Walther Forums banner

1 - 20 of 40 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I read where the Fort Smith, Arkansas Walther production for the PPK or PPK/S is limited to 380 ACP. I'm interested in acquiring a 32 ACP version but don't want to take a chance on a pistol that is 30-50 years old. Are they still being made in Ulm in 32 ACP and if so can they be shipped to the USA?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,553 Posts
Because of the Gun Control Act of 1968 even if Walther still made a PPK of any caliber they would not be able to import it into the USA. That was why they created the PPK/S, a hybrid of the PPK's short slide with the longer frame of the PP which gave the weapon enough "points" to allow it to be imported to the USA. However Ulm is not presently making the PPK.

Gene is right about older PPK models out there. Don't let their age bother you. I have a 33 year old Ranger PPK that I don't hesitate to carry either as a primary or BUG. It has never misfired. I carried a Manurhin PPK/S for years (and still do every so often).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Got a .32 PPK that's 50 YOA and don't see a problem with it. Got a FN 1910 that's 100 years old, likewise no problem. Don't quite understand concerns over the age on a quality steel pistol...they age well.
It's not the age so much as it's the price they are going for. I figured if the Fort Smith unit would offer that caliber it wouldn't be so costly. A lot of the used 32s out there are wartime production and the last thing I'll ever own is a pistol with Nazi provenance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
Guess I was lucky on the price of my W Germany pistol, likewise on the 1910, nothing like a Ft Smith pistol price. Fact is, as I saw on Lucky Gunner's website where he tested the .32, VERY few people buy .32s today compared to .380s...some pretty informative statistics, which I can't remember. I doubt Ft. Smith will ever make a .32 for sale; demand for all steel .32s in PPK size just isn't there. Since they import the slides from Germany, I guess Walther USA could get .32 slides/barrels, but why bother?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Guess I was lucky on the price of my W Germany pistol...
Well you are right about 32 ACP not being a popular caliber. I used to own a Beretta Tomcat (32 ACP) but sold it. Problem was that because of the design it could not handle any round that produced more than 130 FP and a lot of the ammo out there was rated higher, like Hornady 60 gr XTP which was rated at 133. Anyway I got on Armslist.com and am thinking about an Interarms HSC Mauser copy or even a CZ 50 or 70 provided they are in good shape. I'll let this forum know how it works out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,412 Posts
If you are looking for a .32 in a PP pistol you are in luck. The old police pistols in this caliber seem to be pretty plentiful. German police moved up to larger calibers and a lot of these hit the market. I bought one a few years ago for $318 but with only one mag. New mags are available from MecGar for about $30. There isn't anything wrong with the quality of them and the .32 (which is the caliber the PP pistols were designed for) is soft recoiling. A pleasure to shoot...I shot two or three boxes of various ammo through the one above this weekend. No stoppages ever...uh, until you run out of ammo. A PPK will be a bit more difficult to find.. I can't remember if Interarms/Ranger manufactured any .32 cal pistols or not. Gettin' old. 1917
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,412 Posts
WTS: PP from 73 Here is a nice .32 from Ulm. I would not hesitate to purchase any firearm Pilkguns might put up for sale. He is a straight shooter. Might be sold by now...seems he had several...but I might be wrong there. 1917
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
I can't remember if Interarms/Ranger manufactured any .32 cal pistols or not. Gettin' old. 1917
They did. I lucked into a couple of them. Later a friend liked mine and I told him it might take a while to find one. We went to a gun show a couple of weeks later and he bought a minty used one. They do pop up from time to time.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I have decided to take a chance on this one in 32 ACP--a Zastava M70 from RGuns, for $225:

