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Found photos from about five years ago at Facebook, WWII and Pre War section. Didn't know there was such a section. The owner was given this pistol by his Grandfather. Nice pistol. He was asking about it...got no replies. 1917
 

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Thanks RafMan. Somewhere I read...I think...that only 2,000 9mm-k PP's were manufactured during the war with the BMR. Don't ask me where I read it. I can't remember although it was yesterday. 1917
 

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The photos you found on the WW2 facebook site 1917 were mine and i was looking for any info but as you saw i got no responses. Thank you for re posting them in here to get more info and also messaging me to give me some info. I joined the forum and hope to learn more about this beautiful firearm. So much History behind this gun and it's truly priceless! I came into possession of this gun through my Dad, My grandpa was in the 13th Armored div. in WW2 and was a tank mechanic. They got into a small fire fight taking over an outpost in a german town and happened to take this PP sidearm off a high ranking German officer. There objective was actually to head to Hitler's home town and set up a defensive position at his home and do some intel. So long story short i have this beautiful gun and i also have the original Black leather holster with a (Otto Berlin stamp)
 

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That is great to hear aharlowrn. If there is more to your Grandpa's story I'm sure the guys here would like to hear it. Good to have you here. There is a lot to learn. I've been searching around for some old photos to see if I could stumble across something to aid Member Poloberst. He is looking for ejector/follower/mag changes for very early PP pistols in 9mm/k. 1929, 30, 31, 32, 33, etc. You have the right caliber and a pistol with a very good date. Welcome...while your Grandpa was on the ground my Dad was overhead in a B17 flying 35 missions as a bombardier. I thanked him plenty of times for his service.
 

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Mr Aharlowrn, welcome to the forum and congratulations on your historic family pistol.

I find it very interesting and beautiful, the wooden grip set with a brass inlay with a diamond shape.

It has always seemed sacrilege to me that such beautiful pistols, like the Walther PP and others, did not come from the factory with beautiful grips tailored to quality and beautiful design of the pistol.

Yes, I know that during the last period of the war, due to a lack of resources of plastic material that had to be used for other purposes, the last PP were made at the end of the conflict, with pressed wooden grips imitating the beautiful segregation like yours. You will surely agree with me, that while these late-war grips were made of wood, they had a rough finish and design that was not in keeping with the quality and design of a Walther PP. I don't mean this kind of "emergency grips"

The pistols in general and better still those of fine quality, as in this case, look much, much better with a set of quality walnut wood grip.

In addition, technically, they are the best, since they do not stick to the perspired clothing as it happens with the rubber and can be held very firmly, allowing to correct the taking of the weapon if necessary.
Not to mention the plus of beauty and quality that they add to the weapon.

Here is a photo of mine with French walnut grips, made in Belgium. for you to enjoy.
Luck !
91983
 

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Link on a current thread where a fellow is looking for a family pistol in the Mansfield, Ohio area. 1917
 

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91999


aharlowrn, when you look into the ejection port does your mag follower and ejector look like this one? I'm thinking this might have been the last 9mm/k design before the ribbed mag. Photo from a 152XXX PP with bottom mag release.
 

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The photos you found on the WW2 facebook site 1917 were mine and i was looking for any info but as you saw i got no responses. Thank you for re posting them in here to get more info and also messaging me to give me some info. I joined the forum and hope to learn more about this beautiful firearm. So much History behind this gun and it's truly priceless! I came into possession of this gun through my Dad, My grandpa was in the 13th Armored div. in WW2 and was a tank mechanic. They got into a small fire fight taking over an outpost in a german town and happened to take this PP sidearm off a high ranking German officer. There objective was actually to head to Hitler's home town and set up a defensive position at his home and do some intel. So long story short i have this beautiful gun and i also have the original Black leather holster with a (Otto Berlin stamp)
Welcome to this forum. Thanks to 1917, he brought your 9mmK PP to view and hopefully you can assist in our effort to determine the serial number with the introduction of the newer larger ejector/hold-open part that was introduced for 9mmK pistols. Your pistol was made earlier than the pre-war Persian contract that began at 116xxxP. I must disagree with earlier post on this thread as to the date of manufacture of your pistol. I believe the proofs on the right side of the slide are a crown over N, indicating the pistol was made before January 1940. In the case of your pistol, it was made at least a year or two before. More likely 1938.

