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Discussion Starter #1
I clean my p99 after shooting it each time. However, as I'm pretty new to handguns, I'm doing what I THINK I'm supposed to do. I've looked but not found photos or good descriptions on what to do with each cleaning and for cleanings every 1000 rounds or so, especially with a p99, as I think it's simpler to do than a lot of handguns out there.

Does anyone know where detailed cleaning instructions are, or is anyone willing to put together some pics of a gun cleaning session? Or am I just the only one that isn't sure, and is just doing what seems to be the right thing?
 

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[b said:
Quote[/b] (Stoping Power @ June 29 2005,10:45)]it would be nice to see pics of cleaning step by step
Yes it would be very nice for one of the members that knows how to clean the Walther P99 post pictures of the process
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I reread my post and wanted to clarify... I don't clean after shooting my p99 each time... I clean after each shooting session... cleaning after shooting each time would make even one magazine take a LONG time!
 

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Does anyone have a proper guide as to how to clean the P99 properly?

Pictures of this?
 

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Cminohio,
You bring up an excellent point and excellent question. You would think something basic as this would be intuative, but I see lots of mistakes being made with people cleaning their Semi-auto's.

For instance- It is more dangerous to carry a "dry" weapon, than one that is dirty. Proper lubrication of the rails and other areas are terribly important.

I will try to write up a step by step procedure, but I don't know about posting photo's-- that would take up a whole lot of space. I will also include a "must" have list of cleaning supplies, as I see it -smile-.

Be advised---old timers and experienced gunners need not apply, this will be basic stuff for the new shooters. ( with some basic tricks of the trade thrown in )

Stay tuned....

JF
 

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I am so excited can't wait!



I hope you can post it sooner than later
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Sniper... Thanks a bunch. Photos would be nice, but I think I know enough now to figure out the text.
I use Tuff Glide, but am thinking about trying something like a dry lubricant. I'll look forward to reading what you post!
 

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Cleaning your Semi-Auto Pistol



First the list of cleaning supplies you should own to clean your beloved firearm.

1. Nitro Solvent ( I use Hoppe’s9 but any good grade will do )
2. Cleaning Patches- don’t skimp here, buy a good grade that doesn’t shred around the edges while your trying to use them.
3. Bore brushes—buy a good bronze brush ,along with a Nylon brush in the cal. You need
4. Patch cleaning utility tool- it is used to swab the bore with your patches, there are several different kinds—pick the one you like
5. Most important- A “firm” rated Toothbrush. Yeah, I know they make bronze and nylon brushes for that, but I like the toothbrush and I feel it works better—more on that later.
6. High grade Lubricant—don’t skimp here, buy the best you can find, I use “Break-Free” for rapid fire auto pistols. Holds up well under high heat.
7. “Gunslick” graphite lubricant for the rail system.
8. Gun cleaning Mat or you can use a large piece of that foam padding used to line cabinets in the kitchen or used to hold wood projects from moving while sanding on a flat workbench.
9. Bore Cleaning rod—I buy only Aluminum or Polymer ( plastic) Rods. It must be made of softer material than what your barrels are made of.
10. Last,-- some good lint free rags



Your work area: Must be well lit…….small problems can be caught during cleaning if you can see them , so pick a spot with LOTS of light. Lay out your cleaning Mat---this is where you will place “all” of your parts---so make sure you have adequate room. I was always taught that when you take apart any weapon—place the first piece you remove on the left side of your Mat. The second piece you remove goes to the right of this and so on and so fourth. In this way you will establish the ORDER in which these parts should be assembled. Just start at the right side of your Mat and work in reverse order --- back to the left. In this way you won’t forget which part goes back on the weapon in the proper order. Get in the habit of doing this no matter how simple the disassembly is.


Make sure your gun is unloaded before cleaning
“Check twice” !

Remove your EMPTY Magazine from the weapon—place it to the far left.
Cleaning the magazine is not necessary but every 1,000rds or so, depending on how dirty the ammo is you are using, but I will cover it here.

Using the appropriate tool –depress the small plunger inside the hole in the bottom of the floor plate. Next carefully slide the floor plate off the magazine body, holding pressure on the magazine spring as soon as it becomes visible. Failure to control the magazine spring will result in it flying across the room. Release the tension on the spring and allow it to come out of the magazine body. Take NOTE of the shape and direction the spring comes out of the body. It is extremely important the spring is returned in the same manner and direction. The plastic follower should come out with the spring, but if it does not simple turn the body over and allow gravity to force it out. You now have 4 pieces. Line them up-- Floor plate, first; Spring; Follower and Magazine Body –they will be reassembled in reverse order.
Wipe the inside of the Magazine body and clean the follower. Also wipe off the spring. DO NOT pull on the spring to adjust tension-ever! If tension becomes an issue –REPLACE the spring. IF the magazine malfunctions , the gun is “worthless”.
DO NOT use a lot of oil inside the magazine---you don’t want crude collecting on the spring and follower.


