Walther Forums banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,141 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
No new guns in more than a year now. 2014 was the year of the blade for my collection. Here is what I got myself involved in.:eek:



It started a couple years ago with the 8" Alamo Memorial Bowie which I recently dressed up with this specially-made leather sheath.

Then a year and a half ago I found the 9" Bowie from Taiwan.

Next came the 10" S&W-marked Bowie from China.

An 11" toothpick also from China.

The Pakistani Khyber Bowie with a nearly 14" blade needed considerable work with steel wool to clean up the brass.

The Chinese saber is 22" along the top of the blade point to hilt. The sheath was made by the same tack and holster maker as the Alamo Bowie sheath.

This home-made double-edged sword in my pride of the group. What is now a 28" blade is made of titanium from a blank piece I got some 40 years ago when I was heavily into martial arts.

Along the way I ordered the M7 bayonet to fix to my Mossberg 590 12ga.

An inexpensive set of throwing knives seemed appropriate.

I do train with many of these as I used to train with wooden swords in the past. Good to have a first aid kit handy but so far haven't cut myself.:eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,069 Posts
Nice cutlery! I'm more for the function and utility of a knife, and in what I do, a razor blade is probably used more. No, I'm not a barber...

Razor blades mostly being used for scraping gasket material off of engines parts, etc. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,141 Posts
Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Maybe we should make this thread ...

... wait for it ...

... a Sticky? :)
No! Not a Sticky!

Not until I show one more pair of items I picked up and mounted in the past weeks.
These are supposedly 16th and 17th century blades in 20th century furniture that used to contain a replica dai-sho from 40 years ago.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
These new Steel Will knives are just beautiful.
They do have some nice blades there, however more than half their models were out of stock last time I visited. Some models are a little expensive IMO, but haven't handled one so maybe there is an element of quality I am missing.
As far as quality knives at reasonable prices, Ontario and ESEE are 2 brands I would highly recommend. Both make real utilitarian tools, not just fancy looking blades.
It always brings a slight smile to my face when I see a "blade expert" with a collection of fancy/ornate knives, made from metals horrible for actual use, with all sorts of machining to make them look "tactical", "cool", or "deadly" (all of which I have heard people use to describe their collections).
There is nothing wrong with owning them as art pieces, if that is your intention and understanding, but it always amuses me when people mistake them for legitimate tools/weapons. Buy as many cool flashy knives from China/Taiwan as you want, but it does not make you any sort of authority or expert on blades.

FYI: My rant has nothing to do with the OP or any other posts in this thread, the topic just reminded me of certain types of "knife collectors" whom I do not have great amounts of respect for. I'm off my soap box now...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,141 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Collecting is of course a very personal hobby. The sorts of things a collector is apt to find attractive depends on that person's interests and activities. As one pursues an interest such as martial arts for example and his/her knowledge and expertise develops and matures the focus of collecting is likely to shift from one area to another. Surly not every enthusiast will become a collector nor every collector an expert. The joy of an activity such as shooting/hunting/tactical training naturally brings some level of expertise in learning all one can about the techniques and tools used. The natural born collector will likely collect the tools and hopefully correct and useful techniques will be learned for various items in a collection. One generally does not collect Lugers for tactical training but if one is spending thousands of dollars for century-old relics then it makes sense to learn about the history. By extension one might become enthralled with the history of warfare and eventually with the history of those combatants and the socio-political conditions that led to those wars. Pretty soon the focus becomes history itself. Because written history is largely made up of the histories of wars between and within nations and empires that were fought mostly with swords and other sharp pointed objects it follows that the collector part of the personality might redirect toward such weapons. On that note...

...I'm going to check on the progress of New Horizons as it approaches Pluto.:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
First Para, I was not referring to you or your collection when I made my comments. Just want to make sure u know that.
Second, I agree that collections can be very subjective, and personal taste & interests can cause collections to manifest into extensions of the owner. I greatly enjoy the history, both sociological and technologically, of edged weapons (and defense technology in general). Neither of those points relate to what I was discussing in my last post however.
There is a huge difference between "old" styles of blades, actually old blades, and gaudy showpieces. The collections I was referring to were those containing knives of this sort https://www.pinterest.com/pin/352054895842738754/

