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I ordered a few spare mags on eBay for my .380 ppk/s. They came today, I loaded them, the mag seated in my pistol, they fed properly, and then As I was reloading them I noticed they are marked .32 ACP. They are Walther factory mags. Any ideas, thoughts, or comments about using them.
 

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I ordered a few spare mags on eBay for my .380 ppk/s. They came today, I loaded them, the mag seated in my pistol, they fed properly, and then As I was reloading them I noticed they are marked .32 ACP. They are Walther factory mags. Any ideas, thoughts, or comments about using them.
The mags might not allow the pistol to consistently lock back on the last round. That’s the only ‘issue’ that has presented itself in mine...

Some folks say that the mag lips are angled differently but I figure that should only be a problem if you were to try to use the .32 mags in both pistol calibers. The follower and the lips may be designed differently between the two calibers.
 

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You are very mistaken. 9mm Kurz is AKA the .380 ACP.

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I'm not even remotely familiar with .32, but I read something referring to it as Kurz today. I knew about the designation for .380. I have Makarovs in both .380 and 9x18.
 

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I’ve only heard of .32 acp being referred to as 7,65 mm (Browning Short) and .380 as 9 mmK (Short).
The term "Short" is only used in case of the .380 ACP, thus 9 mm Browning Short. The .32 ACP is simply called 7,65 mm Browning. The correct German designations are:
  • 7,65 mm Browning (also 7,65 x 17 mm Browning) for the .32 ACP
  • 9 mm kurz (also 9 mm kz, 9 mmK, or 9 x 17 mm Browning) for the .380 ACP
Americans tend to write "Kurz" (or even mistakenly "Kurtz") with an uppercase "K" but in German language it's usually "kurz" with a lowercase "k".
 

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The term "Short" is only used in case of the .380 ACP, thus 9 mm Browning Short. The .32 ACP is simply called 7,65 mm Browning. The correct German designations are:
  • 7,65 mm Browning (also 7,65 x 17 mm Browning) for the .32 ACP
  • 9 mm kurz (also 9 mm kz, 9 mmK, or 9 x 17 mm Browning) for the .380 ACP
Americans tend to write "Kurz" (or even mistakenly "Kurtz") with an uppercase "K" but in German language it's usually "kurz" with a lowercase "k".
That could be very well be true. I’ve only heard the 7,65mm referred to as a Browning Short one time in person and that was in Ramstein on a visit. Never heard anyone else refer to it that way. It is also referenced on Wiki as a Browning Short (as cited Barnes, Frank C. (2006) [1965]. Skinner, Stan (ed.) Cartridges of the World (11th ed.) however those are the only two times I have ever seen it referred to as such. I just call it a plain old .32.
 

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Any ideas, thoughts, or comments about using them.
I had never given a thought to this subject until your post so I felt I had to experiment.

Today I went to the range with my PPK .380 ACP and took an assortment of magazines along. The .32 ACP magazines inserted and removed exactly as the .380 and there were no misfeeds or failures to eject. Neither .32 magazine would lock the slide back after the last round was fired or even when the slide was operated manually.

My .380 magazines can't even be inserted into my .32 pistol although they can be loaded with them and seem to hold the rounds in securely.
 

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My .380 magazines can't even be inserted into my .32 pistol although they can be loaded with them and seem to hold the rounds in securely.
I think whether the .380 mags can slide into a .32 pistol depends on whether the .32 pistol can accept a ribbed magazine. I got lucky with my .32 as it accepts all of my .380 mags.... I figure that it might have something to do with it being a later production .32.
 

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I think whether the .380 mags can slide into a .32 pistol depends on whether the .32 pistol can accept a ribbed magazine. I got lucky with my .32 as it accepts all of my .380 mags.... I figure that it might have something to do with it being a later production .32.
Interesting. I was looking to buy a PP calibred for 9mm-short (380 ACP) and noticed that the magazines were marked .32. I queried this and was told that the late husband used the .32 mags in the 380. I didn't believe it and was turned off buying the gun. Now it seems from the experiences noted here that apart from the last round the .32 mag might work to some extent in the .380. Always something new to learn, but still I wouldn't want to rely on a gun with the wrong mag.
 

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Interesting. I was looking to buy a PP calibred for 9mm-short (380 ACP) and noticed that the magazines were marked .32. I queried this and was told that the late husband used the .32 mags in the 380. I didn't believe it and was turned off buying the gun. Now it seems from the experiences noted here that apart from the last round the .32 mag might work to some extent in the .380. Always something new to learn, but still I wouldn't want to rely on a gun with the wrong mag.
Yes, I agree... I wouldn’t choose to rely on .32 mags in a .380 pistol. I would only use them in a pinch if I had no other option because I like my pistols to work 100% as designed.

I did find that most of the time, my .32 mags did lock back the .380 pistols (and I tried 5 different .32 mags) but one or two of the mags didn’t lockback at all. I didn’t test the mags enough to determine whether a mag that worked initially might randomly fail or if it worked one time that it would work all the time. It’s interesting. The good news is that PP mags in .380 seem to be readily available for purchase.
 

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Yes, I agree... I wouldn’t choose to rely on .32 mags in a .380 pistol. I would only use them in a pinch if I had no other option because I like my pistols to work 100% as designed.

