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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello friends,


I have a Manurhin PPK with black plastic grips from Walther here in the US.



I torqued the grip screw to 5 in-lbs. I'm wondering if this is too much torque and what the correct torque might be. What would be the symptoms of damaged grips from too much torque on the screw? I don't see any damage but heard a faint pop as I was tightening them.
 

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Welcome to the Forums...

Boy a good question to start your time here. I'm not sure the exact answer. I hand tighten my grip screws down to the point that they are tight but not overly so.

This is especially true with older grips that may have warped a bit. In fact I'll buy aftermarket grips if the OEM grips are especially nice (Grips4U spring to mind).

The faint popping sound you heard was likely the interior side molding moving against the frame of your weapon not (we hope) the screw breaking in the plastic.

My "rule of thumb" is tighten until firm and than another half turn. If the grips are warped replace them with aftermarket grips for range or carry use...

Again welcome and why not post some pictures of your Manurhin. They are great looking and shooting weapons.

Here are my Manurhin PPK/S (background) and Ranger PPK sporting Grips4U aftermarket grips:

 

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Because plastic grips seldom fit exactly and simultaneously flat on ALL bearing surfaces of the frame, and against each other, a lot of screw torque can be absorbed just straightening them out, so I am not sure that, even in today's specification-prone world, it's possible to adhere in a meaningful way to some specified torque value --even if one were prescribed. (I've never seen one for Walther grips.)

I have been tightening grips for about 60 years entirely by "feel" --somewhere between snug and firm, depending greatly on the design and material of the grips and of the gun, and how much support the grip has. In any case, just enough to keep them from shifting under recoil. Too tight and it may distort and crack the grip. On some, an obvious solution is blue loctite. On others, the better answer is to adjust the grip by removing or adding material to the underside; this is learned entirely by experience.

M
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I took the grips off last night and very carefully inspected them. I see no sign of damage at all, which is good. How are the escutcheons held in on grips like these? They're little metal squares with plastic molded around them?



I re-tightened them to 5 in-lbs and will hit the range again. I put a little white paint pen mark on the grip screw to observe whether or not it is rotating, although I've had that for a while and don't think there'll be an issue.



I'm kind of at a point where I'm just tying up loose ends in my collection and looking for things that might be wrong anywhere.
 

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Don't overthink Andrew'. Snug the screw 'just enough', and check it periodically.
As Mike noted, this isn't like torquing wheel bolts or head bolts; a specific value may not signify.
Moon
 

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I just use my fingers to tighten the grip screws until it feels snug. No need to torque down.

Carry a small swiss army knife on your keychain if anything gets loose a the range. I never had grip screws come loose.
 

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One caveat about Lock Tite...I was in the habit of using it on 1911 grip screws.
Sometimes it works too well, as the bushings come out with the screws when they are cranked out...and getting the screws out of the bushings at that point is a real stinker.
Moon
 

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1911 grip screw bushings = single use items 😉
I'd agree with you if they weren't such stinkers to peen in place...it seems less a problem in steel framed pistols.
Thankfully, they're the only real screws on a 1911.
Moon
 
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