It is flashy blades like this I was referring to in my previous post. Knives that have no functional value due to "cool" design features that only weaken the blade. I have met quite a few "blade experts" who's collections contain nothing but blades of this sort, cheap katana knockoffs, and a few medieval style blades. Then they go swing them around in a manner learned from movies, call it practice, and then believe they have some sort of actual combat skill when it comes to edged weapons. Those who fit in that category are the ones I am amused by and give me a laugh.
Those who genuinely study and have interest in the history and technology of blades as well as understand the difference between a prop, replica, antique, and functional knife; I have absolutely no problem with. A majority of young "blade experts" unfortunately, do not fit into this category. If anyone is reading this and wondering where you land, if you are famiar with terms like Masamune, Randall, Hamaguri-ba,and ulfbert; you are more than likely in the first group.
If you dont know any of them and are a knife "collector"... Learn about them. Learn about the history and technology of blades, so if you ever are in a situation where you need to defend yourself with one, you don't grab a useless showpiece. If you are interested in learning to defend yourself with a blade, do not learn from movies... You will die in a fight... Quickly. Learn an established discipline that has techniques you feel suit your personal frame, strength, and emotional fortitude.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
Wow those are some nice blades. The only thing I have is my EDC blade which is a Kershaw Blur. One thing I like about it is that it gets used every day for misc stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,141 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Wow those are some nice blades. The only thing I have is my EDC blade which is a Kershaw Blur. One thing I like about it is that it gets used every day for misc stuff.
My Buck 110V fills that bill.
Just picked up two more including this 13" field knife, origin unknown

and this 20" kris probably from the Philippines.

they were cheap in a package deal. Both were rusted and crusted so I shamelessly went after them with 220 grit sandpaper. I'll see about finishing them with 1500 grit. Work in progress.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
579 Posts
Well, I can jump on this one...

Fixed blades:
http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l134/crimsonfalcon07/Fixed Blade Knives/20140808_093306_zpstvtlz4cc.jpg
http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l134/crimsonfalcon07/Fixed Blade Knives/20140510_003832_zpsx9wcs3n6.jpg
http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l134/crimsonfalcon07/Fixed Blade Knives/20140314_213239_zpstxrnikgy.jpg
http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l134/crimsonfalcon07/Fixed Blade Knives/20131109_215418_zps6ee863f3.jpg
http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l134/crimsonfalcon07/Fixed Blade Knives/20131004_1519061_zps8d91e767.jpg
http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l134/crimsonfalcon07/Fixed Blade Knives/20130821_174312_zpse3274247.jpg
http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l134/crimsonfalcon07/Fixed Blade Knives/20130716_233812_zpsd6f77235.jpg
http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l134/crimsonfalcon07/Fixed Blade Knives/20130320_1545471_zps85d565df.jpg
http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l134/crimsonfalcon07/Fixed Blade Knives/20121227_210400.jpg
http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l134/crimsonfalcon07/Fixed Blade Knives/Small EDC Fixed Blades/20120506_114020.jpg
http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l134/crimsonfalcon07/Swords/20150401_234255_zpsyi2ow6sb.jpg
http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l134/crimsonfalcon07/Swords/20140313_113958_zpsdmayhwgx.jpg
http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l134/crimsonfalcon07/Swords/20131004_163414_zps02d88e26.jpg
http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l134/crimsonfalcon07/Swords/20130904_161750_zpsff2f7a33.jpg
http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l134/crimsonfalcon07/Swords/20120731_230749.jpg

And here's a few I didn't make:
Himalayan Imports:
http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l134/crimsonfalcon07/Fixed Blade Knives/2011-11-29105835.jpg

Barry Dawson:
http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l134/crimsonfalcon07/Fixed Blade Knives/2011-10-11161955.jpg

Cold Steel:
http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l134/crimsonfalcon07/Fixed Blade Knives/2011-05-26185231.jpg

HI and Kabar:
http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l134/crimsonfalcon07/Khukuri pictures/2010-12-23170800.jpg

Folders:
HK14650:
http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l134/crimsonfalcon07/Folding Knives/2011-01-28211114.jpg

BM Monochrome:
http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l134/crimsonfalcon07/Folding Knives/2011-01-28211433.jpg

BM Pardue:
http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l134/crimsonfalcon07/Folding Knives/2011-01-28211757.jpg

BM Ritter Griptilian, Spyderco Manix 2, ZT 350, DDR HTM Gunhammer Radian:
http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l134/crimsonfalcon07/Folding Knives/2011-09-08215725.jpg

HTM Gunhammer copper:
http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l134/crimsonfalcon07/Folding Knives/100_3469.jpg

A few more:
http://i95.photobucket.com/albums/l134/crimsonfalcon07/Folding Knives/20121020_2235531.jpg

