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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 1965 Walther P38 had seen very heavy use.
The rail surface on the aluminum frame that the steel slide is moving on was scraped bare.



The extractor was worn out very badly. The hook becomes a little shorter, and the curve was flat. When I bought it, it jammed once or twice every magazine. After I changed the extractor, I had never experienced any jam with brass ammo. With aluminum ammo, which is supposed to have more friction and more difficult to extract, I had one fail to extract in 50 rounds of aluminum-cased ammo.

https://www.waltherforums.com/forum...ant-fail-extract-after-thorough-cleaning.html
1968 P38 Constant Fail To Extract After Thorough Cleaning

Now, the minor issue I have with this 1965 Walther P38 is its lack of accuracy, especially considering its 4.9 inch long barrel.
The best accuracy I can accomplish is 2.8 inch and 3.2 inch at 10 meters distance.





The rear sight of Walther P38 is fixed in position by the slide cover. For reasons unknown, after I push on the slide cover and lock it securely, the rear sight can still moved easily left and right by my finger.
Under the violent recoil on the slide, I suspect that the rear sight will be shaken left and right, and cause big problems with accuracy. I would like to ask around if there is a solution to this problem.
 

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What Paul means is to return the tension on the cover plate by slightly bending it. The cover plate is notorious for being difficult to emplace properly, so if it goes on easily, it ain't going on right! Properly set, the cover plate round end clamps down on the rear sight like a tax collector on your last penny. (My apologies to all the tax collectors out there, but I live in Illinois)

However, as bending is subject to interpretation and abuse, I would recommend getting a replacement cover plate as it would likely be in the original configuration and trying with that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What Paul means is to return the tension on the cover plate by slightly bending it. The cover plate is notorious for being difficult to emplace properly, so if it goes on easily, it ain't going on right!
However, as bending is subject to interpretation and abuse, I would recommend getting a replacement cover plate as it would likely be in the original configuration and trying with that.
Thanks for all the advice.
I will buy a new cover, for about $30.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I bought slide cover that was claimed to be new and genuine parts. After I put it on, I found the sight can still be pushed by my finger left and right for a tiny bit. But the movement has resistance. So there is hope that after switching to this new slide cover, the accuracy of my Walther P38 can be improved dramatically.
 

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In order for such dispersion to be caused by a rear sight offset, it must move 0.5 mm in each direction.
This is elementary determined from the likeness of triangles.
The recoil from each shot is a blow to the gun with a heavy hammer.
If the direction of this blow does not coincide with the axis of the barrel, the weapon will turn to the side.
Try to find out why benchrest shooters attach so much importance to the quality of fitting locking parts on their rifles.
 

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While a correctly-installed top cover puts vertical force on the rear sight and clamps it down, it is not what principally prevents side-to-side movement of the sight. All that you probably accomplished with a new top cover was to increase the friction between the sight and the slide, which apparently reduced but did not eliminate the perceptible sideways drift.

There should be practically no side-to-side movement of the rear sight (in fact less than the sideways slop that can be felt between the slide and frame). What keeps the sight from moving side-to-side is the firing pin retaining pin, which projects up into the slide/sight "dovetail" and fits precisely in a slot milled into the underside of the sight. If the pin is short, bent, worn or sheared off, or if the walls of the sight slot are bent or deformed the sight is able to shift sideways, no matter how tight the top cover is.

A surprising number of sights are found to have bent, swaged out or otherwise damaged slots -- usually from some imbecile pounding on the sight trying vainly to adjust windage.

M
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
While a correctly-installed top cover puts vertical force on the rear sight and clamps it down, it is not what principally prevents side-to-side movement of the sight. All that you probably accomplished with a new top cover was to increase the friction between the sight and the slide, which apparently reduced but did not eliminate the perceptible sideways drift.

There should be practically no side-to-side movement of the rear sight (in fact less than the sideways slop that can be felt between the slide and frame). What keeps the sight from moving side-to-side is the firing pin retaining pin, which projects up into the slide/sight "dovetail" and fits precisely in a slot milled into the underside of the sight. If the pin is short, bent, worn or sheared off, or if the walls of the sight slot are bent or deformed the sight is able to shift sideways, no matter how tight the top cover is.

A surprising number of sights are found to have bent, swaged out or otherwise damaged slots -- usually from some imbecile pounding on the sight trying vainly to adjust windage.

M
That is fantastic knowledge that you share. This kind of quirks and anecdotes are exactly the charming part of classic firearms. My Walther P38 showed another layer of interests to me.
If I only seek accuracy and reliability, countless modern firearms are much better and much more affordable.
 
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