92946

Unissued "new old stock" --two magazines, a holster and a bore brush...and loads of cosmoline!!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Will do. Check out sootch00's review on YouTube. I've got a lot of 32 ACP ammo around that I'd like to dispose of, if you know what I mean. So this pistol will give me the opportunity...I will still be keeping my eyes out on a Walther in 7.65 but will be in no hurry to over-pay for one...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Guess I was lucky on the price of my W Germany pistol, likewise on the 1910, nothing like a Ft Smith pistol price. Fact is, as I saw on Lucky Gunner's website where he tested the .32, VERY few people buy .32s today compared to .380s...some pretty informative statistics, which I can't remember. I doubt Ft. Smith will ever make a .32 for sale; demand for all steel .32s in PPK size just isn't there. Since they import the slides from Germany, I guess Walther USA could get .32 slides/barrels, but why bother?
Nonsense. The blowback operation pistols are made for .32 acp and smaller calibers. The .380 is simply too big with too much recoil. The new PPK’s have more felt recoil than a .357 Lcr that I own. The .32 is more than adequate for defense too. The fact that old .32 acp’s are hard to find tells you something about demand. The PPK’s don’t measure up at all with the old ones in .32. Walther was stupid to not reissue the PPK in .32, in my opinion, and that doesn’t even factor into consideration the historical significance of the .32 acp caliber.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
A lot of talk about how the .380 is just as good or better. Sorry, not true. The .32 is a much softer shooter in this gun and the original caliber. Still popular in Europe, but unfortunately not here. Score a German made used one and you will be most happy. I am lucky enough to have two from Germany and one I ordered from S & W. I collect .32's and know this is a great caliber.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
I don't understand the problem some have with the .380 recoil. Is it stronger than a .32? Yes. Is it painful? Not unless you have dishwater hands. Certainly nothing like a .357 in any of my revolvers in that caliber and they're all-steel. (Are you serious, Jensen, or offering a hyperbole to make a point?) My .380 PPK is more accurate than my .32. Both rounds were designed by J.M. Browning before the PP pistols were invented, so any doubts as to either's heritage or capability is specious. I'm recoil sensitive and I don't find the .380s I have as punishing in the recoil department. More fun to shoot the .32, yes, especially if you envision a 100 round range trip, more fun still to shoot a .22, but I like the .380...a lot. And it's way more popular. Lucky Gunner studied the buying habits of these two and it's 1:110 for sales. Only 3 or 4 manufacturers make a .32 for sale in the USA; Seacamp, Beretta, KelTec, and one more I can't remember. And I don't know about the Seacamp any more. I carry my PPK .32 and have confidence in it, but no more confidence than in my .380s.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
It's not the age so much as it's the price they are going for. I figured if the Fort Smith unit would offer that caliber it wouldn't be so costly. A lot of the used 32s out there are wartime production and the last thing I'll ever own is a pistol with Nazi provenance.
There have been many commercial .32 acp Walthers made but why would you even want one when the commercial guns in .380 acp outnumber the .32 acp pistols in the U.S? Expanding ammo is much more readily available and in a much wider range of bullet styles than the .32 acp. What is strange about the .32 acp is that there have been few expanding bullets made in the original full weight 71 grain bullet. What is offered is the lighter 60 grain bullets that have less penetration and less reliability during the feeding cycle because of their shorter overall length which often results in jams or even worse in rim lock. Remember the .32 acp is a rimmed cartridge unlike the .380 that is rimless and does not suffer from rimlock. I can tell you trying to un-jam a rim locked magazine is a nightmare to behold. To further complicate the picture the .32 acp expanding bullets seem to be way less reliable in expansion than the .380 caliber bullets available.

If you do buy one of either caliber make sure "it is not made in the U.S." the only reliable ones I ever owned were either made in Germany or made in France. My friends have had much the same problems when they bought U.S. made Walthers as well. The good news is that many Wather PP variants have been carried much and shot seldom so buying a beat up one does not necessarily mean its ready for the bone yard. I bought one such gun and had it electrolysis nickle plated and it was totally reliable and it was not made in the U.S. rather it was German made.

Now I come to the bad news. If you are a collector or just want one because of its workmanship and history and want to fork over some big cash to get a German or French made one by all means get one but if you are actually looking for a concealed carry gun there are so many modern lightweight baby 9mm guns out there it really makes the Walther PP series a real dinosaur. Because of its weight it is no where near as comfortable to carry as a modern and much cheaper in price plasticky pistol. Yes I know that if you are a connoisseur of fine pistols you will puke at the sight of a plasticky pistol but they have their practical side. They are crudely and cheaply made tools and nothing more and if they get confiscated by the cops in a traffic stop or you lose one or it gets stolen you are out less money and the gun companies vomit them out every day so getting another is no big deal.

