

Who knows, could have just been a dud and this is all overthought. Hope you get to bottom of it and its an easy fix. Welcome to world of Walther owners.
 

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Sorry for the bad impression but PPS does not behave this way at all. Its a pretty accurate shootable small gun. This was a range rental? My guess is its not been cleaned in a long time.
 

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Ohhhhh thats a good point. Nothing gums up the works like gunk.... in the works. Top Gear Top Tip of the day, compressed air (either in the can for cleaning computer keyboards or if you have a small compressor on hand) and the new cans of WD-40 with the smart spray straw. Soak, let it penetrate, and then short small blasts of air to blow the gunk out. Two stones, one bird, as WD is a good lubricant, but if left unattended can develop a bit of a stench.
 

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Ohhhhh thats a good point. Nothing gums up the works like gunk.... in the works. Top Gear Top Tip of the day, compressed air (either in the can for cleaning computer keyboards or if you have a small compressor on hand) and the new cans of WD-40 with the smart spray straw. Soak, let it penetrate, and then short small blasts of air to blow the gunk out. Two stones, one bird, as WD is a good lubricant, but if left unattended can develop a bit of a stench.
WD-40 is NOT a good lubricant. The WD stands foir water displacement. Lubricate the gun after using WD-40.
 

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I will concede, that stuff has a HORRID smell if it isn’t aired out well, or over used. They hose the students’ tools in it for summer and winter breaks to keep the water off of them, as its designed to do. Has a horrendous smell from sitting in the tool kits for a few months at a time with no air moving past them...

But you’re also right, not a great lubricant. I use it to surface grind aluminum, as it keeps the aluminum from galling up in the recesses of the grinding wheel. Other than that, yeah its not the best, I made a mistake saying that.
 
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