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Hi Guys,

I have heard that in some older guns, the "decocking" does not work & may actually discharge the round.

My question: Is there a procedure to check the decocking to insure that it works & will not discharge a loaded round?? I did not want to check it with a loaded round for obvious reasons.

thanks,
Bob
 

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On old pre world war II PPKs that have the 90 degree safety there is the possibility of the safety drum cracking which could cause the ppk to go full auto. Walther modified the design back in the 1930's to a 60 degree safety. This allowed the safety drum to have more metal and be less prone to cracking. I think the only concerns are on those old guns, however anything man creates can malfunction. That is why on any firearm you should only decock and engage safety with gun pointed in a safe direction.

I didn't answer your question, sorry. You could remove the safety lever and inspect it. You could also load it with one round at the range and point at the target and engage the safety. You can visually inspect the saftey drum by engaging the safety while you hold the hammer back, make sure the chamber is mt first. Just never engage the safety on a loaded ppk or other pistols when they are not pointed in a safe direction.

I have trained my self to hold the hammer back while engaging the safety, then lowering the hammer gently on the safety drum on ppks and pp's just to be safe, and I don't want to damage them because i am over protective of my babies.
 

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Decades ago my best pal and I both bought WW2 vintage P.38 Pistols.

We took them up in the hills for a shooting session. The old wardogs proved to be reliable and accurate. But when my pal pushed down on the lever to engage the slide safety, the hammer fell and "boom!" an uncomfortably large chunck of sod was blasted out of the ground a couple feet in front of his right shoe!!!

Not quite sure of what happened, we repeated the "accident" with the same result. As described above the drum on the safety had fractured and the P.38 was compromised. Replacement parts were easy to get and the pistol was soon restored to proper order.

Ever since then I too engage the safety lever and let the hammer down gently on my Walthers.
 

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Ever since then I too engage the safety lever and let the hammer down gently on my Walthers.
That is a wise policy on ANY hammer-fired pistol with a decocking lever, not just a Walther. Unfortunately the striker-fired P99 does not lend itself to that precaution, so you better be doubly sure the muzzle is pointed in a safe direction.

M
 

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a procedure to check the decocking
Coming up. But remember that if it works once, it doesn't mean that it will work forever.

Get a brand new pencil. Cock pistol. Rubber end first, stick pencil down the muzzle. Aim towards the ceiling. Engage decocker.

If pencil shoots up, decocker isn't working. If pencil doesn't move, it worked fine for that instance.

This is the way my decocker works. Grab gun in right hand. Point safely. With index finger and thumb of left hand grabbing onto the hammer, carefully lower the hammer. Should work just fine, until it slips.
 

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Always point it in a safe direction, including a special place in your home that you have for administrative loading and unloading of firearms.
 
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