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Most center-fires can be safely dry fired, although there are exceptions such as the Beretta Tomcat.

Most rim-fires cannot be safely dry fired because doing so will cause the firing pin to strike directly against the chamber face where the ammo's rim would normally be. Exceptions to this rule include most Ruger semiautomatic rim-fires, and even the Ruger rim-fire revolvers equipped with a transfer bar between the hammer and the firing pin.
 

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I dry fired one at the guns store today...no issue and the salesperson didn't freak out:eek:. It has a nice trigger and looks like a great value.
 

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...
... Exceptions to this rule include most Ruger semiautomatic rim-fires, and even the Ruger rim-fire revolvers equipped with a transfer bar between the hammer and the firing pin.
Without further investigation, I won't dispute your conclusion but why would a transfer bar make any difference?

M
 

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Without further investigation, I won't dispute your conclusion but why would a transfer bar make any difference?

M
Don't know why that is, Mike, but directly from Ruger's "New Model" Convertible Six manual:

DRY-FIRING: Going through the actions of cocking, aiming, and pulling the trigger of an unloaded gun is known as “Dry Firing.” It can be useful to learn the “feel” of your revolver. Be certain the revolver is unloaded and that the gun is pointing in a safe direction even when practicing by dry-firing. The Ruger®new model single-action revolvers can be dry-fired without damage to the firing pin or other components.
 

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I think you're reading something into it that's not there. Where does it say that it's the transfer bar that allows it?

M
It doesn't. You may be correct. However the previous "Old Model" manual does not address dry fire, and there are numerous reports of dry fire cylinder damage on those that have not had the conversion to the transfer bar. As such, I thought I was making a pretty valid assumption.

Was I wrong to do so?
 

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I... As such, I thought I was making a pretty valid assumption.

Was I wrong to do so?
U.E. : I don't know, I don't have either of those Rugers to look at. But I suspect that if there is any difference between them regarding susceptibility to damage from dry-firing, it's probably found in the design of the firing pin or in the rim counterbores of the cylinder.

The transfer bar will "transfer" the impact of the hammer to the firing pin whenever the hammer is cocked and the trigger is pulled. The gun can't tell whether the chambers are loaded or not; the impact on the back of the firing pin will be exactly the same.

M
 

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Oh, I understand that, Mike. The cylinders of the "Old Model" three-screw Single Sixes that had the transfer bar safety modifications initiated in the "New Model" two-screw Single Sixes were unchanged. Indeed, the weapons were returned to the owners after modification with the original cylinders. That led me to believe that the firing pins were modified during conversion, probably (to my assumption) to limit travel.

But, then again, I could be wrong on that. It's been known to happen.
 

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U.E. Have you determined from observation what halts the forward motion of the firing pin if one dry-fires an old-style Single-Six? Will it be halted by the firing pin tip striking the cylinder either at the edge of the chamber or on the circumference of its counterbore?

I don't know with respect to any Ruger revolver, new or old.

I do know from experience that it will not strike the cylinder in an S&W K-22 because the hammer stops against the frame and the firing pin (which is mounted on the frame, not on the hammer) is closely fitted to leave a smidgeon of clearance with the cylinder counterbore, while still providing enough protrusion to stab a .22 cartridge rim if one is present in that space.

The presence of a transfer bar in a Ruger or a hammer block in an S&W has nothing to do with it.

M
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I asked because my son in law dry fired his sr40 without the magazine in it and damaged the striker. He had to send it to ruger to be fixed. The manual does say not to dry fire it with the mag. removed. After that if it doesn't say in the manual I try to find out.
 

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Think of it this way: when there's a cartridge in the chamber, the fall of the firing pin is cushioned somewhat by denting the relatively soft primer. But if you dry fire, the firing pin is stopped when steel strikes steel. Does it hurt? I don't know. I guess it depends on how small an area is struck*, and how well the steel resists deformation and breakage. It might not do any harm, but it can't be good for it.

*Ever see a hardwood floor subjected to spike heels?

M
 
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