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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What’s everyone use for cleaning and lube for the stainless? I was thinking of using Eezox on it. It’s a dry lube and I think it cleans as good as Hoppe‘s #9. I saw in another post someone used a grease on the slide. Seecamp recommends Eezox and they’re all stainless, but on my other guns it’s Hoppes, then a wipe down with CLP and a drop of oil here and there. Only a few hundred rounds and I’m already seeing marks on the outside of the chamber through the .380 stamp.
 

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I am a fan of Hoppe’s for cleaning and Hoppe’s Benchrest for lube. A really thin grease is great to prevent galling, but might I suggest you remain vigilant with greases. They are obviously thicker than oils, and remain on surfaces longer than oils. This can lead to the collection of debris and damaging gunk. Same as over-oiling.

When I was at my last job, we had a water jet machine, and all of the fittings are Stainless Steel, and to keep the galling away, we used the factory “blue lube” that would ball up and acted like an anti-seize. But, it is thick as pig dirt, and while it would be great for gliding, it would gunk the pistol up pretty quick. Also would be a mess. A drop the size of the head of a Q-tip would coat the entire pistol inside AND out.

Short story long. Hoppe’s Bench Rest with the additives in it that make it a bit of a thicker oil than standard orange bottle oil.
 

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The user manual calls for a "good powder-removing solvent" and "high quality firearm oil".

I prefer to use Safariland Break Free foaming spray-can aersol CLP (Cleaning, Lubricant Preservative) for cleaning and Safariland Break Free squirt bottle liquid LP (Lubricant, Preservative) for lubrication.

I wouldn't object to putting just a tiny bit of generic hi-temp grease on the frame rails but it's really not necessary if the gun is clean and well oiled.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
I’ll have to give the thicker oil a try. I tend to keep them spotless. Always a good idea to take the pocket gun out and go through it every few months. Peace of mind. @Angry Hippo I had some of that foaming break free. I need to find some more. The CLP I have now is a squirt bottle and I’m not crazy for it.
 

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I purchased a seized up rusted solid blued CZ 75 at a farm auction one time for a project. Used PB blaster to get it apart, that stuff worked REALLY well about getting all the foreign gunk out. Let it sit for a few hours and sprayed a fresh coat in once every hour. Rubber hammer and padded vice jaws, and it came right apart. I even used PB on a really caked up AR that had the powder residue dry and kind of harden up. But I would not use it as the lube, even though it cleaned it up like no other solvent I have ever used.

I was at a LGS the other day, and they had a rep there from Tetra Gun oil products. I wasn’t sold on their solvent yet, as I am still loyal to Hoppe’s 9. But the oil is better, IMHO, as they gave me a trial tube of it, and I used it on my target 1911. It is the only one I will use now. That is hard for me to say. But I will be buying Tetra oil from here on out. LGS has it for same price or very close to Hoppe’s orange bottled stuff. Seems to really stick to the stainless of my Kimber much better, too. Doesn’t ooze out after a shot or two heating it up.
 

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What’s everyone use for cleaning and lube for the stainless?
I clean with 99% isopropyl alcohol using Hoppe's for the bore. Break-Free CLP is my gun oil. When I feel the need to use grease I use Lubriplate.

I have noticed that my P5 and P38 slides operate smoother when greased but this has not been the case with all of my pistols and never on any of my stainless pistols. I've never tried grease on a PP/PPK.

Only a few hundred rounds and I’m already seeing marks on the outside of the chamber through the .380 stamp.
That kind of wear is inevitable. It's the price to be paid for enjoying your Walther.
 

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No need to overthink this. Have a long history with stainless guns, Smith revos, Colt 1911s, and PPKs. Really not different than blued guns. S&W figured out the magic of making the alloys slightly different to avoid galling.
Hoppes 9 for cleaning; it works and smells great. And the dirt is easier to spot on stainless.
For lube, the same oil that goes in the Bimmer's sump works just fine. Every now and again, I'll use a little LSA on the rails.
Keep it relatively clean and lubed, you'll be fine.
Moon
ETA- Redcat is exactly right; some scuffs on the moving parts are part of how an auto works.
M
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Sterg - maybe provide a picture of the wear you're seeing. Some wear marks are normal, others are not.
There’s a line forming under the .380. Looking at the inside of the slide, there’s a small step where the inside transitions into the top radius. Looking at photos of old ones and that part with the stamps looks clean.
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Yes, that's wear from the slide passing over it. In my experience, it's more common on stainless steel PP series pistols than those made of carbon steel. On my stainless Ranger PPK, I like a very light coat of grease on parts that slide against each other. Once I've cleaned the pistol, I buff in a tiny amount of grease on the rails, chamber hood and the outside of the barrel.

PS: I've also thought (without any evidence), the lack of this kind of wear on my Ulm and Manurhin pistols could be due to superior fitting.
 

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The attached photo is the wear on my Fort Smith PPKs. This is after more than 2,000 rounds. I am really not sure how many rounds I have fired with this pistol. I usually purchase 500 round boxes, back when they were available, and I know that I have gone through 4 of those. I have also gone through many 50 round boxes that were purchased individually, but I have no idea how many.

The mark below "380" is not nearly as bad as it appears in the photo. A sharp dental pick passed across the mark does not catch on anything, and a 10x magnifier reveals that is only a surface scuff. You can also see some galling on the side of the frame below the barrel. This happened before I started buffing this area with a heavy gun grease. It has not happened since then. None of these marks impacts the pistols function, and none of them has any impact on accuracy. They are just cosmetic blemishes. That's the price you pay for the joy of actually using your pistol.

The real problem is where the slide and the frame contact - the slide rails. As this area wears, it will impact accuracy. You can see in the photo that I use heavy gun grease in this area, and I use a lot of it, and I always have. As a result, there is no visible wear on the slide rails.

I clean my carry pistol at least once a month; however, I also clean it every time its been fired which is usually more than once a month. This frequent cleaning allows me to remove residue before it has time to react with the metal. It also allows me to remove all grease, especially from the slide rails where it was applied liberally, and replace it with a fresh application. It never has time to harden or to accumulate grit.

I clean firearms frequently enough to be concerned with the potentially hazardous solvents. I use Ballistol to clean everything except the bore and chamber. My understanding is that it is mainly an aliphatic hydrocarbon derived from plants. It cleans and lubricate the surfaces, and it works great! I use small drops of a light gun oil on pivot points and areas of light wear. On areas of high wear, I use Brownells Action Lube, but any good gun grease will do. I usually buff it into the metal, but on really high wear areas, like the rails, I apply it liberally. I clean the bore and chamber the same way I clean precision rifles, but that is a whole other discussion.

Hope this helps.

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