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CCP M2 -- I had it come off the first time I broke down the gun to clean it. It flew across the room and could not find it. Had to call Walther to get replacement. Does anyone else find this a bad design idea? Would like to know if anyone else has had issues with this.
 

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I think someone mentioned having that happen a fe threads back. Warning to everyone that a thumb or something should retain the part in place until spring pressure is relieved. Does the manual make any specific recommendation regarding keeping the striker spring under control while dismounting the slide? 1917
 

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Yep, happened to me too. I had the guys at the range look at it and they ordered the new spring - because it came out the back - but they didn't say anything else so I need to get over there and look it over to see if anything else is missing. I'm reading today that the new CCPs are difficult to reassemble after takedown. I hadn't seen anything about this until today. I really hope it fixes easily, I would like to keep it but can't if it isn't reliable.
 

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I thought I had lost that spring too. It bounced off a garage wall and luckily landed on a box near the wall. I looked for 20 minutes because I heard where it hit and tried to imagine where it rebounded. I was looking on the floor and it was no where to be seen. Frustrating!! :mad:
 

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I think the problem is with the striker spring. I have a new cap , which is red, that they sent me, but it fell off also. I also believe that the striker spring is the probable cause
of the lousy, crunchy, stagey, trigger pull. Way to go Walther, maybe you should glue it on.
 

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My cap was red while my friends cap is black. Both guns are brand new and purchased within tow days of each other but at different delers. Does anyone know if there is a difference between the two. I suspect that they jsut changed colors to make it easier to find once it fies ot of your pistol.

If anyone comes up with a suitable fix for this I'd love to hear it. I've consider tightening up the spring radius on the last loop to make it grab that piece harder. Some sort of glue suited for a job like this might also be a workable fix.
 

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If you have two CCPs you will likely be the best source for observing any differences between the two. How about a really good picture of the two....perhaps striker spring still installed in the channel with the two rubber ends in place and a good, sharp picture of the two rubber pieces removed from the rear of the spring and laid out side by side. Kinda hard to diagnose/comment over the net without pictures. Gun in hand...not too hard.

I know you are supposed to unload the pistol, pull the trigger to let the striker fly forward which is supposed to relieve some of the spring pressure before trying to remove the slide. I suppose everyone is doing that. Since I don't know the purpose of the small part it is hard to comment on the design. Photos??? 1917
 

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No need to pull the trigeer to break down the CCP M2.

I ordered several of the plastic end peices from Walther. The ones they sent me are red like the ones in my particular pistol. My friends CCP M2 has a black one in it. I am going to send him one of mine to see if there is a difference between the two. I suspect that they've jsut changed colors so as to make the red one easier to find than the black one might be but we willl see.

In the meantime, I have taken my pistol apart enough to have learned to handle that spring in a manner so as to keep that plastic end piece from flying off.

For those who have yet to experience loosing the end piece the good news is that is doesn't go far. The first two times mine came off I assumed that it had flown all over the room and searched and searched for it only to find it laying at my feet. No more than 2 feet away.
 

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I was having a problem with the trigger bar not engaging. (More on that in a second.)
So that left me with a pistol I could empty but no amount of jiggering around let me release the striker. So I had to disassemble it with the striker cocked, which means the spring is compressed. Well when I opened the rear (new model no-tool takedown) the spring spontaneously escaped and the little cap reached escape velocity and had it not been for the basement wall it would still be in orbit around Uranus. Since I heard it hit, I searched in that area. 20 minutes later I found it inside a shoe about 15 feet away by the stairs. I just thought everyone would enjoy that little pratfall story. From now on I will use my third hand to cup my spare palm over that area whenever I open up the back of the gun. Most particularly if something happens and the trigger refuses to engage again.

As to why the trigger refused to engage: second trip to the range testing for the same problem. I consider the trigger refusing to work a Bad Thing. I was ready to send it back for repair. Then I read more forums and viewed some videos of how the whole pistol works. That prompted me to take it apart again and start really looking closely at how it works. I think I outsmarted myself when I first got the gun last week. It came from the box a little dirty, probably from test firing. So I cleaned it and lubed it. I was concerned about the sloppiness of the little post that pushes the trigger bar up, so I placed a microscopic dab of red grease on it with a syringe before packing it up for its first range trip. Whether or not that was the cause, what I found was gunk between the trigger bar and the cylinder that was stopping the trigger bar from being raised so it could hook onto and rotate that cylinder. A little meticulous attention to that area and now I can't make it not work. I figure maybe a tiny amount of grease got under there and normal fouling made it cake up. I'll take the blame for it if that's how it got under there and I'll wear the dunce hat for over-lubrication. Going back to the range today to verify that it's sorted. Maybe this is the wrong thread for it but from now on that's a place to check if anyone has their trigger stop grabbing on them.

