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I will be receiving a Zastava M70 (32 ACP) soon from RGuns. It's going to come with a liberal batch of cosmoline because it is "new old stock" having been unissued and stored for several years. I figured for $225 it could be a good deal. Viewing some reviews on YouTube one of the first things that had to be done was to deal with the cosmoline issue. Has anyone dealt with this? Suggestions?
Thanks, Mark.
 

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I will be receiving a Zastava M70 (32 ACP) soon from RGuns. It's going to come with a liberal batch of cosmoline because it is "new old stock" having been unissued and stored for several years. I figured for $225 it could be a good deal. Viewing some reviews on YouTube one of the first things that had to be done was to deal with the cosmoline issue. Has anyone dealt with this? Suggestions?
Thanks, Mark.
 

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It is essentially thick grease. Get a bottle of Simple Green concentrate. Don’t dilute it. I have used it to clean off the Cosmoline from an old British Lee Enfield parts rifle. Caked in the stuff. Blue shop/garage paper towels and some of that Simple Green did the job for me. Only thing is, it dries out whatever it is on. So make sure you lube up and oil the surfaces you use it on. Isn’t too bad on smell, either.
 

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+1 for Simple Green. The stuff's awesome.
 
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surrealone, you ever use the purple stuff they have?? Whatever standard simple green misses, this stuff wipes off the planet. We use it for the parts cleaner next to the Waterjet cutter at work. Gunky stuff goes down to bare metal PDQ.

Seriously though, get a jar of that 3-in-1 oil from your local hardware store or get whatever gun oil you prefer. I have never seen a degreaser dry out a surface like this stuff. Really works. Friend of mine picked up a Mosin 91/30 at a gun show one time, and after looking it over for him, I handed it back to the dealer for him to get serial number and start the paperwork. Didn't realize the cosmoline was gooping out of the stock at the seam. Thankfully we had a spray bottle of the green and some rags. Bout needed half a gallon of moisturizer afterwards, though. To quote Crazy Uncle Si... Hey, GoodNESS, Jack!!!
 

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A stiff paint brush, some dental picks, and compressed air are useful as well. If your willing to get your hands dirty cosmoline isn't that bad.

I would make a point of removing the firing pin from the slide and scrubbing out the firing pin channel.
 

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Redcat hit a good point. That stuff gets EVERYWHERE and if it is left in the firing pin channel and hardens up, you could be fighting the invisible enemy of light primer strikes or complete failure to hit primer at all.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I ended up using mineral spirits--removed the grips, field stripped it and let everything soak in a tray filled with the mineral spirits. Then I went over it with some brushes and cleaned what ever residue remained and used a lot of patches. Took it to the range and got nothing but light strikes--not a round would go off. Took it back home and worked on the firing pin and spring and got out the remaining cosmoline. Back to the range and voila everything was fine. It shoots well but the trigger sucks--must be about a 10# pull and it stages very poorly. Oh well I guess it was worth $225...
 

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You know what else I have had great luck with? WD-40 and compressed air of some sort. If you don't have access to shop air, those cans of compressed air for cleaning out keyboards is just the cats pajamas. Get your tray back out, field strip it again. Get yourself one of those WD-40 cans with the smart spray nozzle and long red tube. Cannot begin to tell you how much easier it is to use with that attachment. Get that tube in there as best you can, close to the offending gunky area. Pour it on, just soak it. Let it sit maybe 5 minutes to penetrate, and then in a safe manner blow that stuff out. WD not only breaks that crap up, but lubes the surfaces. Two stones, one bird in my eyes.
 
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