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Mike, concur and point taken on guns shipped in plastic, tho' I suspect the bags are factory sealed in a very dry environment.
Frankly, I like to handle the stuff in my little collection, and the rug thing has worked very well in that context. Blued guns get wiped with a silicone rag; stainless guns just go back in the rug. I do have a Goldenrod and an hygrometer, and humidity levels are kept in check.
Hate to think of storing away something so carefully that it is a major event just having a look at it. That said, nothing I've got is of great antiquity nor value.
I also tend to shoot what I've got, and it often gets put away dirty...if I cleaned it, then it wouldn't get shot again.
Thus far, nothing has rusted or been damaged by my not terribly fussy system
I have no idea what Tanfoglio does with his guns after he buys them and shows them off....!
Moon
 

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The rust proofing I was talking about is Boeshield T-9. I first saw it written up in a good gun mag & Boeshield rated by far the best of all the gun rust proofings. I just use it on my blued guns when they are going to sit. I also put them in a treated gun sock about like Moon does & also in a plastic bag .

Mike what did you mean first when you said baggy , did you not mean ziplock? Also Mike ,I know I will hear back from you on this, what do you know or think about Frog Lube? I ordered some the other day both in paste & liquid. It was supposed to have been developed by the Seals. It is non oil based & is made from plants & is really given super write ups as being the best lubricant & rust proofing of all.

I thought it might make a gun (PPK) easier to rack. It was developed by one of the lead seals & did have excellent feedback.
 

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By the way Moon, my brother let my PPK sit in a leather holster for a long time & rusted the barrel . He had another gun a Berretta in a gun rug for maybe 20 years and it came out perfect. I guess your gun rugs are great. He died 2 years ago, so I can't get on him about it. He was a WW2 combat vet , but not a gun person. He liked to shoot but probably never cleaned one.
 

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A neighbor brought over his WWII Vet 1911A1 that had been in his Dad's trunk since 1950 or so. It was in the original brown Boyd's Leather holster along with three canvas ammo pouches of WWII magazines loaded with steel cased GI ammo.

What a piece of history. The pistol itself showed no signs of rust from being in that leather holster for the last 70 years. The canvas ammo pouches were green around the brass "Lift-A-Dot" snaps with crystallized copper salts. The copper bullets were very dark brown, the steel cases dark gray, with no signs of rust or corrosion.

So, all the metal was in great shape except for the snaps on the mag pouches.

The GI trunk was in an attic in Portland Oregon for the last half century, undisturbed.

Not ideal storage conditions. It rains a lot here. Attics are vented, cold, and humid most of the year, dry and HOT in the summer.

I have no idea how this dead Marine prepared his pistol for storage after the war, but I would bet that it was cleaned, like Marines do, oiled with "gun oil" and put in the trunk with the war memorabilia that is too painful to drag out.

A commercial pre-war Walther polished blue finish might not endure this abuse as well as a wartime Parkerized 1911A1.
 

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After I'm done cleaning my guns after a day at the range, I wipe them down with a cloth sprayed with my favorite snake oil, then wipe the oil "off" with a clean rag. I then put them into a Ziploc heavy-duty freezer bag (with the double locks). I keep five or six silica gel desiccant packs in each bag, and use a straw to suck 99% of the air out of the bag before zipping it shut good and tight. The Walthers then go into their foam-lined plastic totes and into the safe. There's a damp-rid moisture absorber in the safe as well for backup.

The thing to keep in mind is if the pistol is sealed inside a plastic bag, condensation from temperature swings will not be a problem. The moisture will merely condense upon the outer surface of the bag and not upon the pistol cocooned within. Think about it: condensation that accretes on objects whose temperature is at or below the local dewpoint comes from the surrounding atmosphere. As the atmosphere inside a properly sealed bag has a controlled (and fixed) humidity content, it is only these water vapor molecules that can possibly condense upon the firearm. By adding a desiccant to this tiny enclosed world, you wick up most of the remaining tendrils of water vapor.

Of course, we all neglect to consider the real enemy of iron... oxygen. It is oxygen that is the "O" in Fe2O3, more commonly known as rust. Oxygen will forever attempt to bind with iron at the molecular level, so logic dictates that we must remove oxygen from the equation. And how is this best done?

Leave a thin film of your favorite snake oil on your Walther before you put it to bed. Don't slick it down with grease like a green pepper from the grocery store; less is more. So long as there's a barrier between the iron of your pistol and the roaming oxygen molecules of our planet, your pistol will far outlive you.

-Pilotsteve
 

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The bottom line here is that however you protect your PPK it's the best care it's gotten since 1941. Enjoy it!
 

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...

I also tend to shoot what I've got, and it often gets put away dirty...if I cleaned it, then it wouldn't get shot again.
...
Moon, that should be engraved on a wall plaque.

I will reduce it to an axiom: Fastidious cleaning is the enemy of frequent shooting.

