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Discussion Starter #1
So... what do you guys use for lube

how much.. where ...
what should I look out for......
Hurry.... I wanna go shooting
 

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I like Milcomm/Kleenbore tw25b grease, but also like Kleenbore Formula 3, which I beleive is what Earl's suggests. Tw25b is a grease only, not a cleaner, tends to stay where you put it and not ooze, drip, etc. Formula 3 is a cleaner/lube combo. I suppose its competitors are Breakfree CLP and maybe FP 10.

I don't care too much what cleaner I use, as my guns don't get too dirty (usually) and I take the time necessary to clean well. Hoppe's 9 works, as do a bunch of others.

Others like Breakfree, Militec, Gun Butter, motor oil, gasoliine, etc. I don't think it really matters too much, except you don't want to use anything that might damage the plastic grips. I have heard stories of militec damaging synthetics, but I don't know this myself.

If you Google or Yahoo terms like gun, lube, cleaner, grease, you will find more opinions and data than you want to read. Do a search here and you will find similar.

Here is text from an old post by "Clayton" on The Firing Line. I thought it was informative.

"There are many different tests used to determine the lubricity and strength of oil and grease, which are conducted by private firms like Falex, in accordince with American Society of Testing Methods standards. The problem with using data like this is many companies refuse to provide
data(RemOil, G96, Mpro7) while others may use the metric measurements vs. standard. They don't want you comparing data.

Here's some data on weld load(ASTM-2596, ASTM-2783). The higher the number, the better the lube:

Break Free CLP--315kg
Tetra Gun Grease--800kg
Militec1--800kg
MilCommTW25B--620kg
Super Lube--250kg
ShootersChoice(MPC) FP-10--720kg

Here's some wear test data(ASTM-4172). The smaller the number, the better the lube:
Break Free CLP .8mm
MilCommTW25B .042mm
CorrosionX .58mm

Here's some corrosion resistance test data(ASTM-1748). The higher the number, the better the protection:
Break Free CLP- 900
CorrosionX- 1160

There are several other tests, but the results are similar. Remember, however, that lab tests do not always predict real world performance. There are trade offs as well. There are no products that are the best at everything, so you must decide what is most important on the weapon being used, as well as the environmental conditions being encountered. Glock's require only moderate corrosion protection, so Tetra Grease would be good, as would TW25B.

Blued firearms like say a Marlin lever action rifle, or parkerized weapons like a Mossberg 590 would benifit most by using Corrosion X.

The best protectant available is Corrosion X. The best lubes available are Tetra Gun Grease, MilComm(Kleenbore) TW25B, and Wilson Combat(Protec) Ultima lube oil and grease.

I use Wilson's Ultima Lube because it protects well, lubes great, stays were you put it, doesn't evaporate or wear off, and it remains visible for easy inspection. Lubes like Tetra and TW25B are all but invisible when applied, which makes it hard to determine the condition of your weapon. I like to be able to see the lubricant on the weapon, or my self esteem tends to suffer."

Be warned, this type of question can generate a lot of debate.

Most important, clean the gun and use some sort of lube.

Have fun.
 

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Most reputable stuff out there isn't bad. I used to use Wilson's but found when left on a firearm for a while, it got kinda goopy looking, almost like it oxidized somewhat, and it seemed pretty stiff at low temperatures.

I've been VERY happy with MilComm. It's what I only use now.

Regardless, grease is always better than oil as long as you can get the grease in the spot requiring lubrication, since it tends to stay put, whereas oil doesn't. The only reason now to use oil is for areas you can't get grease to. It used to be that you would also use oil for low temperatures, but that's no longer true with full synthetic greases such as MilComm.

HTH,
Jeff
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the response
I been using Kleenbore TW25B for my P99's... so I am taken care of in that part
what I was wondering about is how much to apply on the P5 ... and if there is any places you might tend to overlook...
do I lube under the grip pannels anywhere ?
Is there a certain timeframe to clean more than the usual fieldstripping and cleaning the barrel ?
Thanks again for all your help
 

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Lubing is a critical issue for any Walther with plastic components, with the possible exception of the P99 series. Here's the lowdown (founded on my hard discovered experiences with P38s/P1s, P5s and P5Cs, and P88s): For any Walther that has plastic components (primarily grips, but the P5C has a plastic fillet piece between the prip plates-which also houses the mainspring and mainspring strut), the plastic that Walther uses seems to be exceptionally sensitive to a lot of our common solvents, lubes, and cleaning solutions. This results in both marring (where the plastic is softened) and cracking (which seemed to predominately occur around the screw holes-but I also had the P5C's fillet piece crystallize and crack, rendering the weapon unfirable, as the mainspring was unseated and could not provide spring pressure). After discussing this with Earl Sheehan of Earl's Repair, he STRONGLY recommends using Kleenbore Formula Three, as it's less harsh than comparable solutions, and cleans, lubricates and prevents rust without any deleterious effects on plastic or metal. (On my P5, I replaced the plastic grips with the rubber P5 grips that Hogue has)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
thank you again for the Input......
how far do I break it down though on regular bases....
do I remove the grips to clean every time....
where besides the barrel and slide do I put lube on... as some of the spots are hard to reach....
 

