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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Finally got to my LGS and got my brand new PPK/S stainless.
The gun is beautiful, flawless, well fitted, and presents as a nice package.
Took it apart for a clean and lube prior to shooting but it looked like that had already been done.

Fired 70 rounds total (5 Sig JHP, 15 of 50 year old Remington, and 50 Sig FMJ.
Perfect performance with zero issues in function. Wasn’t shooting for high accuracy this time but it looks like it will be just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Oh. And bless whoever it was here that passed on the trick of using an old credit card to hold the trigger guard down during assembly and disassembly. That idea was worth its weight in gold.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You can also just push the trigger guard sideways so that it rests on the bottom of the frame.
Yes did that with he .22 version originally but didn’t think much of “cranking” the metal over in a unnatural position.
 

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Yes did that with he .22 version originally but didn’t think much of “cranking” the metal over in a unnatural position.
It's not intended to be "cranked". The hole and the pivot were designed and machined to allow the trigger guard, when opened, to be moved slightly sideways so the pistol can be field-stripped without the need for any supplementary item such as a coin or plastic wafer.

If the new ones won't do it, it's because the trigger guard and/or pivot were not made to the drawings, or because this feature was eliminated to reduce cost.

M
 

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I have 2 PPK pistols. On one moving the trigger guard does the trick, but on the other the trigger guard won't stay put and I now put a pencil/pen in the "hole" created behind the trigger to hold it open. Thanks for the credit card trick. I'll start trying it.

Glad to hear how much you like your new PPK/S. I'm holding out for the blued versions. However, I'm torn between the PPK and the PPK/S. Plenty of time to decide, I'm thinking.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It's not intended to be "cranked". The hole and the pivot were designed and machined to allow the trigger guard, when opened, to be moved slightly sideways so the pistol can be field-stripped without the need for any supplementary item such as a coin or plastic wafer.

If the new ones won't do it, it's because the trigger guard and/or pivot were not made to the drawings, or because this feature was eliminated to reduce cost.

M
Okay well I don’t like moving the mechanism “slightly sideways” for either the .380 or the .22. Hard to believe this movement is as designed, as the .22 didn’t think much of it and was reluctant to stay there, but I am not a PPK expert so I’ll take your word for it.
In any case I’ll stick with the plastic wafer as it works very well very simply.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I have 2 PPK pistols. On one moving the trigger guard does the trick, but on the other the trigger guard won't stay put and I now put a pencil/pen in the "hole" created behind the trigger to hold it open. Thanks for the credit card trick. I'll start trying it.

Glad to hear how much you like your new PPK/S. I'm holding out for the blued versions. However, I'm torn between the PPK and the PPK/S. Plenty of time to decide, I'm thinking.
I was waiting for the “blued” version also (that likely will be black) but when I got the PPK/S .22 in stainless (not sure why I got the stainless) I really liked the looks. I’ll probably get it in black/blue too when it finally comes out.
 

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I've seen many a used Walther with scratches in the frame and even really deep ones from the trigger guard being pushed aside from not taking care and just sliding the guard sideways to snap it into place. Very unsightly where the rest of the pistol is mint.
I always place plastic in the gap except for a quick disassembly for cleaning. Then, I just use my finger. I've found that the pen/pencil rolls off easily snapping the guard home.
The rod through the hole trick works fine, as well. Except when you remove/replace the trigger/spring/bar for deep cleaning or replacement if someone wants a serrated/or non trigger. Then, you need the guard open as far as possible for that 3-handed operation.
Some of you know exactly what I'm talking about.
I have no poker chips on hand. I always loose them all.
 

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Actually, I was more concerned about emptying the magazine thru' the gun if live rounds were to be used, tho' repeated slams on the safety drum isn't a good idea either.
As regards a credit card (I prefer a coin) holding the trigger guard...with the .380 recoil spring especially, having the trigger guard stay put is really handy.
Moon
 

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Any of you guys have any news on when the PPK 0.380 will be produced in the blued version? I have been unable to find any information about the ppks, the shops I used (e.g. Gander and Palmetto) just don't carry them anymore. I really like these pistols, I inherited my dad's 1938 PP, and bought a modern PPK/S in 0.22 back in 2015. I also bought a FEG clone of the PP which is a regular shooter.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Don’t know if a blued version has been confirmed as in the works.
I keep hearing it’ll just be the black (coated) pistol.
Wouldn’t bet on anything with the lack of specifics but I guess I would be surprised if they produced 3 models - stainless, black, and blued.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The pistol is already fairly pricey.
Producing a blued version, with its extra labor involved, would be be even more dollars.
 

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MG Mike: Would a traditional blue be more expensive to produce? Are there manufacturing implications that may have caused Smith to abandon traditional bluing?
 

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The quality of a blued finish is directly proportional to the preparatory polishing. In bygone days --and still today in custom shops-- accomplished polishers were the highest paid workers in a gun factory (along with experienced fitters).


M
 

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I mixed up the words, I meant the black version (although my PP and the FEG are blued). I will keep looking for news, eventually production will catch up with demand. Thanks for replying.
 
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