Next remove the Slide from the weapon
Remove the recoil spring and barrel.
Lay the recoil spring down next in line, followed by the barrel and then the slide.
Place the guns frame at the end of the line.

Now go back and using your lint free rags, dampened with some nitro solvent, wipe off each part.

After wiping off all the magazine parts—place a very light coat of oil on everything.
Very light……..remember we don’t want too much oil to attract grit. You can assemble the magazine now or wait until after everything is cleaned. I must emphasize the importance of putting the spring back correctly !!

Next the barrel:
Using the Nylon bore brush push the brush through the barrel( from the breach side) and out the front end. This will remove some of the large particles that you don’t want to smash into the barrels walls with the bronze brush. Next soak this nylon brush in the nitro solvent and again run it through the barrel as before. Do not change directions with this brush inside the barrel, always push it all the way out the front. Let the barrel soak for a few minutes, while we attack the slide.

Using the toothbrush (dry) brush all the areas of the slide. Make sure to get inside the rail system . Next using a rag soaked in nitro solvent wipe all areas on the slide. Next you can soak the toothbrush in solvent and use it to clean the rails thoroughly . Holding the slide with the firing pin facing down, scrub the face of the firing pin area.
Pay close attention to any build up that will occur “under” the extractor. The extractor is the hooked shaped claw on the side of the slide. Examine it for damage each time you clean your weapon. If needed—you may need a bronze brush to remove this build-up. I always hold the slide with firing pin facing down---so liquid and debris doesn’t flow into the firing pin hole.
After 5,000 rds or so you can remove the firing pin for cleaning an inspection, but I won’t cover that here. Dry the entire slide off. Then using you fingers , apply a coat of oil inside the slide walls ( three sides). Next take your “Gunslick” and apply a fine bead of graphite lubricant on the inside of both Rail channels—from front to back. Put the Slide down,………….and go back to the barrel.
Even after letting the barrel soak in the solvent for a few minutes—it will take over 24 hours for all the residue to work itself from the barrel surfaces. If I am shooting my gun more than once a month, I don’t worry about this residual residue. If you are going to store the gun for longer than a month, then I would go back a day later and re clean the barrel. Now using the bronze brush soaked in solvent –push it through the barrel several times. The dirtier your ammo, the more time it will take to get the barrel clean. You can hold the barrel with a piece of “white” paper at the breach…… and look down the barrel for any uneven look to the barrel walls ( I am not talking ,of course, about the lands and grooves) Any dull spots mean dirt, so keep cleaning. The white paper will help reflect light up into the barrel making it easier for you to see. After some brush cleaning , run a patch down the barrel to clear out the debris. Go back and fourth with the above procedures, until the patches come out relatively clean. When you think the barrel is clean, run a lightly Oiled patch down the barrel a few times to coat the surfaces. At this point you can reverse the direction of the patch inside the barrel and really scrub the walls down with the gun oil.
Now coat the outside of the barrel with some gun oil and re install it inside the slide with the recoil spring. Turning your attention to the frame. Using the now wet toothbrush----you can brush off all the small exposed springs in the trigger mechanism . This is where the toothbrush shines---it can clean the tiny springs without pulling on them. Clean all areas on the frame that shows signs of powder residue. The frame, because it is Polymer doesn’t require much work. After the frame is cleaned………take your “Gunslick” and place a small amount of the graphite lube on each of the four rails Guides.
Now you are ready to install the slide back on the weapon. After this is done, work the action manually to work the “Gunslick” into the rail channels. It will be necessary to remove some excess Gunslick that will protrude from the back of the gun. Wipe this off and generally wipe down the whole gun.

Your are done for basic cleaning. At certain intervals you may need to use a “copper” solvent inside your barrel. I like to use gunslick on the rails system, because nothing is more dangerous than allowing the semi-auto to become dry. The gunslick will continue to lubricate after extended periods because the graphite will work in a dry state, if necessary.
I hope I have covered the basics………others can jump in and add where I may have left out a step. JF.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
JF, thanks for the description... I've printed it off and will go through it the next time I clean. Everything I'd come across so far had assumed a certain level of knowledge, and though I'm not stupid, it's nice to have it just spelled out as a starting point.

Again, thanks for taking the time to write it down.
 

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sniper350, you said something in reference to the spring of the magainze on tension. I know you should not try to adjust the tension, nevertheless you said if you mess up with the magazine that the gun is worthless? Don't you mean the magazine?

