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You know, as often as I have seen this argument, I cannot understand it for the life of me.

Based on similar reasoning, there's no reason to own a 9mm.

.380 ACP pistols are generally smaller, lighter, easier to concealed carry, and in some cases are easier to rack the slide on or have less felt recoil.

If more power is deemed necessary, then there are firearms of similar (sometimes equal) size and weight in .40 S&W, which is a bigger, heavier bullet which delivers more energy compared to 9mm Luger. In addition, .40cal pistols are typically much cheaper than their 9mm counterparts ever since the FBI dropped the cartridge, and ammo is only marginally more expensive. Last but not least, modern .40cal pistols which have been designed specifically for the .40 S&W cartridge will hold up to a steady diet of ammo far better than a 9mm pistol will hold up to a steady diet of +P/NATO Spec ammo, and firearms which have been properly modified to handle .40 will hold up just as well as their 9mm counterparts.



The Hi-Point C9 is a straight blowback operated 9mm Pistol. Historically, the H&K VP70 was also straight blowback. It's entirely possible to make straight blowback 9mm pistols or even .40s/.45s, it simply isn't done very often because the weight of the slide and recoil spring have to be excessively heavy for it to function reliably.
There have also been many straight blowback operated SMGs, Carbines, and Rifles in the past as well.
it's true you can make blowback design in any caliber but why would you? As you said the weight of the slide and the spring strength would have to be enough to keep the slide in place until the bullet leaves the barrel. It can be dangerous if the slide begins to move back prematurely.
 

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Did I mention HiPoints are like an anvil with a grip? :eek:
Blowback carbines are a somewhat different matter; there is more room for the (still heavy) bolt to recoil, and springs to control it.
But locked breech pistols remain a better answer, even if there is more expense in their manufacture.
The package is part of the question. The .380 cartridge in a Glock 42 is not only less fussy to feed, due to lower slide velocity, but much more pleasant to shoot than the straight blowback Walther. The two are virtually identical in size, but the Glock is lighter.
Moon
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Rats, forgot to alert the group that part II is up:

https://wereratgames.azurewebsites.net/

(Same as before, just reposting the link. It’s still the free tier of Azure and takes a moment to spin itself up if nobody’s visited in a bit.)

I’d intended to focus on visualizations around firearm choice and barrel length and ended up learning something about the ammunition itself. Part III with more pretty graphs is nearly done too, and that one will get into barrels.
 

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Discussion Starter #24 (Edited)
1942bull,
Thanks. STB’s tests comprise about a third of my dataset and in fact he was a primary driver of the project.
His tests are well done but vary considerably from others’, and yet are cited (as by you) as if nobody else had ever put a .380 into gel.
In asking questions like “How did both Lucky Gunner and Ammo to Go get 12” out of a Critical Defense, but STB only gets that sad schoolteacher look of disappointment” I realized no one source or firearm test is definitive to show what a round does.
 

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This variation is among the reasons I like to chrono my own loads, or commercial loads in my own guns.
Doesn't get penetration data, but velocity tells quite a lot, as does consistency of loads, commercial or otherwise.

Moon
 
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