So that's the story of how a tiny dab of grease almost launched the plastic spring cap into orbit.
 

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Oh, one more thing: I have the black cap, and it fits tightly inside the spring. It's even a little difficult to get it in there. It stays put nicely under normal conditions. But if it ever sproings, it's going to launch anyway. If it's going to stay there under launch conditions some different design would be required.
 

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Wyatt, I'd say if you cleaned off the grease and the spring and plunger began to lift the trigger bar properly then that was the issue. I don't use grease on anything that can in anyway collect spent bits of lead, burnt powder, etc. Light oil, very light oil. On the zinc P22 I've been using "dry" powdered moly for years...no oil of any kind and the pistol will still get dirty but not like it would if oil or grease was used for a lubricant. Oh yeah, welcome Wyatt.

So bkelley, what changed about the M2 that you would not release the striker to relax the spring before dismounting the slide. The original purpose as I understand it was that the rear of the spring assembly had to be pressed in so it would clear the counter plate hook and since the striker spring was almost compressed solid when the striker was cocked that made it pretty difficult to press the rear assembly in. The new one apparently doesn't require pressing anything in but wouldn't it be better if compression of the spring was reduced? I don't know, just asking. The spring isn't captive I take it from the launch stories. 1917
 

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Wyatt, I'd say if you cleaned off the grease and the spring and plunger began to lift the trigger bar properly then that was the issue. I don't use grease on anything that can in anyway collect spent bits of lead, burnt powder, etc. Light oil, very light oil. On the zinc P22 I've been using "dry" powdered moly for years...no oil of any kind and the pistol will still get dirty but not like it would if oil or grease was used for a lubricant. Oh yeah, welcome Wyatt.

So bkelley, what changed about the M2 that you would not release the striker to relax the spring before dismounting the slide. The original purpose as I understand it was that the rear of the spring assembly had to be pressed in so it would clear the counter plate hook and since the striker spring was almost compressed solid when the striker was cocked that made it pretty difficult to press the rear assembly in. The new one apparently doesn't require pressing anything in but wouldn't it be better if compression of the spring was reduced? I don't know, just asking. The spring isn't captive I take it from the launch stories. 1917
I am not familiar with the original CCP so I can't answer that question. I assumed that they were very similar only you had to use a special tool to get it apart.

What dry film lubricant do you use if you don't mind me asking.
 

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The original CCP had a part on the rear called the counter plate. It was essentially a forward facing hook pinned to the rear system housing. When assembled the rear of the striker spring assembly fit into the hook. To dismount the slide it was necessary to unload the pistol, pull the trigger to release the striker, press in the rear of the spring assembly in order to release it from the hook. At that point the rear of the slide could be lifted and let forward off the pistol. There are no rails on the CCP. The front of the slide is held in position by the fixed barrel and the rear is held by the striker spring in the striker spring channel with the rear of the spring being held in place. This would seem to not be the strongest design to hit the market. All the tool did was lift a lightweight clip in order for the rear of the spring to be pressed in appx 1/4".

On steel pistols I use a very small amount of oil. Sometimes Hoppes #9 or more often another well known light weight oil. Rails, guide rod, barrel lock up, etc. On the P22 which has a cast zinc slide and frame wear can be critical between the slide grooves and frame rails. Oil and grease can collect spent powder and other abrasive debris and make a lapping compound. Way, way back I was given some dry, powdered moly by a gunsmith to try. This completely stopped wear. He said he got it from a military helicopter maintenance service man. So, I don't know exactly what it is. But KG Gun lubricants sells what appears to be the exact same thing. What they call a gun grade dry moly. It is a fine powder. KG-G7????? I rub it on critical wear areas with a Q Tip. It looks like graphite. It will not build up so there is no point in trying to make it do so. It is not a new product in any way for use on firearms.

