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Charter Arms Pitbull in 9mm does not use "clips." Interesting construction of cylinder allows use of rim-less 9mm. For being a revolver, it is OK and can shoot the 9mm that do not quite pass gauge after reloading. Try one if you have a chance to do so.
Thanks Jacksprat. How well goes that Charter Arms system work? Do you find it temperamental? Finicky?
 

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How well goes that Charter Arms system work? Do you find it temperamental? Finicky?
I only have a .45 ACP Pitbull, but just in case: its mechanism works fine, but has caveats. The biggest is, because the cartridge has to push a spring-loaded extractor out of the way, using a speedloader is not possible. I use 1911 magazines to reload in place of speed strips.

The quality of the gun is somewhat questionable to me. First, the barrel is rifled using a broach, and it has ferrocious chatter marks. Second, on my example the barrel was unscrewing itself gradually when firing. Gunsmiths were unable to fix the issue, but fortunately the factory did. Third, one of the screws was not tightened. But when I tightened it, hammer jammed. Apparently they machined the hammer in the same thickness as the frame. I shimmed the revolver to allow operation with tightened screws. Overall, it's a functional novelty piece and in .45 caliber is decent snake gun. It is half the price and half the weight of Ruger Redhawk.
 

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Jimmo - 9mm PitBull: Rounds fired have been reloaded several times and some of the rims are no longer perfect. Once-in-a-while, a fired case slips past ejector star (within the cylinder).
The revolver serves a purpose and does so without having to find/have a second part(clip) in order to work.
 

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Jimmo - 9mm PitBull: Rounds fired have been reloaded several times and some of the rims are no longer perfect. Once-in-a-while, a fired case slips past ejector star (within the cylinder).
The revolver serves a purpose and does so without having to find/have a second part(clip) in order to work.
Thanks JackSprat. To me, one of the best attributes of a revolver is its reliability. I was curious if you've found the 9mm Putbull reliable. Sounds like mostly, with occasional ejection problems.

Is that a fair description?

Regards.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Full confession; the 9mm Centennial had more to do with it being a Centennial than a 9mm. Really enjoy the humpback Smiths, and this one took serious looking on Gunbroker.

Objectively, the caliber in a revo can claim cheap ammo, and speedy reloads via the moonclips. These clips don't work overmuch well with longer cases, like a .38/.357. A charged 9mm moon slaps right in, just like a .45. The loaded moons are great for administrative loading/unloading.

The brass remains fine for reloading.

On the downside, there is the mooning/demooning business; extra moons (not cheap) are necessary before a range session. There is reputedly a 9mm AutoRim available, but I won't be shooting enough to justify the extra brass and inventory.

In the J-frame, recoil is surprisingly brisk, especially compared to a similar-weight auto.

My Centennial is part of what prompted friends to get their own versions.
Recoil is the downside to the idea; it just kicks more than it seems it should.
Moon
 

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Never considered a wheel gun in 9mm. I reload 38,357 & 44 so cost of ammo doesn't come into play. I wouldn't have thought a heavier gun like the Ruger would of had to much recoil
 

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Discussion Starter #28
... I wouldn't have thought a heavier gun like the Ruger would of had to much recoil
Not sure of the Ruger's model number, but it is one of the partially poly, not especially heavy examples.
I reload as well, tho' I've found throweight of the projectile is the major expense.
Moon
 

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9mm Pit Bull holds 5 rounds. I have yet to find a Pit Bull holding 6 rounds.
9mm Pit Bul seems reliable. Next time that I shoot it, I will measure the required trigger force and actual mass.
 

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Full confession; the 9mm Centennial had more to do with it being a Centennial than a 9mm. Really enjoy the humpback Smiths, and this one took serious looking on Gunbroker.

Objectively, the caliber in a revo can claim cheap ammo, and speedy reloads via the moonclips. These clips don't work overmuch well with longer cases, like a .38/.357. A charged 9mm moon slaps right in, just like a .45. The loaded moons are great for administrative loading/unloading.

The brass remains fine for reloading.

On the downside, there is the mooning/demooning business; extra moons (not cheap) are necessary before a range session. There is reputedly a 9mm AutoRim available, but I won't be shooting enough to justify the extra brass and inventory.

In the J-frame, recoil is surprisingly brisk, especially compared to a similar-weight auto.

My Centennial is part of what prompted friends to get their own versions.
Recoil is the downside to the idea; it just kicks more than it seems it should.
Moon

One of these days I'll pick one up. Its one of those guns I want, just because.
 

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the 9mm Centennial

Objectively A charged 9mm moon slaps right in, just like a .45. The loaded moons are great for administrative loading/unloading.

The brass remains fine for reloading.

On the downside, there is the mooning/demooning business; extra moons about 3-5 are necessary before a range session.

In the J-frame, recoil is surprisingly brisk, especially compared to a similar-weight auto.

My Centennial is not Carried to often, but when it is it’s in a ankle holster
Recoil is the downside to the idea; it just kicks more than it seems it should.
Moon you and think along the same lines on this one
 

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the 9mm Centennial

Objectively A charged 9mm moon slaps right in, just like a .45. The loaded moons are great for administrative loading/unloading.

The brass remains fine for reloading.

On the downside, there is the mooning/demooning business; extra moons about 3-5 are necessary before a range session.

In the J-frame, recoil is surprisingly brisk, especially compared to a similar-weight auto.

My Centennial is not Carried to often, but when it is it’s in a ankle holster
Recoil is the downside to the idea; it just kicks more than it seems it should.
Moon you and think along the same lines on this one

Have you had any issues with bent moonclips? Do you carry a reload when you carry the weapon? Have you had headspace issues where certain ammo works with the clips and some does not?


I used to shoot 625s, the 5" .45acp revolver and had kind of a love hate relationship with them. Yes, the speed to reload was excellent but messing with the clips sometimes a pain in the backside.
 

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Jimmo952 the moonclips do get bent real easy, yes i do carry a reload they are carried in a camera film container. Or a old cell phone case, on my weak side hip. Ive not had any headspace issues, every factory brand and my handloads have alway fired with every squeeze of the trigger.
 

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Jimmo952 the moonclips do get bent real easy, yes i do carry a reload they are carried in a camera film container. Or a old cell phone case, on my weak side hip. Ive not had any headspace issues, every factory brand and my handloads have alway fired with every squeeze of the trigger.
Thanks for the response. Its appreciated.

I should asked this earlier but didn't think of it. Do you experience sticky extraction when attempting to unload fired cases?

The 940 was known for that early on. I think Smith made an attempt to deal with that in the -1 version. Not sure how big of a deal it was or if the "fix" worked. .
 

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Discussion Starter #37
No extraction issues with my 940-dash-nothing. And my reloaded brass has generally had a hard life.
Moon
ETA- the bent moons are generally the product of demooning without a tool. I usually use the cylindrical one, but the stamped steel works too....the one made for .45s.
M
 

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Discussion Starter #40
Full disclosure; carried the .45 revos, but the moons were handled with care. Never had issues with bent ones, tho'.
For field use, AutoRims make a certain amount of sense. A different tool head is all it requires for reloading them on .45ACP dies.
Moon
 
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