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As I've said before, I've been shooting about a yr...13mos. now. Usually shoot 6" targets at 8 yds.- normally pretty fair. Some days groups tighter than others, and almost always have a couple of fliers. At times, I'll go to 10 yds for last 5-7 shots....somedays not too bad (I count it ok if I hit the target at 10yds. Today I had a not great day...and when went to 10 yds was awful..very discouraging.


Although I am healthy and pretty strong, maybe my 76 (in 2mos.) yr. old eyes and hands have something to do with it?? Just doesn't seem like 2 more yds. would make that much difference
 

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Practice, practice, practice. My 15 yard shots now look like my 7.5 yard shots used to look like. Also, time to focus on what and how you CAN improve rather than hoping practice, practice, practice will fixed it eventually. I know that sounds like a contradiction, but there it is.

REALLY focus on technique, as in both eyes open, strong eye focused on the front sight, do make sure when you squeeze the trigger, the trigger is the ONLY thing that moves on that gun. Experiment with stances, make sure you do have that perfect high grip, strong thumb resting on top of weak thumb on the side of the slide.

Even shoes makes a difference. Do they let you plant your feet, or do you have to make an effort to stand still?
Shoulders squared, arms all the way forward, barrel forms one line with your strong arm?
Feet set about shoulder-wide apart? It's OK if your feet aren't perfectly parallel to each other, as long as they don't upset your arm geometry.
Knees can be slightly buckled, you're not standing at attention. Slightly lean forward. Here's where those decent shoes come into play that let you have a firm grip on the ground.

And for practice at home, tape a target to the wall, make sure your gun is unloaded, then make sure again, and then check it's unloaded, and practice dry firing at the target. Watch the front sight. The muzzle should not move at all when you pull the trigger.

Also, yes, 8.5 yards is my sweet spot also. Anything at that or less requires no effort to hit bullseye every time anymore. No challenge. Past that is where things require effort. ;)
 

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Dry fire! Dry fire and dry fire. Everyone is different. It’s hard to say what you are leaving on the table without watching you actually shoot.

Are your groups at least consistent?

Once you get to a distance where it becomes what I call “shoot and pray” it’s time to shoot at a closer distance.

Make sure your arms are extended and locked....both of them. You have a proper thumbs forward grip. Wrists locked. And develop a proper breathing pattern.
 

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You didn't say what you are shooting. If it is something with a fairly flat topped slide you can try the following. Get a snap cap for your caliber, put a quarter on the top of the slide just behind the front sights. Now practice until you can pull the trigger and the quarter remains on the slide.

Another way to detect muzzle movement during trigger pull is to buy a laser cartridge for you caliber, point the weapon towards a wall a watch the laser movement when you pull the trigger. Was it a small dot, or did the laser draw a happy face? :)

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_2_10?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=9+mm+laser+training+cartridge&sprefix=9+mm+laser%2Caps%2C245&crid=26WCEKNP57SB

The most expensive way to train for trigger control is with a training pistol (such as a S.I.R.T pistol) and appropriate software for your computer equipped with a web cam.

https://www.waltherforums.com/forum/free-range-time/65697-sharp-shooter-home-laser-shooting-range-review.html

https://nextleveltraining.com/

Pudge
 

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As I've said before, I've been shooting about a yr...13mos. now. Usually shoot 6" targets at 8 yds.- normally pretty fair. Some days groups tighter than others, and almost always have a couple of fliers. At times, I'll go to 10 yds for last 5-7 shots....somedays not too bad (I count it ok if I hit the target at 10yds. Today I had a not great day...and when went to 10 yds was awful..very discouraging.


Although I am healthy and pretty strong, maybe my 76 (in 2mos.) yr. old eyes and hands have something to do with it?? Just doesn't seem like 2 more yds. would make that much difference

In our gun club, we shoot very often at 8 yards, for basic training. No hurry, just trying to repeat hits.

In my opinion, slowing down is very important, just as important as grip, stance and trigger.

Of course eyes are a factor aswell, but at 10 yards, you shouldn`t much of a difference to 7 or 8 yards.

As you didn`t mention how you shoot and how your POI`s are, it`s a bit hard to give some effective and helping advice.

