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Some things stand out for me in this story ...


The PPK is "iconic and sleek" ... certainly this does not describe the current iteration pictured.


"Currently most of the pistol's parts are supplied by third-party vendors." That speaks to the new pistols quality.


"...a single worker can build, test fire, clean, and prep 35 pistols for shipping in a day's time." Hot damn! with 20 workers on line they can shuck out 700 pistols a day! That should be enough to satisfy anyone who wants one in two or three weeks... How many can they repair in a day?
 

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10', you posted while I was typing.
The gun looks better in your shots, and the extended, but not threaded, barrel is a puzzlement. Am I getting numb to it, or is the beavertail now a little less obnoxious?
Moon
 

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...


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"...a single worker can build, test fire, clean, and prep 35 pistols for shipping in a day's time." ...
Of course they can. Assuming these Stakhanovites work a full 8-hour day, and don't stop to pee, they can horseshoe-toss one onto the loading dock every 13 minutes and 45 seconds.

They (and the guns) must be marvels to behold.

M
 

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10', you posted while I was typing.
The gun looks better in your shots, and the extended, but not threaded, barrel is a puzzlement. Am I getting numb to it, or is the beavertail now a little less obnoxious?
Moon
I've been studying that picture a little more thoroughly and it looks like the slide is not fully seated forward, thus making the barrel look longer and the beavertail look a little less obnoxious. :)
 

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Currently most of the pistol's parts are supplied by third-party vendors....

Hmmmm
Which is common practice today. Maybe not 70 or 80 years ago, but today....yeppers.

As an example:

Around 80% of Airbus’ activity is sourced. The company works with more than 12,000 suppliers worldwide that provide products and services for flying and non-flying parts.
 

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Which is common practice today. Maybe not 70 or 80 years ago, but today....yeppers.

As an example:

Around 80% of Airbus’ activity is sourced. The company works with more than 12,000 suppliers worldwide that provide products and services for flying and non-flying parts.
I agree. This is much more common and widespread than generally known, including in the firearms industry.

Manufacturing tolerances can be kept tighter nowadays to the point where many if not most guns today's are simply assembled. How much in the way of hand fitting goes into a Glock, VP9, M&P Shield, .....???

I wonder about that paradigm though when applied to old school firearms like the PPK or Smith Revolvers.

We will see with the PPK. With the Smith's, the new guns often feel "rough and clunky" as their is nobody ensuring every last detail is just right. That would take skills and time and in the modern world, those two things are expensive.

Just my 2 cents from the cheap seats.
 

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I've acquired some of the MIM S&Ws, and can't say I'm unhappy with them. The single action is quite good, and the double action tolerable. They still respond to spring changes and a little internal tweaking.
That said, the older, forged parts could be a little bumpy out of the box, but were much nicer to work with, and the resulting (double action) feels better.
But we are where we are...but three days to train a worker? Ouch.
Moon
 

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Outsourcing is primarily an economic decision: is it cheaper to buy or to make? Only secondarily, in most cases, is it a matter of obtaining a better part. One exception is the magazine, which can make or break a gun's success. It has to be made right. As it happens, Mec-Gar has the talent and equipment to make a better magazine than Walther ever could, and less expensive besides. The same is true of small investment-cast or MIM parts.

The Ranger-made Interarms guns all used triggers, hammers, safeties, trigger guards, hammer blocks, ejectors, extractors and rear sights from Hitchener. These required no machining,* only cosmetic polishing. Pins, springs and grips are always outsourced. That leaves basically just the barrel, slide and frame to be made or machined in-house.

This means that the finished product relies heavily on scrupulous, in-depth quality control and final inspection, as well as extensive testing after any change in design, materials or processes. In this regard some companies do much better than others; it depends a lot on managerial philosophy.

M
 

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HERE IS AN EDITED SUBSTITUTE FOR #15.

Outsourcing is primarily an economic decision: is it cheaper to buy or to make? Only secondarily, in most cases, is it a matter of obtaining a better part. One exception is the magazine, which can make or break a gun's success. It has to be made right. As it happens, Mec-Gar has the talent and equipment to make a better magazine than Walther ever could, and less expensive besides. The same is true of small investment-cast or MIM parts.

The Ranger-made Interarms guns all used triggers, hammers, safeties, trigger guards, hammer blocks, ejectors, extractors and rear sights from Hitchener. These required only final machining, and cosmetic polishing. Pins, springs and grips are always outsourced. That leaves basically just the barrel, slide and frame to be made or machined in-house.

This means that whether the finished product is excellent, mediocre or execrable is determined by the level of scrupulous quality control and final inspection, as well as extensive testing after any change in design, materials or processes. In this regard some companies do much better than others; it depends a lot on managerial philosophy.

M

P.S. I have NO interest is going through some square dance with the Admin to change it.
 

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I've acquired some of the MIM S&Ws, and can't say I'm unhappy with them. The single action is quite good, and the double action tolerable. They still respond to spring changes and a little internal tweaking.
That said, the older, forged parts could be a little bumpy out of the box, but were much nicer to work with, and the resulting (double action) feels better.
But we are where we are...but three days to train a worker? Ouch.
Moon
Yep. That three days thing stuck out. No matter how well the parts are made, I'd like to think the person assembling them has more skills and experience than the average Akea employee.

I think this is especially true when something is not quite right.

This is what I believe we see with the new Smith revolvers. Sometimes it works out, but when something is off, does the former Akea guy have the "feel", skills, talent and time to spot it and make it right?? Doubtful.
 
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