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(I think that I found the right spot for this now).

Hello there gentlemen. I'm new to your forum and have recently purchased a post war P38. I've been doing some reading about my shooter and have clarified its markings, but I'm hoping that someone might be able to provide some insight about it.
This pistol is stamped on the upper left trigger guard with the "68", the Ulm antler, and the Eagle Nitro. The serial number begins with 310XXX, it bears the circle with dot stamps on the slide, frame, etc, and shows the "Made in West Germany? On the right of the frame. The front site is the thin version marked "4", the slide is a thin version, and there is no hex bolt. There are no import markings.
There are no serial numbers on the slide nor barrel. There appears to be a "3" stamped on the underside of the barrel base. This pistol came with the wood grain box (number matching) to the pistol. There was a factory target included, but it was "period correct" not SN matching.
Can anybody tell me what I have here? I'll try to attach pics, but Im not real tech advanced.
Thank you all very much!!
 

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You appear to have a standard Ulm-proofed 1968 commercial P38. It was marked as made in WG for import, but since I see no identifier for the importer, it was likely imported new in 1968.

It has the circle-dot factory control mark usually reserved for service variants, but using parts so marked on civilian guns happened all the time.
 

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Thanks much for the info. There are no importer marks anywhere, so would it be safe to assume that it came in prior to regs?

Regarding the circle dot stamp.... does that mean that they just transferred the police/military parts from that side of the house to the commercial production side? Were there any differences in police/military stamped parts in terms of quality or tolerances, or was it simply an identifier? I can't find an explanation anywhere on-line that clarifies that.

The "WG" you refer to.... can you clear that up for me? Which stamp is that and what does WG mean? And is it a commercial piece because it lacks police/military markings?

Regarding the included target...... the sn: was only 40 +/- away from what this pistol is numbered as. Is there any chance that came from the factory like that? The numbers are so close it seems virtually impossible they could have found it on-line, bought it, and added it to the set.

I keep reading how fragile the frames are. Is this as accurate as it's made out to be? There is obvious wear in the aluminum, but I don't consider it to be "damaged". Should I stay away from shooting it and just keep it as a collectible? Any input on value in today's market? And also....anything seem hinkey? It looks original, but I'm certainly not an authority.

Thanks a million!
 

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I answered much like Absalom did in your original new members post. WG = West Germany Shoot it and be happy, it will last longer than you do unless you pump thousands of round down the pipe.
 

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Absent other importer marks, it would have to have been imported by Walther as a standard commercial import.

I don’t know how the production at the factory was physically organized, but I doubt there were actual different “sides to the house”; parts for military/police batches just got some additional inspections and marks.

And as GeoNole said, the WG was just my abbreviation of the Made in West Germany; country-of-origin marks were always required, not in Germany but for importation to the US, long before the GCA of 1968.

Military and police versions of that vintage would have additional acceptance stamps, manufacture month/year on the slide, and military pistols a BW on the frame.

As for the close-by-serial target, I would consider it most likely that the pistols traveled in a larger batch and at some point, maybe when they got the country stamp that’s not factory, they were out of the boxes and someone was careless when re-packing them. Just a guess.
 

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As I relayed elsewhere, those single-line roll marks are relatively uncommon. All that I have seen have been from 1968, but it is a small sample size countable on one hand.
 

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I keep reading how fragile the frames are. Is this as accurate as it's made out to be? There is obvious wear in the aluminum, but I don't consider it to be "damaged". Should I stay away from shooting it and just keep it as a collectible?
I wouldn't worry about shooting it. Having the time and money to wear out a P38 sounds like a worthwhile endeavor.
 
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