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Discussion Starter #1
Always seemed a good idea; cheap ammo especially.

We took three to the range; my 940, a Taurus and a Ruger.
Consensus was that they were surprisingly rappy to shoot; it wasn't a chronograph night, but that will come next.
Getting hits wasn't hard at 21'.
Thoughts, experience?
Moon
 
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I have a Taurus 905 that I seem to be getting more and more fond of.
I don't find the recoil to be bad at all. I do wish I could get larger grips for it.
Even the slightly larger aftermarket Hogue's are Small for my large hands.
You probably have gotten used to all the 7.65 Browning you shoot Moon.
 
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Umm … rappy?

Uhh, yeah. More than a .38 Special in an otherwise identical gun; more like a junior varsity .357.
I'll confess not getting much pleasure from hard shooting guns anymore, but revos are a different deal. The same ammo in the P365, a small, light gun, is much more pleasant to shoot.
Let's not have a manhood contest here; I've the 11oz 340SC; with magnums, it is 'rappy' times 10! ;)
BTW, the humpback 940 can be held lower in the hand; it was more pleasant to shoot than the exposed hammer Taurus IMHO.
Moon
 

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I really didn't like the LCR in 9mm. The snap was just not nice at all. I have a Charter Arms in .45 ACP that's more comfortable. I suspect that the grip on the LCR is just too small for 9mm.


I have a Taurus in .380, which uses the same ammunition as Glock 42. That one is mostly okay, but I also replaced the grips on it.
 

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Uhh, yeah. More than a .38 Special in an otherwise identical gun; more like a junior varsity .357.
I'll confess not getting much pleasure from hard shooting guns anymore, but revos are a different deal. The same ammo in the P365, a small, light gun, is much more pleasant to shoot.
Let's not have a manhood contest here; I've the 11oz 340SC; with magnums, it is 'rappy' times 10! ;)
BTW, the humpback 940 can be held lower in the hand; it was more pleasant to shoot than the exposed hammer Taurus IMHO.
Moon
Thanks, Moon. I've not heard/read the term before and suspected you meant something akin to snappy or hard-hitting. I appreciate the clarification/confirmation.

Rappy:

something that is small and/or cute

When looking at the new puppy, she exclaimed, "Rappy!"
I know how to use Google, too. (And I did prior to asking.) See, I -also- know how to tell when a definition doesn't match the context of a sentence (which I felt it didn't, in this case), hence why I inquired.

If you take a peek above, it's pretty clear that said definition isn't what was meant. :)


Getting back on topic:
I personally dislike oddball calibers in traditional form factors. i.e. 9mm revolvers, 9mm or .357 SIG 1911's, etc. I have no good explanation for this prejudice, as it's certainly devoid of scientific foundation; it just bugs me -- which is why I don't own such bastardizations. :)
 

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surreal', as you might conclude from my nom-de-forum, I've always been fond of auto-caliber revolvers, particularly Smith 25s and 1917s. The 940 iteration of the Centennial has been out of production for no small time, and I had to track mine down on Gunbroker. The surprising, 'rappy', recoil likely had something to do with the idea's demise.
BTW, as regards the 'rappy' term, it's been used here to describe the .380 PPK; it's not just plain recoil, but a sting out of proportion to the cartridge. Three eighties in a G42 simply don't rap at all. Didn't realize the term could cause confusion.



As always, a bike glove will tame the snap of hard kicking, or even rappy, pistols far more easily than gihugo grips.
Moon
 
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Always seemed a good idea; cheap ammo especially.

We took three to the range; my 940, a Taurus and a Ruger.
Consensus was that they were surprisingly rappy to shoot; it wasn't a chronograph night, but that will come next.
Getting hits wasn't hard at 21'.
Thoughts, experience?
Moon
I never heard the term rappy either...
... But I like it!

I thought you had just misspelled Crappy.
Or even Snappy, which is a term I hear regularly with 380 PPKs.
 

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Another pretty much apples to apples comparo; have a 4" Chiappa 9, and a buddy has the 2.5" .357 of that gun. The 9s aren't even slightly rappy in that, tho' they noticeably push straight back. Again, the magnums have more recoil, .38s less, by comparison.
With the Chiappas, if you want to puzzle someone, let them figure out that the bottom chamber fires.
Doubt I'd pay new money on a Chiappa (shop owner gave me a great deal on mine), but a used .357 would be of interest.
Moon
 

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I am answering this thread from my perspective as a reloader and this makes the .38 S&W Special a favourite of mine. The only 9mm revolver that I own is a conversion cylinder for a Ratzeburg Korth Combat and extraction isn't stellar.

Like halfmoonclip I am also fond of the .45 ACP revolver with its moon clips and the advantage of the heavy lead bullet, that even with a light load, will work well on bowling pins but the 9mm does not offer me the same advantage over the .38 Special.
 

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"Rap" ... A quick, sharp knock or blow: a rap on the knuckles or a rap on the door.

"Rappy" ... a hybrid of adjective and adverb????
 
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I've had two Smith 625s over the years. Never had a 9mm revolver though I lusted over the Smith 940 for a years.

An LGS had the .356TSW version sitting new in the case and unloved for years. I should have snapped it up.

I have sort of a love-hate thing with revolvers chambered in semi-auto cartridges.

The fast reloads were nice. Sort of an integral speedloader. Bent clips were a pain as was going through the "mooning de-mooning cycles".
 

