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I'm thinking of buying some milsurp ammo from 1946. Think I should rotate it? Maybe just turn the box around in a different direction? :)
All you need to do is turn the box upside down. Let the powder settle a few days and it'll be fine.....:D
















JK.... :eek::D
 

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I'd rather use my wife's rock tumbler and let them bounce around for a week. :D
You crack me up..... I have no doubt that that'll be the way to go.:D
 

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Don't even bother, BB... they're mostly all stringy 'n tough.
 

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Leighton, I have a couple of questions concerning powder and primers and I bet your just the guy to ask. If you know the answers I'd apreciate your insight.

1. Why was old military ammo so corrosive to barrels?
2. Didn't old type boxer primers contain Mercury?
3. Why is old style blackpowder so much more corrosive to barrels than modern smokeless powder?

I think I used to know the answers to these questions but I'm getting old and I've forgotten lol
 

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Leighton, I have a couple of questions concerning powder and primers and I bet your just the guy to ask. If you know the answers I'd apreciate your insight.

1. Why was old military ammo so corrosive to barrels?
2. Didn't old type boxer primers contain Mercury?
3. Why is old style blackpowder so much more corrosive to barrels than modern smokeless powder?

I think I used to know the answers to these questions but I'm getting old and I've forgotten lol
I have a few more queries..


1. If water is the correct way to clean a corrosive-fired weapon, why are there no instruction manuals stating this in the past? I know US bore cleaner negated the use of water in WW2 ( I have some on order from E-Bay). But I don't see any manuals from the other Euro combatants stating to use water. What did they use in WW1 when everyone was using corrosive ammo? And why no pics or info from that time of water being used to clean the guns?

2. Why is some corrosive ammo more corrosive than others? I know corrosive ammo for the M1895 Nagant revolver is VERY VERY corrosive, but other stuff isn't as bad.

3. Why are some weapons that fired corrosive ammo in pristine condition in the bores, while others look like corrosive salts were actually stored in the bores and water was added to help make them corrode.



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I have a few more queries...
The salts that are left behind are what is corrosive.
Water dissolves and washes away the salts, without creating other chemical compounds that a solvent or ammonia might do.

Less corrosive, more corrosive also depends on the metal alloy of the firearm.
The existing protection on the metal such as oils or other surface treatments.
There may also be a form of galvanic corrosion occurring from the use of dissimilar metals within the firearm.

Not all ammo uses the same ingredients and or ratios of ingredients.
If a fire arm was neglected it will show.
 

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The salts that are left behind are what is corrosive.
Water dissolves and washes away the salts, without creating other chemical compounds that a solvent or ammonia might do ...
Then why has Windex with amonia been the SOP for cleaning corrosive ammo? :confused:

"Hatcher's Notebook covers the topic of cleaning up after corrosive primers by saying water is sufficient. Many shooters frown on using water but accordiung to the research done ammonia works just as well being chemically similar to water and able to dissolve the salts and opens the pores of the metal to some degree (ever notice the ammonia smell from some bore cleaners). Hot water works better as the heat (as a catalyst) helps to dissolve the salts. Cold water will work as well but you need to work at it longer. This research was done by the Springfield Armory (the Army's not the manufacturer) and the Bureau of Mines.

A lot of people use Windex which is basically ammonia and water. You could carry a spray bottle of water to get the same effect. There is no magic in using Windex."

Personally, I WON'T use corrosive ammo OR water in any of my firearms. This is the 21st century, not the 1800s.



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Personally, I WON'T use corrosive ammo OR water in any of my firearms. This is the 21st century, not the 1800s.
Exactly, find a firearm that is in good condition and keep it in good condition.
Using noncorrosive ammo will make this the easier way to do so.
Ammonia content in Windex is very low compared to Bore cleaners. But ammonia is also corrosive. Windex is pretty much water, very little else.
 

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Some firearms have stood the test of time and corrosion. Got me some vintage Mosin-Nagants and other guns from the old days of corrosive primers and they are still good to go. Further, finding some of the old calibers is hard and you may have to use a corrosive surplus round in something like 7.5x54mm MAS. Just clean well and oil after, like the directions instruct. No need to be a pansy about it.
 

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On the ammo rotation part of the question...I don't do it and never worry about it. As long as you store your ammo in the house in temperature-controlled situation, I don't see any reason for it. Heck, people are using ammo from WW2 and before and it is working pretty well. They have found loaded clips of 1911 ammo from WW2 and earlier and they have worked 100%. And yeah, I call them clips. Save the doofuss lecture about clips and magazines for someone who cares.:rolleyes:



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Woo HOOO!!! My unobtanium 7.62x45mm Czech ammo arrived. :D Looks like 1961 vintage, have to research the head stamps. Managed to snag 120 round for $77 +$6 shipping. WOoo Hoooo!!!!
 

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Leighton, I have a couple of questions concerning powder and primers and I bet your just the guy to ask. If you know the answers I'd apreciate your insight.

1. Why was old military ammo so corrosive to barrels?
2. Didn't old type boxer primers contain Mercury?
3. Why is old style blackpowder so much more corrosive to barrels than modern smokeless powder?

I think I used to know the answers to these questions but I'm getting old and I've forgotten lol
1. After they switched to smokeless powder, the primers still left corrosive salts after being fired. The military continued to use corrosive primers for many years after commercial ammo switched, as the corrosive priming mix was more stable and had a longer shelf life. Normally potassium chlorate was used, which leave potassium chloride (lite salt) in the barrel. The non-corrosive primers (except for "green" or lead-free) use lead styphnate.

2. VERY old primers did contain mercury. Upon firing the mercury would be driven into the brass creating an amalgam, and the brass was not suitable for reloading. Mercury fulminate was the priming compound. US Army stopped using mercury fulminate primers in 1898.

3. Black powder is a mixture of charcoal (fuel), sulfur, and potassium chloride (oxidizer). Which fired, it leaves potassium chloride (salt) in the barrel. The same as corrosive primers.
 
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