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Here are a few scans out of the 75 year anniversary book......check the map to see all the locations Walther used to have, which includes the "Bueromaschinen"
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Thanks for sharing these, Oliver. Very nice. Can you provide information as to the actual source of the scan?
Searcher,
the book was published for the 75th anniversary (1886-1961) of the Walther Companies to include all of the plants (Sportwaffen, Bueromaschinen and Feinmechanik.
The book was published by "Meissner Verlag" out of Munich.
Over the years I was lucky enough to have found two examples. One in German and the other one is like so many manuals of the 60's tri-lingual.
However what makes it even more special is the original shipping box that one of the books was sent in.
 

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Here is another one that I posted in other Forum section, but now they are all in one place
 

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there was two more publications that I am aware of... one is a 50 year anniversary book, which I have never seen one in person and for the 120 year anniversary Walther had a box set, which was a printed "book/magazine" which included the "Special operations" DVD
 

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One of the barrel straightening machines is on display at the Weapons Museum in Oberndorf... A good example of one of the highly skilled jobs associated with gunsmithing!

...

It is indeed a highly skilled job, and not everybody is suited to be trained for it. Elmer Keith, who was a supervisor and inspector at an arsenal during WWII, once wrote that he tried to train people to "see" crooked barrels and how to straighten them, but only a precious few had the intuitive knack.

Barrel inspectors rank after polishers and fitters as the most highly paid.

All of them, incidentally, are being phased out by, respectively, elimination of polishing, CNC machining, and hammer-forging of barrels.

In a way it's sad.

M

P.S. Craftsmanship should not become a lost art.
 
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