I know the .32 acp is a much more pleasant gun to shoot because it has way less recoil than a .380 and if you are going to use it as a range gun then go for the .32 acp but if you are going to carry it as a defense gun the .380 is going to be a much more reliable gun and supposedly a more lethal one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Got a .32 PPK that's 50 YOA and don't see a problem with it. Got a FN 1910 that's 100 years old, likewise no problem. Don't quite understand concerns over the age on a quality steel pistol...they age well.
I fully agree. I have a PP in .32 that dates 1977, a Walter Olympia from 1932, and a P38 from 1960. All are very dependable. Note that I bought all three in good condition, not heavily worn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
I think that Walther should do a special run of faithful copies of the 1950s era PPKs in .32 marketed as, the “Limited James Bond” model. Ok, I know this character is fiction etc., and the idea might seem dumb to some, but speaking for myself, the whole initial interest in a Walther PPK came from the movie/book icon. I now have several Manurhin PPKs and a PP in .32 and love them! I did also find a ‘73 PPK in .380 in nickel finish. I put one of those little rubber grip sleeves on it and that eliminated the snappiness. Love it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
208 Posts
I got rim lock once, had to dismantle the magazine. Lucky Gunner says it's nearly impossible to get rim lock with ball ammo, happens with HP because it's generally shorter giving the ability to load with rims in the wrong place. I only shoot ball ammo from my .32 and .380. As for penetration, per L Gunner and his ballistic gel tests, if you get expansion, it limits penetration below the desired 12" in most cases. Only one of the .32 loads tested got penetration + expansion, Hornady Critical Defense, but I don't shoot them. I'll go for ball ammo for reliability and price.

There are LOTS of superior rounds to the .32 acp in smaller, reliable pistols, but for me, that's not the point. The .32 is "good enough." For me, at least. If I was going into a dangerous area, I'd carry a bigger gun, but that ain't gonna happen. The .380 is superior, but not all that much superior. I like mine because my wife gave me a PPK/S for Christmas in 1983 or so, and I got my PPK in SS last year, and both are very accurate. Again, the dangerous area rule applies: stay away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
I got rim lock once, had to dismantle the magazine. Lucky Gunner says it's nearly impossible to get rim lock with ball ammo, happens with HP because it's generally shorter giving the ability to load with rims in the wrong place. I only shoot ball ammo from my .32 and .380. As for penetration, per L Gunner and his ballistic gel tests, if you get expansion, it limits penetration below the desired 12" in most cases. Only one of the .32 loads tested got penetration + expansion, Hornady Critical Defense, but I don't shoot them. I'll go for ball ammo for reliability and price.

There are LOTS of superior rounds to the .32 acp in smaller, reliable pistols, but for me, that's not the point. The .32 is "good enough." For me, at least. If I was going into a dangerous area, I'd carry a bigger gun, but that ain't gonna happen. The .380 is superior, but not all that much superior. I like mine because my wife gave me a PPK/S for Christmas in 1983 or so, and I got my PPK in SS last year, and both are very accurate. Again, the dangerous area rule applies: stay away.
Lucky Gunner says it's nearly impossible to get rim lock with ball ammo, -----------------------QUOTE

I was able to produce rim lock in about 2 seconds with ball ammo. If you load the magazine in a hurry and the top round's rim gets pushed past the bottom rounds rim they lock up instantly. In other words rim lock just does not happen in the firing cycle but will happen in the loading of the magazine as well and if it is not caught by operator loading the magazine the upper rounds may feed and fire until the locked two rounds come up to be fed into the chamber. This does not happen with all magazines and all types of ammo because there has to be enough room in the magazine to push the rest of the rounds down into the magazine. It happens most often when loading the short 60 grain expanding bullets in older weapons that have full length magazines but again it can happen even with 71 grain full metal jacketed bullets. This has been well known in Europe for decades.

With all the headaches you encounter with the .32 acp its not my first choice as a favorite hideout caliber. Most people are shocked if they bother to take a big hunk of meat and wrap a few layers of old bluejeans around it and then fire a .32 expanding bullet into it. Many times even the name brand ammo fails to expand.

The good news with the .32 acp is that with fmj bullets it way out penetrates the .380 with fmj bullets. The German Army adopted the .32 acp over the .380 because the .32 acp would penetrate a military helmet while the .380 bounced off of it. The same was true of the 9mm v/s the 45 acp. The .45 acp failed miserably by failing to penetrate a military helmet and bounced off at 35 yards while the 9mm penetrated it at an astonishing 125 yards and may have done so even further away than that but no one succeeded in hitting the helmet beyond 125 yards (see the book the Inglis Diamond). Its one of the major reasons European countries (except Denmark) roundly rejected adopting the .45 acp as a combat pistol caliber.
 
1 - 20 of 40 Posts
Top