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Always a good idea to clean and lube first. If shipped similar to my HKs, they're generally lathered in cosmoline or similar.


Slip 2000 EWL and MPro7 gun cleaner work best for me....the Slip2k makes it so easy to clean, most all just wipes off with a paper towel or patch.
 

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Walther's video on field stripping, cleaning, and the dangers of loud music on a video:

youtube.com/watch?v=dJUQNzUGMTY

hickok45's no-nonsense take on cleaning:

youtube.com/watch?v=DZf4mUM10Vc

Ballistol is non-toxic, smells nice, and makes sense on a Walther. Here's the safety data sheet:
http://www.ballistol.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/MSDS_TECH_BIO.pdf


I blackened a few cotton patches cleaning the gun the first time.
 

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I've seen a few brand new pistols that had defects that could be considered dangerous. Within the past few years, I've seen one pistol that had rust inside the chamber and rifling, and another hammer fired pistol that had the area of sear engagement so small that pushing hard on the hammer would allow it to drop. My gunsmith has told me about many more of these types of instances, with one including a pistol with a crooked barrel.

I'd always suggest cleaning the pistol first, more for inspection than anything else, but if you are taking the pistol apart anyway, why not clean and lube it as well.
 

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I've seen a few brand new pistols that had defects that could be considered dangerous. Within the past few years, I've seen one pistol that had rust inside the chamber and rifling, and another hammer fired pistol that had the area of sear engagement so small that pushing hard on the hammer would allow it to drop. My gunsmith has told me about many more of these types of instances, with one including a pistol with a crooked barrel.


I'd always suggest cleaning the pistol first, more for inspection than anything else, but if you are taking the pistol apart anyway, why not clean and lube it as well.
I agree with this. This is something I used to do but got away from in the last few years. That bit me in the ash though with a PPQsc a bought a few months ago.

I shot the gun without cleaning and lubing it. The gun cycled and ejected erratically. I was pretty concerned as PPQs I purchased previous to that had run so well.

After stripping the gun, thourougly cleaning and then living it, it started running like a top.

It was a silly mistake on my part and I should have known better. Lesson relearned.
 

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The Walther video which abuwf linked to is a good one.


OP, a quick suggestion is that you smell Ballistol before buying it. Some people like it, some tolerate it while many others think it stinks horribly bad. Count me in that last group. It is almost gagging to me.


I currently have an even dozen gun lubricants and five gun greases on my workbench. Ballistol is the one I will never buy again solely because of the stink. When I made several valiant attempts to clean my guns with Ballistol my wife would not even come into the garage. I now use it ONLY on things that might need lubricant outside the house, garage or basement.


Just a suggestion.
 

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The Walther video which abuwf linked to is a good one.


OP, a quick suggestion is that you smell Ballistol before buying it. Some people like it, some tolerate it while many others think it stinks horribly bad. Count me in that last group. It is almost gagging to me.


I currently have an even dozen gun lubricants and five gun greases on my workbench. Ballistol is the one I will never buy again solely because of the stink. When I made several valiant attempts to clean my guns with Ballistol my wife would not even come into the garage. I now use it ONLY on things that might need lubricant outside the house, garage or basement.


Just a suggestion.

Most modern products (well, those I chose to use) are non-toxic and little to no odor. Hoppes 9 and Ballistol both have some odor, which some like and some are repulsed by.


With my GSDs and the like, I prefer the non-toxic no/low odor cleaning products and technology has evolved since Ballistol invented.


YMMV
 

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For a long time new guns were all metal with several machined parts. You would often find metal shavings inside. This was particularly true with revolvers which required a lot of work on the frame itself. Today many of the pistols today have polymer frame and pressed formed internals, which don’t require much rework and generally are free of machining debris. Still it doesn’t hurt to break down the gun and get familiar with the internals.

Everyone has a favorite cleaning product, I like a product called Shooters Choice which works really well with out a terrible smell. It is not easy to find in local stores but I generally can find it on Amazon.
 
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