I have a 2007 P22 frame and can tell you that after 40K or 50K rounds the rails still measure as they did when new. This was not so with my first P22 which was greased and oiled and had worn out rails by 8,000 rounds. If I had a CCP I would give the cylinder a good cleaning, blow it out with compressed air and work some of this dry powdered moly into the cylinder. The stuff is really slippery and since it is dry doesn't collect debris in a sticky mess. This might help keep the trigger cylinder lubricated and cleaner. It also might benefit the striker spring and channel. Perhaps the gas cylinder and keep it cleaner. Gas pressure is responsible for the delay. Not lubrication but the very thin, dry coating keeps things cleaner. 1917
 

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The original CCP had a part on the rear called the counter plate. It was essentially a forward facing hook pinned to the rear system housing. When assembled the rear of the striker spring assembly fit into the hook. To dismount the slide it was necessary to unload the pistol, pull the trigger to release the striker, press in the rear of the spring assembly in order to release it from the hook. At that point the rear of the slide could be lifted and let forward off the pistol. There are no rails on the CCP. The front of the slide is held in position by the fixed barrel and the rear is held by the striker spring in the striker spring channel with the rear of the spring being held in place. This would seem to not be the strongest design to hit the market. All the tool did was lift a lightweight clip in order for the rear of the spring to be pressed in appx 1/4".

On steel pistols I use a very small amount of oil. Sometimes Hoppes #9 or more often another well known light weight oil. Rails, guide rod, barrel lock up, etc. On the P22 which has a cast zinc slide and frame wear can be critical between the slide grooves and frame rails. Oil and grease can collect spent powder and other abrasive debris and make a lapping compound. Way, way back I was given some dry, powdered moly by a gunsmith to try. This completely stopped wear. He said he got it from a military helicopter maintenance service man. So, I don't know exactly what it is. But KG Gun lubricants sells what appears to be the exact same thing. What they call a gun grade dry moly. It is a fine powder. KG-G7????? I rub it on critical wear areas with a Q Tip. It looks like graphite. It will not build up so there is no point in trying to make it do so. It is not a new product in any way for use on firearms.

I have a 2007 P22 frame and can tell you that after 40K or 50K rounds the rails still measure as they did when new. This was not so with my first P22 which was greased and oiled and had worn out rails by 8,000 rounds. If I had a CCP I would give the cylinder a good cleaning, blow it out with compressed air and work some of this dry powdered moly into the cylinder. The stuff is really slippery and since it is dry doesn't collect debris in a sticky mess. This might help keep the trigger cylinder lubricated and cleaner. It also might benefit the striker spring and channel. Perhaps the gas cylinder and keep it cleaner. Gas pressure is responsible for the delay. Not lubrication but the very thin, dry coating keeps things cleaner. 1917
Thanks for the tip on dry film lubricants. I am familiar with them since I worked for the comapny that invented the whole category of dry film lubricants which I currenlty use. However I've been looking for one that was more specifically designed for guns. I looked up the KG-10 luricants you recommended and that looks very good. I also ran across another one called Sentry Solutions They make several products that look interesting. I will try one or two of these in the near future. Thanks again.
 

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The one I use is KG-7. Dry powder. There are various spray on moly lubes but none of them worked well for me. The carrier is always sticky. The KG 7 is a fine powder....nothing wet. I apply it with a Q Tip directly to parts that need lubricating. A little bit last a long time...no point in trying to apply it to make a thick coating. I'm told it won't build up. It actually separates the metal from rubbing on the other metal...like between the rails and grooves. I don't think it would be of benefit for preventing rust on a steel pistol. I don't have a problem with rust anyway. They also offer a dry powder teflon. I have heard of people mixing the two. Teflon is slick. Moly is slick. Moly is a good sliding motion lubricant...I'm told it is not the best lubricant for something like ball bearings or roller bearings. Some shooters coat their ammo with it. I never have. 1917

https://shop.kgcoatings.com/kg/product/kg-7-moly-powder/
 

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The new model has what's the equivalent of the counter plate in the same place; it's what the rear of the striker spring pushes against. When the assembly lock is released, the counter plate comes back a little and it's then that the rear of the spring escapes through the opening and that's what launches the cap. The spring stays put. It only happens if you have to open the gun with the striker cocked. (Try not to do that.)

The counter plate or whatever they call it now is shaped sort of like a lollipop in cross section when viewed from the front or back. The slide wraps around that and that's what retains the rear of the slide.