Yeah. That's a small sample of the collection. There are a lot more, and more designs in my head that I have yet to make.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Nice blades crimson. Theres alot of work in some of those pieces. Am I to infer from your statement that all the blades in the first group of pictures were made by you? I can definetly tell some of the blades are hand crafted, and some very nicely. How much of the work do you do yourself? And by that I mean do you just do the blades or do you craft the handles/sheaths as well? It definetly appears that the leather sheath for the long handmade blade is handmade as well, but do you make the kydex sheaths pictured too?
I saw a few blades where you started from full stock, however there were also pictures of multiple blanks. Do you create blanks, then select from those when making a blade, or do you buy blanks to begin you knives?
I am just beginning to really get into creating my own knives from the ground up and am very interested in your process and knowledge. What type of furnace do you use? What process do you use for forming composite handles? Also do you do any forging or just work from stock? I've got tons of questions if you would allow me to pick your brain.
I'm sure the others reading this thread would be interested as well, but feel free to PM me if you would like to discuss your methods less publicly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
579 Posts
Yup, all the blades in the first batch are mine. I do blades, handles, and sheaths. I have a kydex press, but I'm not terrifically good with kydex, and so have transitioned primarily to leather. I tend to courbouille it though, so my leather tends to be pretty stiff and behave very much like kydex. It's just a lot easier to work, and I think better accents the wood handles.

I'm a stock removal guy. I start from flat bar stock, cut out the blade shape, grind bevels, and do some finish work, then I send out to a professional company for heat treat. I use primarily high-end steels like CPM 3V, which requires cryo-plates as part of the heat treat process, so it's not really something to do at home, like you could with a simple carbon steel. Then I clean the blade up, make handle scales, do final polishing and cleaning, and make a sheath or scabbard. The last thing I do is sharpen the final edge. You don't want to forge a steel like 3V. Forging is fun, and it's good for minimizing waste, but it's not really a good idea with a complicated modern steel, because the name of the game is consistency in grain structure, and forging means you have different parts of the metal getting heated and cooled with different timing and temps, which means it's not going to have consistent grain structure. You'd have to run at least one normalizing cycle before final heat treat to get optimal results.

But wait, you say. Isn't it a good thing in, say, a katana, to get a folded steel blade? Yes and no. Medieval steels were very inconsistent, and had a lot of impurities. That's part of why the crucible steel that the Ulfberht swords were made from were so much better than the average; the production process yielded a much more consistently pure steel. Similarly, the tamahagane used to make the best katana (an iron sand with a pretty consistent and fine grain structure) was a more pure and consistent material. Folding the steel would help remove impurities and would refine the grain structure to be smaller. If you break a nice knife blade, you'll see a pretty fine grain structure within the blade, whereas if you break pot metal, it will look very much like coarse grey sand.

Modern metallurgy, on the other hand, doesn't require any of that, because you're starting with something like a powdered steel with carefully engineered grain structure), and the carbide formation is controlled very precisely with digital temperature control, etc, rather than merely by color, sound, etc. So, forging a modern steel is neither necessary nor advantageous. If someone were to go back in time with a CPM 3V sword to medieval times, it would doubtless be renowned as a magical sword, as it would literally be able to cut through the other swords of the era, and would comparatively never need sharpening. 3V is great stuff because it can be tempered much harder (HRC 60), but still be as strong as a spring steel at a much lower toughness.

I don't know how much of that is interesting to you and others, and as far as the rest of it goes, we'll want to talk privately, I'm sure. I love metallurgy, and have given a lot of thought to it relative to firearms also. There are MUCH better steels out there that could produce incredibly better barrels, I'd bet. Materials science will yield the next frontier for accuracy and durability. I'd bet on it being possible to use a crucible powder steel to yield a barrel that would at least triple the life span of your average gun barrel and, because the grain structure is so much more consistent, it would also be much more accurate as well, than the basic carbon steels used in ordnance. It would be very pricey, but I'm sure there are shooters out there who would spend the dough for the pinnacle of accuracy and durability.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,141 Posts
Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Blade update

Two years now I have been at this. This has been a year to concentrate on much older blades: the katana, wakizashi, and naginata blades as well as the yari are hunderds of years old.

Naginata (top) I remade from the old blade. Yari (second from top) is all original but the leather wrap I use to cover severe damage to the tooled wood below the hilt. Nunti and chiang were homemade from retail components years ago.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,141 Posts
Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Some recent additions

Shoto of unknown origin


Short double-edged 'tanto' point

Inexpensive Karambit

Current set of folders

and one nasty little item I can shoot in my back yard.

A new letter opener

 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top