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I have a CCP M2 with a defective trigger. I am experiencing grittiness and hesitation during the trigger pull. The hesitation appears intermittently, but it can be very noticeable and disruptive to the trigger stroke. I reviewed a YouTube video in which the author claimed Remington Dry lube improved the trigger pull on his CCP M2.

Alternatively, I could send it in to Walther to have their Gunsmithy take a look at the pistol.
 

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I have a CCP M2 with a defective trigger. I am experiencing grittiness and hesitation during the trigger pull. The hesitation appears intermittently, but it can be very noticeable and disruptive to the trigger stroke. I reviewed a YouTube video in which the author claimed Remington Dry lube improved the trigger pull on his CCP M2.
Did you try the lube suggestion? Your description is common and the methods to corret vary from one owner to another. You could call Ft Smith first and get their input. If you don't like what you hear you have these options:

1. Watch Ek's video describing the complete disassembly and polishing
procedure (
).

2, Contact a local gunsmith who works on smoothing troublesome triggers.

3. I used the following local (Tempe,AZ) gunsmith. I had performed my
own trigger job and got it much smoother but after Ft Smith returned
the CCP following their recall the trigger was very gritty and rough. The
Trigger Guy not only smoothed all grit and roughness out but the trigger
pull weight was reduced to 4.6lb.

The Trigger Guy
 

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Thank you for the comprehensive answer. The video makes it abundantly clear that quality of the finish on internal parts is the culprit. For that price point they can’t do it by hand, so unless Walther manufacturing can improve quality of manufactured parts, this pistol will not get better.

For now the factory has agreed to take a look at it and see if there is anything they can do. Looking at the Trigger Guy web site, I would say you lucked out having him local. The repair of the CCP trigger looks very labor intensive, what did he charge for repair of you CCP M2?
 

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For now the factory has agreed to take a look at it and see if there is anything they can do. Looking at the Trigger Guy web site, I would say you lucked out having him local. The repair of the CCP trigger looks very labor intensive, what did he charge for repair of you CCP M2?
I would be surprised if Ft Smith does anything to smooth the trigger but who knows.....they might surprise a number of us.

He did 3 trigger jobs and each was a different price. I believe the CCP was $110. Keep in mind that you can mail yours to him.
 

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A large part of the problem is the geometry of the system, specifically the small amt of leverage the trigger bar has when tasked with rotating the cylinder. Rough edges only make it worse. Even the trigger bar engagement against the sear in a P22 is an excellent design with a lot of trigger leverage. If I had one of these...I'd blow out the whole cylinder through the top with Gunscrubber while operating the trigger, then compressed air. Repeat. Then use a very light lubricant and blow most of that out.

If cleaning/lubing helps this issue.....how about filling the entire cylinder with grease, pack it in like we used to do when packing wheel bearings. Then, dirt couldn't get into the inner works. Wash and repack every 500 rounds or so. There probably should just be a grease zerk fitting installed on the side of the slide so a grease gun can be attached. Work on that one will you Mr. Chandler......:p 1917
 

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“Lifetime warranty” is your friend ;)
 

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There is a youtube video for the ccp trigger called butter smooth trigger fix and it works! I used it on mine and my trigger is a long very smooth pull!
 

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I have a CCP m2 which has the worst ever trigger I have experienced on any firearm. It is absolutely terrible with the grittiness, unexpected and inconsistent sear release as well as the inconsistent trigger press effort it exhibits. I started with the "butter smooth trigger fix" recommended by G.I. Shooter. It helped only a little bit. I then tried the take down and polishing video routine recommended by Chandler5566. That made it less gritty, but it still wasn't anywhere near a smooth trigger. The two above procedure reduced the grittiness by about half. Finally I used a lot of Rem Dri Lube and it gave me the best results. I didn't lube all of the points at once recommended in the above video, but did one spot sat a time to try to determine where the unwanted friction was occurring. It wasn't until I really hit the trigger bar with Dri Lube at the point where it makes contact with the protrusion on the cylinder that I got the best results. In total, the three things I tried turned a really terrible trigger in a much better but still not good trigger. The trigger press still has a gritty feel to it that requires varying pressure to press the trigger to the rear.The striker/sear release is predictable and consistent now which has improved my groups.