Perhaps you can assist in our research by pulling the slide back on the empty magazine so that it is held open. Can you view the interior and tell us if the ejector/hold-open located to the left of the breech (facing the muzzle of the gun) looks like the ejector shown above in 1917's post. Also, is the follower in the magazine smooth on the top or does it have grooves milled along both edges of the follower? Thank you for your help.

The grips on your pistol are interesting. Of course different from the standard black Walther grips. Of course the presumption is they are original to the pistol as your Grandfather returned with it. Of course, the grips might have been made for him at some time in the past, if the originals were damaged, either in Europe or the US. You might check to see if the grip screw is threaded metrically or by US standards. If you have another Walther pistol or set of grips, does the screw from the wood grips turn in the Walther grip nut?

Anyway, your 9mmK is certainly as scarce pistol in beautiful condition. I hope that you might be able to help us. Thank you.
 
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So I got my Walther PP out and field striped it and cleaned it. Took some photos during the process so hopefully this will help you guys out. One thing i did notice was the slide locks back on last round fired but when you go to take Magazine out the slide slams forward. More photo's below because i could only load 10 photos per post.
 

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I still can't figure out that chart. So 152724 P in a 9mmK PP BMR would be '41, '42, '43 or so?
Whoops, I totally misread the serial number. Both charts say 1938.Jan's Chart is in this thread:


The charts are weird because the numbers "wrapped-around". The In the late 900,000s Walther added a "P" to the end. There were some
Walthers with 7 digits (the "millions" range). but then drop back to 100,000, all in 1938
 

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92028


This is the photo we are looking for....only you need to raise the camera higher so that we can see the tip of the ejector leg. The part that touches the follower when an empty mag is inserted. You do indeed appear to have a grooved follower. To get a good picture of the follower you don't have to disassemble the pistol again if you have reassembled it. Just lock the slide open, let some good light fall into the chamber area and get a sharp photo of the ejector as it reaches in toward an empty magazine. You can also slightly retract the mag 1/16" if that helps clarify what is going on. This area of engagement is what Poloberst is looking for on these Z-M pistols. I would also be interested in what locks your slide open.....the follower pressing the ejector up so that the rear leg causes the breech face to rest against it or is the slide caught on the rear of the follower? Holler if I need to clarify this further. 1917
 

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post continued with the rest of the photo's. Enjoy and let me know what these might tell you Thanks again!
Eureka! Thank you aharlowrn (thats a mouthful) for the detailed photos and description of the action of your prize. And a big thank you to 1917 for finding this older post I had not seen.

Your 9mmK #115781P features the first style ejector/holdopen AND the early magazine with follower with milled grooves on each side. So we have narrowed down the gap for the beginning of the use of the new style 9mmK ejector between 115781P and 118xxxP Persian. My thoughts are still that the change was with the introduction of the Persian contract at 116xxxP. And, the action you described of the slide being locked back on the empty magazine demonstrates the action that was described to me by the owner of a very early 9mmK owner who said the grooved follower rose high enough to stop the slide, as the slide closed when the magazine was removed.

The holster brought home with your PP is a standard 1941 German police production small caliber holster produced by Otto Sindel of Berlin. Looking at the stitching of the strap on your holster, I have a feeling it was either repaired or a new strap installed, to accommodate the extra length of the PP. Being a police accepted and issued holster and your pistol a non-conforming caliber for police issue, I would presume it was a private purchase an officer for his own use with the issued police holster. Or perhaps your Grandfather picked the holster up to carry the pistol. Whatever. Thank you again for your help in my research.
 

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I notice that while the ejector has changed to a more conventional left side profile, the left side of the frame still has the cutout for the ejector style Poloberst showed. Also, I don't get it. What is the problem here, what hasn't Walther figured out? I get that the grooves allow the follower to ride higher so that the rear edge can block the slide after the last shot and in effect function as a 1/2 way effective slide hold open. But why do this? Is there just not enough room with the larger dia. 9mm/k round to allow the ejector leg to reach in far enough to be pressed upward by the stock follower? Did the ejector/follower at post #11 work as in lifting the ejector? That is a 152XXX SN 9mm/k and I don't know what that date is...early '40s. Would it have had a grooved follower. Seems like the ejector leg is being engaged by the follower. What gives? 1917
 

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Photo 1631 clearly shows the follower does not engage the ejector leg. And, the ejector is in the down position so it certainly isn't going to hold the slide open. Hence the grooves allowing the taller sitting rear of the follower to catch the slide breech face and hold it open. Thanks aharlowrn...I think that is what we all wanted to see.
 
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