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According my information, the following 9mm revolvers use moon clips:

Chiappa Rhino
Taurus Model 905
Ruger LCR
Ruger SP101
AlphaProject 9261
FN Barracuda (ex Astra)

The following 9mm revolvers do not use clips:

Ruger Blackhawk
Korth Sky Marshal / Nighthawk Custom
Charter Arms Pitbull
S&W Model 547
Medusa M47

Not sure about the method of operation:

Manhurin MR73
 

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Discussion Starter #15
zaitcev, yes, there are some out there, tho' many aren't common. Much as I'd like to, never even touched a Korth. Unhappily, most don't interchange.


Jimmo, the mooning/demooning have to be carefully managed, and often call for the right tools. The Chiappa especially was a stinker to moon, and it's possible to bend even .45 ones, demooning without a tool.
Moon
 
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Getting back on topic:
I personally dislike oddball calibers in traditional form factors. i.e. 9mm revolvers, 9mm or .357 SIG 1911's, etc. I have no good explanation for this prejudice, as it's certainly devoid of scientific foundation; it just bugs me -- which is why I don't own such bastardizations. :)
That's funny because I love to find guns with non-traditional chamberings. Often they're a bust, but sometimes it's just brilliant. Like using moon clips in revolvers to shoot ACP rounds. Speedloaders, anyone? Hello!

I think putting the 9mm kurz in the PPK was one of those bastardizations, that turned out awesome. Even though it became the definition of rappy.
 

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That's funny because I love to find guns with non-traditional chamberings. Often they're a bust, but sometimes it's just brilliant. Like using moon clips in revolvers to shoot ACP rounds. Speedloaders, anyone? Hello!

I think putting the 9mm kurz in the PPK was one of those bastardizations, that turned out awesome. Even though it became the definition of rappy.
Well, I suppose that technically my S&W Governor is one of those bastardizations, so I am forced to correct my earlier remark -- because I do, in fact, own one such gun. Sorry about that; it slipped my mind when making the previous post. I only load .410 bore shells in it, as it's my up-close/personal snake gun for when out and about on the property; this is the purpose for which it was purchased. It's treated like the tool it is, too -- i.e. lives in a lockable tool box on the tractor, is never cleaned, etc. I knew that'd be its life, and the gun-guy in me chafes at this treatment … while the pragmatist in me knows they can't all look like my safe queens.

As for the PPK in 9mm being a bastardization -- I think that was more in line with logical progression/evolution.


So what's the practical purpose/application of a 9mm revolver??? I mean, my Governor takes .410 bore, and the practical benefit is being able to have a tiny scattergun with six shots between reloads. What's the comparable benefit to chambering a wheelgun in 9mm instead of .38 SPL? I ask because I avoid .357 MAG wheelguns like the plague since they make a whole lot more noise and recoil than .38 SPL wheelguns for a negligible stopping power improvement. (.357 MAG in a long gun, however, is awesome.)

I've always perceived 9mm wheelguns to be in a similar boat to .357 MAG wheelguns...
 

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Well, I suppose that technically my S&W Governor is one of those bastardizations, so I am forced to correct my earlier remark -- because I do, in fact, own one such gun. Sorry about that; it slipped my mind when making the previous post. I only load .410 bore shells in it, as it's my up-close/personal snake gun for when out and about on the property; this is the purpose for which it was purchased. It's treated like the tool it is, too -- i.e. lives in a lockable tool box on the tractor, is never cleaned, etc. I knew that'd be its life, and the gun-guy in me chafes at this treatment … while the pragmatist in me knows they can't all look like my safe queens.

As for the PPK in 9mm being a bastardization -- I think that was more in line with logical progression/evolution.


So what's the practical purpose/application of a 9mm revolver??? I mean, my Governor takes .410 bore, and the practical benefit is being able to have a tiny scattergun with six shots between reloads. What's the comparable benefit to chambering a wheelgun in 9mm instead of .38 SPL? I ask because I avoid .357 MAG wheelguns like the plague since they make a whole lot more noise and recoil than .38 SPL wheelguns for a negligible stopping power improvement. (.357 MAG in a long gun, however, is awesome.)

I've always perceived 9mm wheelguns to be in a similar boat to .357 MAG wheelguns...
Yes!!! The governor and Judge, and the Raging Hunter are all great examples of this. I didn't like the Judge when it first came out. I considered the .410 to be pretty useless for any purpose. But with the self defense loads that came out to serve that type of gun, the Judge is now bloody brilliant!!!

I don't own any 9mm revolvers, but I love revolvers, and I love the 9mm Lugar, so why not? The 9mm ammo is the cheapest centerfire ammo, and it has great ballistics and the largest selection of ammo choices. Plus, now I can reload for 9mm because my brass is not flying off in every direction. Perfect match, best of both worlds.

Used to be, 38 special was the most popular, cheapest, and easiest to find ammo around. Plus, it's easy to reload, and very versatile to reload. But the 9mm auto has pretty much killed it.

I think I just talked myself into making my next gun a 9mm revolver.
 

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What's the comparable benefit to chambering a wheelgun in 9mm instead of .38 SPL?
In less than 2" barrels, like the Ruger LCR or LCRx, the 9mm will make significantly more power than the .38 SPL, while still having manageable recoil. An average person should be able to train with their 9mm carry ammo out of such a gun.

Compared to the .357 version, where the recoil will be much greater, unpleasant to train with carry ammo, and power very close to the 9mm. Any longer barrel the .357 easily out powers the 9mm, but with small defensive guns with barrels under 2", 9mm seems to have benefits in both power and cost.
 

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Charter Arms Pitbull in 9mm does not use "clips." Interesting construction of cylinder allows use of rim-less 9mm. For being a revolver, it is OK and can shoot the 9mm that do not quite pass gauge after reloading. Try one if you have a chance to do so.
 
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