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Discussion Starter #1
Stopped hitting the primer in the middle of a range session. No amount of unscientific fiddling would fix it.

Bought new. Approx 9 months & 2500 rounds. All "gentle" range time. All factory, FMJ ammo. No oil near the firing pin.

Disappointed.

j.e.b.
 

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That is unacceptable, send it back to Walther.
 

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happened to me once but that was because a shaving wedged in the firing pin hole so that the pin would only come out so much and get stuck. cleaned it out and been good since.
 

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Don't you guys "read" your brass?

When any pistol misfires (i.e., the trigger is pressed, and the hammer or striker falls but the cartridge does not fire), the first step is not to pull the trigger again. (If you do, and it fires, that simply masks the problem until it gets worse and the gun won't fire at all.)

Eject the cartridge and examine the primer for the presence of a firing pin indent.

If there is a weak indent or none, there are only four possible causes:

1) The firing pin channel is obstructed with debris, or

2) The firing pin safety block --if the pistol has one-- is not fully disengaging when the trigger is pressed, or

3) The firing pin is broken or jammed, or

4) Adequate energy is not being delivered to the hammer or striker.

By far the most common is No. 1.

Closely examine the primer indent of your fired cartridge cases under magnification. If the indent shows cratering around the circumference, the primer is extruding back into the firing pin hole in the breech face, and some of it is being shaved off as the barrel drops down to unlock. Those shavings wind up in the firing pin channel of the slide. Enough shavings will slow down or jam the firing pin, and may also jam the firing pin block.

Different results will be seen with different ammunition and from one individual gun to another, but one common contributor to primer extrusion is the substitution of a lighter striker spring, which some people imagine is a cheap trigger job with no downside. Well, welcome to the real world...there is no free lunch.

M
 

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OP, I'd at least field strip, and check out the slide, see if there's foreign material in, on, or around the firing pin. It may just be dirty, or something may be broke. I'd rather find a piece of crud in there, than send it to Walther and pay them to clean it, and have to pay to send it back. It's a handgun, not the Space Shuttle. ;)

one common contributor to primer extrusion is the substitution of a lighter striker spring, which some people imagine is a cheap trigger job with no downside. Well, welcome to the real world...there is no free lunch.

M
Yes, and one thing worth considering; if it's a range only gun, one in which you'd not need to rely on in a defensive use, the only thing you'd be out would be the time spent clearing out the issue.

On a defensive firearm however....how many people have been in a defensive shoot, and while they were squeezing the trigger, trying to stay alive, thinking "oh damn, this trigger is horrible, heavy, and gritty! Maybe I should put in a @lock spring to give my finger a break!"?

FWIW, I did swap in a PPQ striker spring into my PPS.. After that, I ran 250 rounds of WWB, 150 rds Remington, and cleaned out the last of Hornady Critical Defense..all with no issue. Of course, I don't think there's much of a difference in the springs between those two pistols, other than the PPQ spring is a little "finer" in diameter, and so feels less scratchy when the PPS is fired.

If I felt that after 473 rounds, it wasn't reliable, I wouldn't carry it.

However, putting a 3.5# trigger spring into a PPQ, for example, is simply asking for trouble at a very inopportune time. Just my opinion. Carry on. :)

Oh yeah, last night I deep cleaned my PPS, it's been 6 months since the last. There was crud, dust, lint, fiber from work pants, saw dust, and I think I even saw one willy worm down inside. (kidding about the willy worm).

I braved the 8 degree temps, ran out to the shop and used compressed air to blow the frame out.

Think I will make sure to hit it with air a little more often, though I didn't have any issues with it. Peace of mind, mostly. Nobody buys car insurance, expecting to have to make a claim. ;)
 

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a bit off topic here... but how does one do a cleaning other then field stripping it? Like cleaning the firing pin chamber? I wouldnt mind doing this, as its seen 1500 rounds and all i have done is field strip, clean and lube... wouldnt mind making sure mine is all good...
 

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Had that problem about 3 days ago at range got the gun Smith at range to look at it an it was just a piece of trash in the firing pin chamber only took about 10 mins to fix hope this helps
 

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I have a very small sample size, only two range trips and 140 rounds or so, but my PPX works like a dream. Yesterday at the range I was showing it and discussing things with a couple gentlemen, when one of them handed me a steel-jacketed round that had failed to fire in another gun. You could clearly see the hammer strike. Now I haven't run any steel jackets through mine and I'm not planning on it either, but I popped it in the top of the mag, chambered it, and it fired just like it should (although it was a flyer for sure). Guess it wasn't bad primer.

I'm glad people keep updating this thread, and I wlll certainly give the firing pin area a good cleaning every time, but I'm just not too concerned with MY PPX at this point, nor the species as a whole. Problem guns should be returned, and the rest will go on firing away happily.

Not all machines are created equal, much as we might wish it so. That's why God invented gunsmiths.

fwiw
 
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