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That's right. But whether they were in a functional condition or not....they were history....the real McCoy. It's a shame they didn't at least get passed on to a museum.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I'm guessing the box was a re-purposed lead lined box for rifle ammo. Until the sand dune collapsed and broke off the end of the box, some of those pistols might have been in fairly good shape. Some might still have been cleaned up rather nicely. From its muzzle, the pistol on the top between the two mags (left of it) and P-38 grips (right of it) looks to be a Walther PP with some bluing still visible on the frame forward of the trigger guard.
 

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DEPistole, lead-lined box? What purpose might that have served originally?


Yeah, shame they were destroyed, tho' museums are surely stocked with similar examples.
We fret about wiping and preserving guns, and these have been in/near the Baltic for 80 years; pretty amazing.
Moon
 
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What a find! (My Dad and his comrades threw their weapons into the Baltic. Best to be unarmed when captured.)


https://www.guns.com/news/2019/02/2...nds-box-of-30-wwii-pistols-after-storm-photos
Thanks for sharing the article. For sure there is plenty of this stuff still to be discovered.

Put yourself in the shoes of a guy in Central/Eastern Europe who lived through the war and the chaos that followed. Despite the official governmental policies, you might very well think it prudent to hide and hang on to that bit of kit from the war.


I hope your Dad shared stories with you of his WW2 experiences.

My Father was always pretty quiet about it. He only opened up in his very last years.

The things some of those guys saw and experienced was unbelievable. It's amazing most of them were able to function "normally" in polite society after the experience.
 

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.....I hope your Dad shared stories with you of his WW2 experiences.

My Father was always pretty quiet about it. He only opened up in his very last years.

The things some of those guys saw and experienced was unbelievable. It's amazing most of them were able to function "normally" in polite society after the experience.

The CEOs dad served in Korea, he's in his 80s and has JUST started to talk about it.


Unreal stuff, survived the winter at Chosin Reservoir with only "cool weather" gear (almost NO winter supplies were provided to the troops before winter hit), watched most of his friends die of exposure, had to literally "kick start" their guns to use them (point barrel over the shoulder and "stomp" the charging handle to break the ice free).
 

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The CEOs dad served in Korea, he's in his 80s and has JUST started to talk about it.


Unreal stuff, survived the winter at Chosin Reservoir with only "cool weather" gear (almost NO winter supplies were provided to the troops before winter hit), watched most of his friends die of exposure, had to literally "kick start" their guns to use them (point barrel over the shoulder and "stomp" the charging handle to break the ice free).
I've seen some documentaries about Chosin. Horrific what those guys went through. Casualty rate through the roof. I have enormous respect for those guys.
 

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I've seen some documentaries about Chosin. Horrific what those guys went through. Casualty rate through the roof. I have enormous respect for those guys.

Really, Earl is a damn "Rockstar" in my eyes, I'm proud just to know a man like him.


Was a "walk on" at Alabama (Roll Tide) football tryouts, got a full ride offer for his kicking abilities, went to war with his buddies instead. That's sacrifice.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
His memories often left him agitated and unable to sleep. Refugee columns, people and horses, cut to bits by strafing planes. Children lost and wondering. Deep snow. Lice. Hunger. Hopelessness. Comrades dying in agony. Then, after survival, knowing it was all for nothing but a criminal and evil regime / idealogy.
 

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Knowing a man of his character makes me wonder if our country can amass ANOTHER group of men to fight a war of significant magnitude, with unimaginable sacrifice and hardship.
 

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These days, kids are horrified at finding a boxful of guns, or terrified by the authorities. In my youth, I and 20 of my friends would have had new toys.

Incidentally, the box was likely NOT lead-lined. The inner box would have been tinned steel, with its cover soldered on to be airtight. (I have some similar boxes from WWII of real cabinet quality, with dovetail joints and flush latches.) The one shown in the link is postwar Yugoslav.

Prewar, DWM sometimes used sheet zinc in place of tinned steel; eventually these disintegrated to powder, and may (either intentionally or not) have acted like a sacrificial metal; the ammo inside being perfectly preserved. I had two such cases of 9mm Steyr dated 1938; what I have left is, to this day, still sure-fire. That's quality.

M
 

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These days, kids are horrified at finding a boxful of guns, or terrified by the authorities. In my youth, I and 20 of my friends would have had new toys.

Incidentally, the box was likely NOT lead-lined. The inner box would have been tinned steel, with its cover soldered on to be airtight. (I have some similar boxes from WWII of real cabinet quality, with dovetail joints and flush latches.) The one shown in the link is postwar Yugoslav.

Prewar, DWM sometimes used sheet zinc in place of tinned steel; eventually these disintegrated to powder, and may (either intentionally or not) have acted like a sacrificial metal; the ammo inside being perfectly preserved. I had two such cases of 9mm Steyr dated 1938; what I have left is, to this day, still sure-fire. That's quality.

M
These days, teachers, the local police and probably the ATF would get involved. The kids would need counseling. Lawmakers would call for more legislation.

Despite the heavy handed approach of current times, we are no safer. You just can't replace common sense.
 

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These days, teachers,... The kids would need counseling.
I rather doubt it. Kids here in Florida seem to find weapons all the time. If they turn them in it makes the news in a good way. If they bring them to school in their backpack to show their friends they get arrested and make the news in a bad way.

Counseling only happens if threats are made or shots are fired.

In September here in Florida a Santaluces High School Principal found a semi-automatic 380 pistol in a back pack while searching for unauthorized food. He noticed a student left school grounds and bought food from a food truck. When the student returned to campus the principal found the weapon. The student said he found it on the way to school that day...no counseling, just arrest.
 

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I rather doubt it. Kids here in Florida seem to find weapons all the time. If they turn them in it makes the news in a good way. If they bring them to school in their backpack to show their friends they get arrested and make the news in a bad way.

Counseling only happens if threats are made or shots are fired.

In September here in Florida a Santaluces High School Principal found a semi-automatic 380 pistol in a back pack while searching for unauthorized food. He noticed a student left school grounds and bought food from a food truck. When the student returned to campus the principal found the weapon. The student said he found it on the way to school that day...no counseling, just arrest.
Its call hyperbolizing olsoul. A literary technique using exaggeration to make a point.

Though I suspect, in some parts of the country it might be of less exaggeration than others.
 
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