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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys! My grandpa was a S/Sgt in the 509th PIB from 1941-1945. He brought this back with him, and I have recently inherited it. From a quick look at the serial numbers, it appears to have been made in 1942. I don’t see any markings on the holster or the magazines. I know next to nothing about the rest of it and was hoping you guys could help fill in the gaps! Thank you all in advance :)
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My dad was a British Infantry sergeant who “liberated” a Walther a short time after D-Day. He was badly wounded in the Ardennes forest but survived and was shipped back to Britain to undergo a series of surgeries. On the boat a young officer told him that he couldn’t keep the little pistol and had to hand it over to him. My dad said that in a clumsy moment he “accidentally“ dropped the gun over the side of the ship and into the sea.

It‘s a shame he lost it as I would love to have inherited a pistol like the OP’s.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
My dad was a British Infantry sergeant who “liberated” a Walther a short time after D-Day. He was badly wounded in the Ardennes forest but survived and was shipped back to Britain to undergo a series of surgeries. On the boat a young officer told him that he couldn’t keep the little pistol and had to hand it over to him. My dad said that in a clumsy moment he “accidentally“ dropped the gun over the side of the ship and into the sea.

It‘s a shame he lost it as I would love to have inherited a pistol like the OP’s.
Wow, that's crazy. Sounds like the officer could have been trying to "liberate" it for himself, haha. At least he made it home, that's all that really matters in the end. Thanks for that story!!
 

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You've answered most questions yourself ;) . Probably made in 1942, eagle/N proofmark, rough wartime finish. WaA 359 = Waffenamt => the gun was owned by a German officer, not a 'normal' soldier (they got P08 or P38).

Take good care for the holster as well!
 

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Nice catch, OP. Selling it won't put anyone thru' college, so, please, hang on to it. :)
It looks a nice example.
The rear sight has me intrigued; we have been discussing such on another thread.
Moon
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Nice catch, OP. Selling it won't put anyone thru' college, so, please, hang on to it. :)
It looks a nice example.
The rear sight has me intrigued; we have been discussing such on another thread.
Moon
Thank you. I would never consider selling it! I never got to meet my grandfather, and now I finally have something tangible that makes me feel close to him. Now I’m intrigued as well, would you care to elaborate on the rear sight?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
You've answered most questions yourself ;) . Probably made in 1942, eagle/N proofmark, rough wartime finish. WaA 359 = Waffenamt => the gun was owned by a German officer, not a 'normal' soldier (they got P08 or P38).

Take good care for the holster as well!
Thank you for that information. It would be nice to have some capture papers for it or something, but I have the gun and the story and that’s enough for me. Apparently, he also had two Lugers with him on the ride back home, but they were stolen from his lap while he was sleeping. Oh well!
 

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Hey guys! My grandpa was a S/Sgt in the 509th PIB from 1941-1945. He brought this back with him, and I have recently inherited it. From a quick look at the serial numbers, it appears to have been made in 1942. I don’t see any markings on the holster or the magazines. I know next to nothing about the rest of it and was hoping you guys could help fill in the gaps! Thank you all in advance :) View attachment 107381
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Hey guys! My grandpa was a S/Sgt in the 509th PIB from 1941-1945. He brought this back with him, and I have recently inherited it. From a quick look at the serial numbers, it appears to have been made in 1942. I don’t see any markings on the holster or the magazines. I know next to nothing about the rest of it and was hoping you guys could help fill in the gaps! Thank you all in advance :) View attachment 107381
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This pistol was issued to the German military. This is determined because both slide and frame have the Waffenamt acceptance stamps. Each maker had a number or numbers assigned to them. Walther, this pistol's maker, had the number '359' assigned to them. The stamp 'WaA359' is the military acceptance stamp for Walther, WaA being the abbreviation for the German words 'Waffen' meaning weapons and 'Amt' for the word office. The 'Waffenamt' was the weapons office which approved weapons and weapons related items for use by the Wehrmacht or German military. The condition of your Walther PP pistol is only fair due to the extensive finish wear on the pistol. The holster is in poor condition for the same reason. Not meant as an insult, just my evaluation based on your photos. Hang onto them as family relics and heirlooms. Hope this proved helpful.
 
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