All the time spent in the workshop compulsively nit-picking every smudge of firing residue might better be spent on the range, pulling the trigger. Disassembly and meticulous cleaning after every firing session is a waste of time, and discourages getting it dirty again. Unless I am using corrosive-primed ammunition, I seldom bother with the bore.

A quick wipedown with a RIG rag outside, a couple strokes over the breech face with a GI "toothbrush" and the twirl of a bronze brush in the chamber is all that my guns get --until they get really, really dirty.

M


P.S. Benign neglect also tends to keep guns intact and undamaged. Have you noticed that the vast majority of posts we see here where somebody broke something or lost a spring, etc. occurred not while shooting, but while "cleaning" ?
 

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Mike, I knew with the frog opening I would get something like that back. Maybe if you would get a frog gig you would be able to lube your guns better.

The stuff is really supposed to be good.
 

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'Fastidious cleaning is the enemy of frequent shooting' would indeed a wall plaque make, Mike.
Along with its brethren, 'If it ain't broke, don't, er, fool with it'.

No frogs were harmed in the making of this post.
Moon
 

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That Ruger revo that was holster stored and that I referenced earlier; it wasn't in the holster for more than a year, and the rust was so deep that I used a bench grinder to remove it, and then somewhat smoothed the damage with a wire wheel.
The damage was truly cosmetic, and it was one of the old, Bill Ruger era guns that were made twice as strong as need be, plus 10%, so there was no real harm beyond making the gun pretty fugly.
Moon
 

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OK Mike & Moon, I got the Frog Lube & it is great. If nothing else it is super to work with. It has a mint oder & is edible in case Mike gets hungry.

Really the stuff seems great & you wash your gun with alchol to rid it of oil & then put this on heating it up slightly with a dryer. It did slick up my PPK & a new Shield I bought, Look it up on the net , you will do yourself s favor. A lot of the guys on the S&W forum use it & thats where I heard about it. Now if you two would like to come to dinner-----

Fresh caught Frog delight in super slick gravy.
 

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Thanks for the offer, gene, but frog isn't quite close enough to seafood for my taste...

Back to the OP's question; can we all agree to a distinction between really long term preservation of what are almost museum pieces and short term storage of guns that may see frequent use or handling?
Can we also agree that the two biggest culprits in gun rust/corrosion are moisture and anything that attracts or traps moisture; aka, sweat, salt, holsters?
To be avoided are damp environs and big temperature swings?
To be used is some form of lube which also acts as an oxygen/moisture block, and some wiping procedure that removes fingerprints and moisture?
Moon
 

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Mike, I knew with the frog opening I would get something like that back. Maybe if you would get a frog gig you would be able to lube your guns better.

The stuff is really supposed to be good.

Oh, you mean that it's the GUNS that get lubed!!!

No wonder I was having so much trouble.

M
 

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I just watched Sootch's shameless commercial of this Froglube goop on their website. I must say, it appears to be the newest, bestest snake-oil out there! I might give it a whirl as it can't hurt to switch colognes every once in a while. Plus I can brush my teeth with it before I go to bed! Try that with Hoppes.

-Pilotsteve
 

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If I wasn't in love with my wife, I'd set my sights on the first woman I encountered who was wearing Hoppes as cologne....
Don't be dissing Hoppes, Steve!
I'm actually using the same oil that we put in the crankcase of the Panzer (5w-40) as gun lube in about anything these days, and still using that storied Hoppes for cleaning.
The wiping rag gets a dose of silicone spray, and the rag itself gets replaced fairly frequently. They tend to acquire abrasive grit that does gun finishes no favors.
I'm to the age where I see little harm being set in my ways.
Moon
 

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If I wasn't in love with my wife, I'd set my sights on the first woman I encountered who was wearing Hoppes as cologne....
Don't be dissing Hoppes, Steve!
Funny you say that, ½Moon. One of the ladies who helps out in my office was telling me how she loves the smell of Hoppes when her husband cleans his rifle during hunting season. I have ghastly visual images of her getting all worked up 'n bothered around the corner in the kitchen... the vapors from the orange and yellow bottle wafting in the air from the next room. Them's manly smells there, or so I'm led to believe.

-Pilotsteve
 

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Steve, that is a mind movie....

When I clean guns with the stuff, I don't throw out the patches in the trashcan here in the shop any sooner than I have too, so the odor can permeate the room.
It's funny how you have pleasant associations with certain smells. I like a train almost as well as I like guns, and the smell of creosote from the ties has always made me smile.
We can only hope our fearless leader isn't ordering the training of Hoppes-sniffing dogs for the BATF, or whatever other jack-booted thugs he'd like to send to collect our guns.
So ya' know, I buy my Hoppes in the quart size...
Moon
 

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Despite a wee bit of wandering, there is indeed good stuff in there. Good call, Searcher.
Moon
 
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