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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've used bore snakes (pulling chamber to muzzle) and brushes/patches on short rods (pushing chamber to muzzle) but was was always looking for more effective method. Recently, I spent 5 bucks on a surplus post war German Army rifle cleaning kit because I wanted to try the cleaning chain. The chain, made for length of a rifle barrel, was way to long so I cut it in half. Now it's long enough that I can wrap the loose end around my hang before it pulling it through the barrel. What I've also found is:
-- I can pull much larger patches through the barrel with this short chain than I ever could pushing them with a cleaning rod.
-- I can still "hook on" a bush onto the "non-patch" end of the chain.
-- I can clean the bore much faster with this shorten rifle cleaning chain than I could with any other method.


Just passing on sometime that works for me on my PPK pistols. (I also just like using that old German Army cleaning chain.)

Again, 5 bucks.
 

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That is an interesting tool and method, but I have my own way that requires a few more steps, but since I get good results with it, I will stick with it. Here is my bore cleaning routine.

1. Coat a bore mop with CLP and saturate the barrel.
2. Let the soaked barrel sit for 5 minutes.
3. Wire brush the barrel.
4. Swab the barrel until clean and dry.
If the swatches do not come out clean, I repeat the process.
I do not oil the barrel once the swatches come out clean.

I had tried a bore snake some years ago. I seemed like a real shortcut. Yes, it was fast, but if dis not get the fowling out of th barrel like my method does so it went in the circular file.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Yes - a "Otis" version from 85 years ago. The WWII cleaning chain for the K98 came in a tin can the troops called a "tobacco tin." I would not cut one of those in half. The post war chain also has aluminum beads that protect the bore from the inner steel chain. The chain is still too long for a pistol after cutting it in half, but what's not in the bore is still long enough to get a good grip (with one wrap around the hand.) Again the chain lets one pull though bigger patches than you can push with a rod and I've found it's the bigger patches the really gets the job done faster for me.

5 bucks at my LGS/surplus store.
 

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I bought a modern Otis AR style kit some years ago and have found it useful for cleaning rifles and pistols. Cable for the long pulls, threaded rods for the short, t-handle for both, patch holder, brush, jag, etc. all in a zip up pouch. Ballistol, Shooters Choice grease, an occasional use of Ed’s Red or Kroil, and everything is clean enough for me.


gonzo, SoCenPA. "Before all else, be armed." --Niccolo Machiavelli
**ISO P.38 ac42 mag 4848b, PPK mag 285129K/2, Erfurt Luger mag 0253Q**
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Yes, those kits are very nice and work well. My son has one.

Think I just like using the (old) pull chain on the pistol better than other methods (and what I paid for it.) It came in a a small OD green plastic box which contained an oiler (that I've filled with ballistol) two brushes (for a ~ 308 cal rifle) and a small horse hair brush. I added a small screw driver. At the next big gun show, I'll try to hunt down some pistol brushes to use with the chain. If I can't find any, I'll just stick with patches. With the pull chain, I've found I can get very a clean bore just using large patches and ballistol. (I soak the bore with ballistol and let it drain, muzzle down, for a couple hours before I go to work on it with patches.)

It's a nice little kit I can throw in my range bag or glove box.
 

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The German post-war cleaning kits are a wide and interesting field. The pre-war RG34 was used in the first years after the war in West Germany and then changed for the G3 cleaning kit - after moving away from the G1 - in the plastic case and later for the G36 cleaning kit. East Germany had issued the smaller RG57 which first came in a grey soft case containing a cleaning rag and smaller black steel tin. The later versions were in a roll pouch and where termed RG57-5 and so on.

The RG34 and G3 cleaning kits were used for all hand weapons, excluding the RPG. The chain was just wound around the hand a few more turns to clean the pistol barrels. Even with the aluminium beads on the chain, it was important to have the flash suppressor in place to protect the muzzle of the rifles, the Mausers had a special muzzle device to protect it. I still have a dozen new German military brushes and occasionally use them together with the old Walther pistol cleaning rods but the best and most helpful accessory is the oil brush, IMHO. Instead of patches a pack of cotton strings were used.

In the early post-war RG34 you can see the Huelsenkopfwischer, the cleaning tool for the K98k.

 

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The strings are still used in the German military and Anschütz still sells a kit that uses them. The East German version that I got was grey instead of white.

They really do work well.

As to the article, that your link pointed me to.

"The Rg 34 was primarily used just for cleaning the barrel and not for an overall cleaning of the weapon The exception of this is the takedown tool, that was for use only with the k98 receiver. The instructions necessary to accomplish the general cleaning as well as information about assembly and dissasembly, care, lubrication, etc always were included within the specific manual to each model of weapon."

After giving the original of my HDV 257 ( Der Karabiner 98k und seine Handhabung) to a good friend, I am only left with a reprint. Apart from the sentimental b.s. of the author about slave labor, which was used by all nations during wartime, I haven't figured out which tool he is referring to as a takedown tool for the receiver. The Hülsenkopfwischer was to clean the grooves inside the receiver bridge and to open the bottom mag plate. The only real take down tool is the "Stempelplatte", which was later replaced with a simple hole through the buttplate.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
He might have used "receiver tool" tool in the context of when removing the floor plate one has better access to the k98 receiver group (short of detaching it and the barrel from the stock.)
 

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Wow. I'd seen those at gunshows, and wondered what the round thingies on the chain were for. Learn something new every day, no matter its utility. ;)

Personally, a rod long enough to clean from the chamber without whacking one's knuckles on the beavertail works for me.
Moon
 
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