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Discussion Starter #1
Question:
I was curious if my 2000 .40 P99 was 100% Germany manufactured and NOT S&W, so I went to Walther P99 FAQ page, and verified that it had all the marks, i.e., Eagle over the N, but inscribed on the ejection port it says, ".40 S&W"

So now I'm curious..


Greg
 

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40 S&W is the type of round it uses. I have a Saig Sauer with two barrels one .40 S&W, the other .357 Sig. It helps to make the difference between a number of rounds in the same caliber but still different. eg .357 Magnum and .357 Sig. 9mm Luger is 9x19 where 9x21 may have a different name.

Your P99 should be 100% German too.
 

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The S&W part of ".40 S&W" only refers to the caliber that the weapon is chambered for. Because S&W was the first major manufacturer to produce the .40, the name ".40 S&W" kinda stuck. It is essentially a "lite" 10mm round that was downpowered for controlability. (Guys, please correct me if I am wrong. I think this goes back to early CHP tests with the S&W 4006?)Most of the new ammo I have found is listed as ".40 Auto"
My 1999 P-99, #4044xx, sounds identical to yours. Hope you like it!
 

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The FBI was using a lower powered 10mm as their standard. The .40 S&W was introduced that provided a 10mm bullet at lower power.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanx for all the replies...I'm not longer confused, just dazed


Also, I had read somewhere about the 'downsized' 10mm, but now that you metioned it again, it seems to make sense.

Greg
 
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