But what I do with new shooters in my club is:

#1 - Start at 7 yards
#2 - Show and help him/her with the right stance and grip
#3 - give 2 rounds (only with pistols) only so they get used to it
#4 - I stay next to/beuind the shooter and look for mistakes
#5 - explain what the mistakes are
#6 - correct the mistakes
#7 - slow the shooter down
Slowing down is very important. Take a shot, lower the firearm to 45° (approx) and relax. Take some deep breaths and then raise the firearm again and take the next shot.
Do this at every distance and mark/reember every shot and POI, so you can see, what went wrong.

When your POI´s get consistant you can start to speed up and you should get better every time.
 

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I have been a pistol coach in two gun clubs for a few decades and have found that every new shooter that came to our range profited from receiving instructions on the basics of pistol marksmanship and an analysis, and often correction, of his shooting technique.

If you want to shoot well, you will need to know the basics, besides having the physical abilities to incorporate them into your shooting.

This is a starting point:

The Encyclopedia of Bullseye Pistol
 

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The difference, two yards. Really shouldn't make a difference. Now the difference from eight lets say to 15 plus yards then the picture will change. but a majority of this has to do with shooting technique. The basics don't change. Grip, sighting, trigger pull, breathing etc. should remain the same at any distance. Now we can talk about vision, fatigue and add in the mind set that the longer shot is more difficult. Maybe change your routine. Start farther out and work your way in. This has shown in many shooters if you can hit the target at a greater distance, your confidence and comfort level will increase.
 

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All excellent advice. I have no problems shooting my .22 and having good groupings every time I shoot it. My CCP is another story. I started at 10 yards, bad idea. I anticipate just about every shot, and I rush myself. So, I’m going to back off to 3 and half yards and work my way up, and slow down. I also do a lot of dry fire practice. I use what’s called iTarget. Works really well for me. It works with my iPhone (but it will work with an Android too). It didn’t work as well to start with, the company had to send me a special end for the “bullet” to make it work in my CCP. I have it set up for 7 feet and will work my way up to 8 yards. Even makes the sound of shooting, just not as loud. Lots of practice, practice, practice.
 

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Hello, this is my first post.

What I do is aim the gun to the target, close my eyes and count to 5 while breathing normally, open my eyes and if the target moved to the left or right, I move my feet instead of just adjusting my upper body stance.

Without moving my feet, put the gun on the table, rest my arms for a bit, grip the gun making it comfortable and point it to the target with my eyes closed, if the sights are awfully aligned, I try a different grip, making it bigger or smaller usually make it better.

I have a big pencil eraser in my office that is big enough to place it in the hand recess between the thumb and the index finger, I use it to "exercise" the trigger finger, but not in strength, but just pressing the "trigger" when having the other fingers relaxed. I do this while on the phone.

During my shooting sessions, when I find that my groups starts to open, I stop shooting and look at the index and middle finger extended in front of my eyes and I normally see them shaking, I stop shooting, sometimes for 1/2 an hour until the shake stops. This happen to me sooner when shooting my Walther PPQ in 9 mm than my Ruger SR1911 in 45 ACP and usually does not happen when shooting my Single Action revolver in 45 Colt.

This is what I do when I'm not happy with my targets. If does not work improving my shooting "results", I stop shooting for the day and mingle with friends new and old. ALL my outing to the range are frustration free and enjoyable.
 

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While I agree difference between 8 and 10 yards should not show much difference in groupings with everything else being equal, things are not always equal.

Fatigue (mental or physical), distractions, or stress can make a big difference however and those factors can change in a very short period of time.

I would not worry about results during a particular day as most of us have better days and worse days with shooting results and don't let it get you down or discourage you! If you are not having fun then pack things up and save the ammo for another day.

Between range visits I like to dry fire at least once a week and IMO it does help me.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Pretty good at 10 yds

shooting my PPQ 4 really well today....sights lined up just right, steady on target, Pulling trigger straight back smoothly. decided to shoot last 7 shots at 10 yds.....hit target with all 7 in about a 4 inch group.


Guess some days you just shoot better than others...anyone else have thoughts. Guess everyone - except you guys who are always right on -are that way. I have days when things just seem right- and others when things don't feel just right
 
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