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Discussion Starter #41
Thumbing thru' Pistols of the World, and found the Smith "9mm Military and Police, Model 547." Paraphrasing, it was intended to standarize on the 9mm round, and it was based on the Model 10, but the grip curve was tightened to help deal with the heavier recoil. It wasn't popular, lasting only 5 years.

The 'more kick than expected' thing seems to have been an issue.
Moon
 

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After a few years of unsuccessful, but not very intensive search for a S&W Model 547, I have now decided to get a European alternative. It's the model 9231 of the Czech small arms manufacturer Alfa Proj. In contrast to the S&W model mentioned above, this revolver is operated with moon clips unfortunately.

Why did I buy this gun? First, I hardly have time to shoot, so I will never take advantage of the cheap 9mm ammunition. Second, I don't usually like 9mm guns anyway. Well, the only reason was actually my curiosity.

The revolver leaves a passable impression. The surface finish is not perfect and the fitting accuracy of the plastic grip plates could be better. But at least they do not move. The manual is very modest - both in its execution and at least in the poor German translation. The English text, however, is understandable.

The last photo shows that the dimensions of the 9mm revolver model is identical to the standard .357 Magnum version (Alfa Proj model 9530). Both models are available with fixed or adjustable sights.
 

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9mm Pit Bull holds 5 rounds. I have yet to find a Pit Bull holding 6 rounds.
9mm Pit Bul seems reliable. Next time that I shoot it, I will measure the required trigger force and actual mass.
The very early ones had 6 round cylinders. Very few went out before they changed to a 5 shot.

My daily carry is a Charter Arms, though I opted for the standard rimmed cartridge configuration. Given same weight and bulk, I'd as soon have the more powerful loads. For low cost practice, I just got same basic gun in .22. I have no complaints with either. I did initially have a problem with the .22, But I contacted Charter and they sent a Fed Ex prepaid return, fixed the problem, Fed Ex'd it back to me with a write up on their testing, what work they did, and details of the tests they ran to ensure it was fixed. All within 1 week.

They did recently release a 9mm Pit Bull with a 6 inch barrel and adjustable sights. Make a fun range gun.
 

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Balogh that is Revolver eye candy you got there, it reminds me of a S&W 586. Especially with that bright Orange front sight insert.
 

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After a few years of unsuccessful, but not very intensive search for a S&W Model 547, I have now decided to get a European alternative. It's the model 9231 of the Czech small arms manufacturer Alfa Proj. In contrast to the S&W model mentioned above, this revolver is operated with moon clips unfortunately.

Why did I buy this gun? First, I hardly have time to shoot, so I will never take advantage of the cheap 9mm ammunition. Second, I don't usually like 9mm guns anyway. Well, the only reason was actually my curiosity.

The revolver leaves a passable impression. The surface finish is not perfect and the fitting accuracy of the plastic grip plates could be better. But at least they do not move. The manual is very modest - both in its execution and at least in the poor German translation. The English text, however, is understandable.

The last photo shows that the dimensions of the 9mm revolver model is identical to the standard .357 Magnum version (Alfa Proj model 9530). Both models are available with fixed or adjustable sights.

Others might have seen it as well, but it appears that Rock Island Armory is going to be (or are already) importing that revolver into the country. I like the concept of having a 9mm revolver, but I think I'd prefer a heavier 3" barreled one with a hammer such as this to the Ruger LCR that I own. I had though that it might make a decent alternative CC to my PPS/M1 but have changed my mind. That LCR is likely going to be sold off soon!
 

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Well, the LCR went to an LEO today. Probably be a backup for him. I guess my experiment with revolvers is over, .....till the next time.
 

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I like 9mm revolvers but I really can’t articulate why. I have a Taurus 905 and Ruger LCR9. The issues I have with 9mm is bullet pulling...something that is worse with some rounds over others. I found that Speer Gold Dot 124 grain JHP exhibits bullet pulling to a lesser degree than a few 124 and 115 grain FMJs with which I’ve used to train.
 

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Bullets pulling

I like 9mm revolvers but I really can’t articulate why. I have a Taurus 905 and Ruger LCR9. The issues I have with 9mm is bullet pulling...something that is worse with some rounds over others. I found that Speer Gold Dot 124 grain JHP exhibits bullet pulling to a lesser degree than a few 124 and 115 grain FMJs with which I’ve used to train.

In the short time I owned the LCR, I didn't experience that at all. I only shot my own handloads in it since that was a large part of why I wanted to own one anyway; the ability to shoot darn near any kind of loads. The ones I shot were made with 115 grain lead "cone" shaped with a polymer coating. I think the polymer coating combined with the rather heavy crimp I put on it did a lot to keep the bullets in place.


We'll see if that continues to be true when I tackle another revolver some day in the future!:D
 

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I like 9mm revolvers but I really can’t articulate why. I have a Taurus 905 and Ruger LCR9. The issues I have with 9mm is bullet pulling...something that is worse with some rounds over others. I found that Speer Gold Dot 124 grain JHP exhibits bullet pulling to a lesser degree than a few 124 and 115 grain FMJs with which I’ve used to train.
I hope to stumble upon a clean Smith 940 some day. I certainly don't need it but like you, want one for reason I can't articulate.

Enjoy those revolvers.
 

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I hope to stumble upon a clean Smith 940 some day. I certainly don't need it but like you, want one for reason I can't articulate.

Enjoy those revolvers.
Thank you; they are enjoyable to shoot. I'd like a 940 too but I'll likely get a RIA AL9.0 for craps n' giggles.

I reload as well; maybe I'll try a few moonclip fulls of those to see how they do.
 

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Discussion Starter #51
Reread this thread, since it is trouble I started. Couple observations:
-The Chiappa 9mm is the best way to go if you really want to shoot a bunch of 9s in a revo. The recoil isn't an issue with the lower chamber business. The moons are snug; I made a mooning tool, and the .45 ones work to de-moon.
-Bullet pull is a real issue, especially since auto rounds are taper crimped. If you want real bullet-pull challenge, try .45s in a 625. That's Smith-speak for an alloy framed, Ti cylindered .45 revolver.
-Balog's Czech revo sounds like an item of interest, especially if it is to be imported.
Moon
 

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I looked for and found photos I took after experiencing bullet pull with my LCR9. I was wrong in that the Speer Gold Dot 124 grain JHPs (GDJHP) had minimal bullet pull; I had minimal pull with Federal HST 147 grain JHP rounds. Note, the photos: the GDJHP bullet and Federal Champion aluminum 115 grain FMJ bullet which nearly pulled out. I was able to pluck out the 115 grain bullet out of the case. Those happened after firing four rounds with the pull happening with the fifth round; neither caused cylinder bind.
 

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I get that its convenient to be able to use auto cartridges in a revolver, but that's about where it ends. From .32 to .45, you have far more effective rimmed rounds that would generally outperform the rimless rounds in any category.If you want a revolver, do yourself a favor and get one chambered for a traditional rimmed round.
 

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Discussion Starter #56
Autopistol revolvers are a personal weakness; concur in many circumstances you're better served with rimmed rounds.
That said, there are times that they do offer interesting opportunities, and I do like some of them a lot.
Both the 9mm Centennial and the .45 do offer speedy administrative reloads, and the Gummint thot' well enough of the 1917 iteration to adopt it as Government issue. The Chiappa offers both cheap ammunition and no recoil penalty.
Moon
 
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