Also when you were covering the cleaning of the barrel you said something about "soaking". Do you mean soaking in gun oil? Or Solvent? And if one of the two, then soak how, in a mini bucket?
 

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Thanks JF!

I am a little confused..."At this point you can reverse the direction of the patch inside the barrel and really scrub the walls down with the gun oil." Which was the last thing about the inside of the barrel.

Don't we want a completely dry barrel for shooting? Or was leaving a light coat of gun oil inside the barrel just for long term storage?
 

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Onebig,
Dry gun for shooting ?? I would never carry my gun CCW without it being protected.....it could be weeks before I shoot it at the Range and you "never" know when you may have to use it for protection. So drying out the barrel before pulling the trigger seems a bit impractical to me. The reason for "scrubbing" the barrel walls with the "final" patch is to force the gun oil as deep into the metal's pores as possible.
And at the same time reduce the amount of surface oil left behind.

Dry gun (barrel ) not me, ever----during our sniper training we were alaways allowed to fire one round down Range to heat the barrel and clean away any excessive oil, before the scoring rounds counted. So I don't recommend carry your weapon with a dry barrel---but that's just me, others may have a different opinion - smile-!

JF
 

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Mikep99,
The soaking I was refering to.....was allowing the wetted barrel to sit for a few minutes to allow the "solvent" to have the time to work. I do not clean my barrel by solvent immersion at every cleaning session. Maybe once a year---I will drop my barrel into the Jumbo bottle of Hoppes#9 and let it soak for a few hours. It is important, after this type of cleaning, to "re season" the barrel by scrubbing the inside well with a good grade gun oil. All or most of the oil locked inside the pores of the metal will have been wash out with immersion cleaning.

Yes I miss spoke about the gun being worthless..... I meant to say that during a magazine failure the gun can become inoperative.......and in effect ;become worthless in a gun battle to save your life.

Thanks.

JF
 

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Ok, well I did a teardown photo set which should cover most of the basics. I'll do a set of photos which will cover cleaning the gun properly next time I do a cleaning. I've only got about 250 rounds through it since the last time I cleaned it. In other news I put in a Glock Wolfee 4lb striker spring I picked up at the gun show today. I also picked up a pair of 15 round mags so next weekend I'll have to feed a few hundred rounds through it to make sure it works reliably. I'll clean it after that. In the mean time...


Once again, a big thanks to Nocturnal for hosting the photos.
 

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Sniper350, very nice step-by-step procedure. I noticed you only mentioned cleaning the trigger group of residue; nothing about lubrication. Something I've always wondered about with polymer guns is oil on the trigger group springs and moving parts. I've always let a drop of PermaLube or any teflon based oil fall on parts that move in and around the trigger. Do you think this is a bad idea? It always worked well with 1911s, but they were all metal. -Rick
 

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Rickoshay,
Thanks for the kind words:
Normally I use the wetted ( cleaning solvent-Hoppe's 9) toothbrush only ,to clean the trigger group . If you follow my steps the toothbrush will have already been prepared from cleaning of the Slide rails.

As you have pointed out, the frame that holds the trigger group is Polymer and requires no special lubrication. Only the small springs need to be kept clean and free of gum and powder residue. The nitro solvent I use ( Hoppe's 9 ) is also a rust preventative, so it can replace the use of oil in that respect. Check out a bottle and read their label. Because of the rust preventative, Hoppe's9 suggests that the last treatment of your gun barrel after cleaning can be the solvent only. I still, however, use a good grade gun oil. But I will trust them for the trigger group protection.

I don't think it would hurt to place a drop of oil on things every once and awhile, but I would not do that at every cleaning. Oil, unfortunately, attracts dirt and dust. Powder residue mixed with oil can become quite gummy if not removed each time. So there is a strong potential for over doing the lubrication of the trigger group---since you can't take it apart to get at the areas that are becoming gummy.
I should have added to my list of supplies......a can of compressed air ( Dust Off-brand name) Sorry for missing that.
I use that a lot to blow out any debris inside the trigger group.
Thanks to Rickoshay it is now added.

Metal framed guns have different needs......as there is greater potential for rust forming from humidity and body sweat if the weapon is CCW.

Hope that fills in any gaps.....thanks for the question

JF

PS: Great work by Toeball with the photo's !!!
 

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Okay here is my question. I always run a patch of nitro down the barrel and oil down the gun after every shooting session. However the number of rounds I fire during each session varies….so what is the approximate number of rounds that I fire after which I should take the pistol apart for a thorough cleaning. And I should I use a graphite lubricant on the rails and slide. Up until now I have only used a light coat of oil over the entire gun. Is the graphite really necessary?
 
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