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Inside of the P5 barrel lubed?

thank you again for the Input......
how far do I break it down though on regular bases....
do I remove the grips to clean every time....
where besides the barrel and slide do I put lube on... as some of the spots are hard to reach....
I typically clean and lube my P5 either every time I fire it or once every two weeks, whichever happens more often. Every time I clean it, I clean out the barrel with Kleen Bore Formula 3, lube the moving parts with Militec-1 Synthetic Lubricant (both of thee recommedned by Earl), and I give the entire gun a coating of Military Strike Hold to keep it rust-protected. Though I think I'll need to find out if any of these products will cause any wear to the plastic grip plates. Can anyone confirm or deny that?

I just purchased a Sig P229, and the manual recommends keeping the inside of the Sig's barrel lubed when not in use and wiping out the excess oil before firing.

I always figured that such a thing was not practical if the gun was a duty gun that you never knew when you might have to fire it and therefore, never knew when to lube the inside of the barrel and when to wipe out the excess lubricant.

I can never figure out if my not hitting the target dead-center on the firing range is due to a lack of shooting practice (I haven't been able to practice on the range as much as I've wanted too), or due to an inaccurate P5 caused by a corroded barrel, or a combination of the two.

Do I need to keep the P5's barrel lubed inside to keep the inside of the barrel from corroding? Will simply cleaning out the barrel after firing be sufficient to stop corrosion?
 

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I typically clean and lube my P5 either every time I fire it or once every two weeks, whichever happens more often. Every time I clean it, I clean out the barrel with Kleen Bore Formula 3, lube the moving parts with Militec-1 Synthetic Lubricant (both of thee recommedned by Earl), and I give the entire gun a coating of Military Strike Hold to keep it rust-protected. Though I think I'll need to find out if any of these products will cause any wear to the plastic grip plates. Can anyone confirm or deny that?

I just purchased a Sig P229, and the manual recommends keeping the inside of the Sig's barrel lubed when not in use and wiping out the excess oil before firing.

I always figured that such a thing was not practical if the gun was a duty gun that you never knew when you might have to fire it and therefore, never knew when to lube the inside of the barrel and when to wipe out the excess lubricant.

I can never figure out if my not hitting the target dead-center on the firing range is due to a lack of shooting practice (I haven't been able to practice on the range as much as I've wanted too), or due to an inaccurate P5 caused by a corroded barrel, or a combination of the two.

Do I need to keep the P5's barrel lubed inside to keep the inside of the barrel from corroding? Will simply cleaning out the barrel after firing be sufficient to stop corrosion?

I did some double-checking, and I think I found an answer to one of my questions. It seems I've been cleaning out my P5 barrel the wrong way for a while, and I need to clean out the barrel in a different way. :rolleyes:

But there's one thing I still am unsure of despite checking, can the cleaning products I use (Militec-1 lubricant and Strike Hold Military) damage or discolor the plastic grip plates? :confused:

It seems JonInWAP1P5 may be on to something.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Since I have originally posted this question....

I have yet always cleaned the bore and then put some Clean Bore "greased lightning" on a mob and pulled it through a few times.....
Just make sure there isn't a thick film of it in the barrel and you will be fine without having to whipe out the barrel after doing this...
 

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You can't beat Militec-1. No question IMHO
 

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I use Breakfree Bore Cleaner and CLP. I clean my pistols after each range session, or oil and wipe down once every three months when not in use. Last time I talked to Earl I mentioned CLP and Remoil. He approves of both for use on Walther weapons although he touts Kleenbore. Lube points of frame and barrel contact as well as lightly lubricating moving bits and pieces. I run a wet patch down the tube and then a dry patch to clear out the excess.
 

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An update on this thread:
I had a couple of cans of Strike Hold in my cleaning box for a year or so. I'm headed to the range today so I sprayed down the slide rails on my SIGs with them and then gave them a wipe. They dired almost instantly. SIGs are like Glocks in my experience...they don't need a gallon of lube to function well. Strike Hold REALLY evaporates FAST. I will see how well it lubes. It gets rave reviews online. As to the quewstion one person asked about dange to plastics....from their website:

ELECTRICAL / COMMUNICATIONS
Strike-Hold® has an extremely high dielectric strength and will actually improve electrical performance by cleaning and protecting contacts and internal parts, including circuitry and connections. This product will not harm commonly associated materials, such as rubber, most plastics, and wood finishes.

I doubt Strike Hold will have a negative effect on plastic in guns. I am gonna e-mail them to verify that.



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