A word of warning. The above video does a nice job of explanation of the tear down of the system housing of the basic CCP. The M2 has an additional spring and bolt which powers the locking block release which may go flying when you remove the system housing from the frame. After take down I found an unknown spring and detent, which Walther calls a bolt, on the floor. I couldn't figure out where it went until I got an illustrated parts breakdown at the Walther website. To reassemble just push it into the hole while you are inserting the system housing back into the frame.
 

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Some of the so called grittiness comes from the polymer trigger rubbing on the polymer frame, when I had the trigger block out, I relieved some of the polymer material on the frame, where the trigger possibly rubs. This, and all the polishing, mentioned by others, has made a butter smooth trigger on mine.
 

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I've had the FCA apart before but didn't do much to it polishing wise. Might have to take a look at that guy's video and see what he suggests.

On a related note note, I did find that dry graphite lube makes a helluva difference. liquid lube turned my CCP's lousy trigger to unusable. dumped some dry-graphite in the exposed moving parts and now it really is buttery smooth. that it WAS bad clearly indicates the need for work but imagine cleaning up the mechanics AND better lube!
 

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I've had the FCA apart before but didn't do much to it polishing wise. Might have to take a look at that guy's video and see what he suggests.

On a related note note, I did find that dry graphite lube makes a helluva difference. liquid lube turned my CCP's lousy trigger to unusable. dumped some dry-graphite in the exposed moving parts and now it really is buttery smooth. that it WAS bad clearly indicates the need for work but imagine cleaning up the mechanics AND better lube!
Go on youtube and type in ccp butter smooth trigger and do what is suggested. I did and now mine is a long super smooth trigger. No need to disassemble polish graphite and all that other stuff!
 

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I have a CCP m2 which has the worst ever trigger I have experienced on any firearm. It is absolutely terrible with the grittiness, unexpected and inconsistent sear release as well as the inconsistent trigger press effort it exhibits. I started with the "butter smooth trigger fix" recommended by G.I. Shooter. It helped only a little bit. I then tried the take down and polishing video routine recommended by Chandler5566. That made it less gritty, but it still wasn't anywhere near a smooth trigger. The two above procedure reduced the grittiness by about half. Finally I used a lot of Rem Dri Lube and it gave me the best results. I didn't lube all of the points at once recommended in the above video, but did one spot sat a time to try to determine where the unwanted friction was occurring. It wasn't until I really hit the trigger bar with Dri Lube at the point where it makes contact with the protrusion on the cylinder that I got the best results. In total, the three things I tried turned a really terrible trigger in a much better but still not good trigger. The trigger press still has a gritty feel to it that requires varying pressure to press the trigger to the rear.The striker/sear release is predictable and consistent now which has improved my groups.


A word of warning. The above video does a nice job of explanation of the tear down of the system housing of the basic CCP. The M2 has an additional spring and bolt which powers the locking block release which may go flying when you remove the system housing from the frame. After take down I found an unknown spring and detent, which Walther calls a bolt, on the floor. I couldn't figure out where it went until I got an illustrated parts breakdown at the Walther website. To reassemble just push it into the hole while you are inserting the system housing back into the frame.
Update 5/2020

All of the tips and suggestions have been tried and the trigger still remains gritty. I give up. I bought this as a concealed carry piece for my wife, but with the crappy, gritty trigger I won't allow her to risk her life with this. With that lousy trigger it doesn't even make it suitable for a plinker. Wifey now has a reliable snubby 38. I got rid of the Walther and I feel I was really lucky to get 200 bucks for it. That was the first and last Walther I will ever own. German engineering? Highly over rated in this case..
 

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Mine was the exact thing until I watched the video, say on the couch and pulled and pulled the trigger while watching tv. Then I applied the spray that was recommended in the video and now it is extremely smooth. The long pull is by designed as it is a ccp, concealed carry pistol.
 

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I think a trigger job on one of these would be very easy. The parts are tiny...it isn't like you are going to have to polish on something large and for a lengthy time. You would need to be careful and neat with your work. I see no reason for needing any special jigs or guides. A careful assessment of all edges that rub against each other, some careful polishing and job finished. 1917
 
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