I did find that most of the time, my .32 mags did lock back the .380 pistols (and I tried 5 different .32 mags) but one or two of the mags didn’t lockback at all. I didn’t test the mags enough to determine whether a mag that worked initially might randomly fail or if it worked one time that it would work all the time. It’s interesting. The good news is that PP mags in .380 seem to be readily available for purchase.
How fortunate you are (for the time being) in the US where there's some synpathy for gun collectors. I'm in S Africa and the ANC wants to disarm citizens on the grounds that 'self defense is not sufficient grounds to own a gun'! I'm interested in classic guns like the Walher P38, PP and PPK, a Webley in .455 calibre etc, and want to collect these, but have to apply for a collector's accreditation which takes about a year, with luck. Permission can be refused with no reason given. If I buy a gun I can't try it or even handle it until I've applied for a license for that particular gun which has to stay in a safe at a dealer. So buying used guns is difficult. This is why I'm relying on others' experience, so the experiences shared here are all the more appreciated. I wouldn't chose a .380 for self defense if I had a choice of a larger calibre, but I have the idea that ammo design has improved so that this calibre has more stopping power than in the past. I'm wonder if the PP and PPK (and the the US PPKS) feed hollow points reliably. As I said, these guns are mainly objects of interest to me - just looking at them is satisfying - but it's reassuring to know that in a country with horrendous violent crime one has a gun with at least fair stopping power. I also wonder if the P38 handles hollow points. (Self defense guns are a Ruger 357 magnum and a Beretta 92 SB). I'm going to to sports shooting too in the very optimistic hope that when self defense guns are outlawed I'll at least be able to enjoy the collectors guns and sports shooting. Thanks again for the input.
 

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Welcome to the forum Esoterica. You have my sympathy for your difficulties. We've got a lot of knowledgeable members here so we'll help you out as best we can.

I've never tried shooting hollow points through my P38's or PPK's but it sounds like you're well equiped for the time being with the Beretta and Ruger.
 

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How fortunate you are (for the time being) in the US where there's some synpathy for gun collectors. I'm in S Africa and the ANC wants to disarm citizens on the grounds that 'self defense is not sufficient grounds to own a gun'! I'm interested in classic guns like the Walher P38, PP and PPK, a Webley in .455 calibre etc, and want to collect these, but have to apply for a collector's accreditation which takes about a year, with luck. Permission can be refused with no reason given. If I buy a gun I can't try it or even handle it until I've applied for a license for that particular gun which has to stay in a safe at a dealer. So buying used guns is difficult. This is why I'm relying on others' experience, so the experiences shared here are all the more appreciated. I wouldn't chose a .380 for self defense if I had a choice of a larger calibre, but I have the idea that ammo design has improved so that this calibre has more stopping power than in the past. I'm wonder if the PP and PPK (and the the US PPKS) feed hollow points reliably. As I said, these guns are mainly objects of interest to me - just looking at them is satisfying - but it's reassuring to know that in a country with horrendous violent crime one has a gun with at least fair stopping power. I also wonder if the P38 handles hollow points. (Self defense guns are a Ruger 357 magnum and a Beretta 92 SB). I'm going to to sports shooting too in the very optimistic hope that when self defense guns are outlawed I'll at least be able to enjoy the collectors guns and sports shooting. Thanks again for the input.
I’m sorry to hear about gun ownership in S. Africa... I was not aware that it is such a long and difficult process. I hope the situation improves there. As for hollowpoints, my Ranger PPK and German PPK/s guns all function perfectly with certain hollowpoints. They don’t like every hollowpoint but once I found the ones they like, they have all functioned flawlessly. Based on my experience, the German ones were the most picky about hollowpoint, my Ranger doesn’t have a problem with any ammo, and my friends who own the S&W and Ft. Smith versions report that their guns like any and all hollowpoints.

In the past several years, I’ve come to think that shot placement is more important than stopping power. I’ve seen too many people survive being shot with .45s and 9 mm... now I just focus on aiming to stop the threat (and making sure I have an extra mag on me at all times). The extra mag is a must for me if I’m carrying the .380 and not the .357 sig.
 

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That could be very well be true. I’ve only heard the 7,65mm referred to as a Browning Short one time in person and that was in Ramstein on a visit. Never heard anyone else refer to it that way. It is also referenced on Wiki as a Browning Short (as cited Barnes, Frank C. (2006) [1965]. Skinner, Stan (ed.) Cartridges of the World (11th ed.) however those are the only two times I have ever seen it referred to as such. I just call it a plain old .32.
CIP's official designation is 7,65 mm Browning but in Switzerland for example it's quite common to say 7,65 mm kurz instead. So I'm not surprised that also 7,65 mm Browning Short can be heard in other regions.
 

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CIP's official designation is 7,65 mm Browning but in Switzerland for example it's quite common to say 7,65 mm kurz instead. So I'm not surprised that also 7,65 mm Browning Short can be heard in other regions.
That makes sense. I’ve never heard it referred it as 7,65 mm Short, but it’s interesting how the same ammo can be known by multiple names throughout the world. Here in the US, most folks at my range wouldn’t even recognize the 7,65 mm designation. They would just say .32 ACP. As for the word ‘Kurz’, I’ve actually heard two Germans pronounce the word completely differently. That was a bit funny to me.
 
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