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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello. I am new to the forum - in fact this is my 1st post. I bought a P1 from Dan's Ammo this past weekend. I posted on another forum for pertinent information that I should know about this pistol before shooting it. (This is my first P1). I got the following response:

"Do not remove the slide cover unless you have NO choice. It's easy to spring or mis-assemble, and will blow off, scattering parts."


My question in regards to this response is how do I field-strip and clean this part of the pistol?

Thanks in advance for your help.
 

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You don't "field-strip" the slide cover, and it's unnecessary for routine cleaning. (Field-stripping results in only four assemblies: barrel, slide, frame and magazine.)

Removal of the slide cover is a workbench operation, best avoided unless you HAVE to do it, or are just curious to do it once--and thereafter leave it alone.

M
 

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By 'slide cover ' I assume you mean the internal housing for the firing pin mechanism. That is very tricky on a lot of pistols. I have not taken mine down that far and hope I will not need to. To fieldstrip for general cleaning and lubrication it should be enough to remove the slide and barrel assembly then remove the barrel and lock from the slide. You can remove the lock and reassemble it by manipulating the plunger. The barrel slips back into the slide when you lift the lock up slightly. You probably want to change the recoil springs with new Wolff gunsprings depending how old it is and how much it has been fired. To reassemble the barrel-receiver assembly to the frame you push the lock back into place while pressing the hook inside the frame as you slide the the whole thing back together against the recoil springg tension and swing the takedown lever back into place. But you probably have already figured all this out.:D

Happy shooting,

Russell
 

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. You probably want to change the recoil springs with new Wolff gunsprings depending how old it is and how much it has been fired. Russell
Welcome to the forum.

Russell is correct in that you should evaluate the condition of the springs of your new-to-you P1. But note that there seems to be some debate as to whether swapping out the springs should be mandatory, as many people believe and strongly advocate. Some folks who shoot the P1 (and the P38) a great deal maintain that it is essential to change the springs before your first trip to the range. Others disagree and can see no appreciable advantage or difference in the performance of guns that are updated with new springs and guns that are not.

I recently swapped out the springs on a P1 shooter that I, too, got from Dan's Ammo (great guns, in great condition, at great prices, I might add), even though the local gunsmith who evaluated it said that it was a waste of time and money. My gun dated to 1977, but the condition of the original springs was -- in the smithy's opinion, at least -- perfect. I also couldn't detect any difference in the performance of the gun before or after the swap. (I did it mainly to stop the brass from flying directly into my face or on top of my head, a somewhat common condition with the P1. After a couple of fine-tunings by the smithy, the gun is now ejecting its spent brass back and to the left -- just as advertised.)

Some folks also maintain that you should not under any circumstances get the updated, extra-power recoil springs that Wolf sells for the P1 and the P38; these folks believe that the more-powerful springs cause too much of a slamming action and will crack or otherwise damage the alloy frame and other goodies. Conversely, there seems to be an equal number of folks who believe strongly in the exact opposite opinion. Everyone's an expert, in other words.

If you check out the discussion on P1 shooters on the P38 forum,

http://www.p38forum.com/

you'll get as much as you want on the topic (look in the Post-War P38 section). Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks to all for your helpful replies. I think that I had my parts nominclature in the gentleman's initial reply very wrong. By the term "slide cover" I assumed that he meant the slide. I believe you all have got me turned around in the right direction.:) Several times I stripped the pistol down to the four essential parts that you have mentioned. I had no trouble getting everything back together so I kept asking myself what am I doing wrong that this is so easy?! I have no plans to break down the pistol any further. If need be, I can always shoot a little Powder Blast down in there to get out most of any accumulated crud.

I hope you don't mind, but one other question please. With the matte finish on both the exterior and interior of the slide, should I shoot the gun "wetter" than I do with the other guns in my collection (Sigs, Beretta's, etc.)?

Thanks again for all the help and I am looking forward to getting the P1 to the range this weekend and get to know it!

Frank
 

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I recently swapped out the springs on a P1 shooter...even though the local gunsmith who evaluated it said that it was a waste of time and money. My gun dated to 1977, but the condition of the original springs was -- in the smithy's opinion, at least -- perfect. I also couldn't detect any difference in the performance of the gun before or after the swap. (


Since this subject is bound to provoke a big squabble and hijack Highrider's thread (which asked about slide covers, and has nothing at all to do with recoil springs), I will toss in two cents in a separate thread.

But just for the moment: Your gunsmith was right.

M
 
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