I use Hornady One Shot case lube. It's carried in a solvent that evaporates leaving a dry lube behind. A member of one of the forums did a test of everything he could find on the shelf and it won the contest for slickness and rust protection, so I tried it and it works. For dissolving powder residue nothing beats good ole' Hoppes #9 and a nylon brush. I get it all loosened with that and rinse it away with a blast of brake cleaner outside. When it dries it gets a shot of case lube and wiped off. I think it saves time and effort compared to the various things I used to use and it works for lube and protection so far.

I can't prove that tiny dab of grease I outsmarted myself with migrated back there to where the hook is on the end of the trigger bar, and I can't prove it didn't. It may have been some powder fouling I missed that actually absorbed the lube or something. Nonetheless, dirt under there was the culprit. I dissolved it with a little Kroil, then gave it my usual treatment and went to the range. Two hundred rounds and no issues whatsoever. So I consider the matter sorted, and myself ever so slightly wiser, if such a thing were possible.

Now I just have to adjust the sights a little and work on discipline to get my accuracy better. I can't complain about the double action trigger on this one, it's better than the three or fours others I've got. I just have to get used to it, the way it fits my hand and where the break is and all that. (I have the same issue with the little Glock 42. So small and light and by the time it clicks who knows where I'm pointing it.)

So far I'm satisfied with the value I got from this gun. At least it makes scary noises dependably now as long as I don't do anything too stupid, even if my target is the only thing downrange that is safe.

Thanks for the warm welcome, and Merry Christmas!
 

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The one I use is KG-7. Dry powder. There are various spray on moly lubes but none of them worked well for me. The carrier is always sticky. The KG 7 is a fine powder....nothing wet. I apply it with a Q Tip directly to parts that need lubricating. A little bit last a long time...no point in trying to apply it to make a thick coating. I'm told it won't build up. It actually separates the metal from rubbing on the other metal...like between the rails and grooves. I don't think it would be of benefit for preventing rust on a steel pistol. I don't have a problem with rust anyway. They also offer a dry powder teflon. I have heard of people mixing the two. Teflon is slick. Moly is slick. Moly is a good sliding motion lubricant...I'm told it is not the best lubricant for something like ball bearings or roller bearings. Some shooters coat their ammo with it. I never have. 1917

https://shop.kgcoatings.com/kg/product/kg-7-moly-powder/
Moly works like this: If you look at metal under a microscope, even finely finished pieces it will look like a mountain range with very pointed mountain tops. What moly does is fill in the valleys betweeen the peaks. With that the peaks in the mating surfaces can no longer engage with each other.

Moly itself is a flat platelet molecule with each molecule being ale to slide easily against the surrounding molecules. This is how it works as a lubricant.

It also adheres very well to the metal surfaces of anything it needs to lubricate. In this way it basically plates the surfaces of the metal. Adding anything to it usually diminishes it's abilty to bond to the metal since materials like graphite or teflon make those surfaces slick. Anytime you see those products included it's basically a marketing scheme to make the lubicant sell since it looks like you are adding to it's effectiveness by adding yet another component. In this case 1 + 1 doesn't equal 2. It equals something less than 1.

Moly, like evertyhting else has a life cycle. If you use it in slow moving points of friction it will last a long, long time. If you add it to something like a high speed bearing it won't last nearly as long. On slower moving bearings it's fine.

True dry film lubricants are ideal for something like a gun slide. Just the fact that it is dry is one of it's best features since it won't attract gun residue. Any wetting agents will basically take the gun residue and combine with it to form a lapping compound. I don't know how abrasive gun residue is but I suspect it's abrasive enough to cuase real problems. It seems obvious that cleaning your gun woudl remoe the abrasive nature of the debris and that is why your gun will run better.

The problem is finding it in it's in a dry state with out any additives that may interfere. Adding a wetting agent also has its benefits since that will make it migrate into areas that you can't reach easily. The trouble with that is finding one that works correctly. Many of them don't. Finding the right one is what I am looking for. So far Sentry Solutions and KG are the only was I might try.

There's more to all of this than I've mentioned here but this should be a good start for most people.
 

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Another older thread but glad I came and found all the helpful dry lubricant comments. On the subject of that little plastic black (or red?) cap (which I wonder how the pistol would behave without) mine was loose and almost fell to the floor upon my first field strip. Further thought caused me to try to screw the nipple of the cap inside the end of the striker spring as though the spring itself were threads. That attempt was successful after a little careful manipulation and now that cap seems to be secure. Anyone still having that problem ?
 
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