Sad WWII PP - Page 4 - WaltherForums
WaltherForums
 

Go Back   WaltherForums > Walther Firearms > PP and TP Series

Like Tree15Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-09-2016, 08:25 PM   #31
Supporting Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Backwoods Virginia
Posts: 13,887
MGMike .38
Skip: If either of those two guns has been refinished, Earl could could learn a thing or two from studying them.

M
pilkguns likes this.
MGMike is offline   Reply With Quote
Register
Old 02-09-2016, 08:46 PM   #32
Senior Member
 
pilkguns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Somewhere between Ulm & Tennessee
Posts: 592
pilkguns .22
Quote:
Originally Posted by MGMike View Post
Skip: If either of those two guns has been refinished, Earl could could learn a thing or two from studying them.

M
yep, neither of them look like they have been altered. If they had anything done to them it must been a wire wheel. and blued back with rust or maybe even cold blue.
__________________
if you know how many guns you have, you don't have enough guns. Heck, if you know how many TPHS, or PPKs you have, you don't have enough of those either.


A gun and a parachute have a common dynamic, if you need one, nothing else will really suffice.
http://learntoengrave.com
pilkguns is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2016, 09:26 PM   #33
Supporting Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Backwoods Virginia
Posts: 13,887
MGMike .38
Quote:
Originally Posted by chaosrob View Post
... Had I of knows this would be the final product I would have simply went for a refinish and it would have cost ~ 1/3 of the final price. In the end it is still a nice shooter, expensive shooter but nice
This is one of the reasons why I suggest simply bead or vapor blasting and rebluing. If all one wants is to get rid of ugly bare metal and cover it with blue, the potential for irreparable damage is minimized. If one wants later to perform a proper restoration, it can still be done. But once someone has pushed it into a wheel charged with 180 grit, that option is gone forever.

The harsh fact is that if you want a nice job done, it must be done by hand, which simply is not economic for professional refinishers except for customers willing to pay for it. Such work is not cheap. Most people recoil from it. And unless the gun is really a valuable piece, it's not worth it. So you have to do the polishing yourself. This requires practice and patience. Find a friendly gunsmith who will give you scrap slides and other parts to practice on. Do not proceed with something you value until you can obtain a satisfactory result on something you don't.

One soon recognizes that compromises are necessary: rust pitting vs. markings. One or the other often has to be sacrificed. Preserving flat surfaces usually means sacrificing the markings; preserving markings usually results in rounded corners and flats that are no longer flat.

One also has to learn to polish in the same direction as original; otherwise it won't look right. And one must learn where not to polish; indiscriminate, wholesale polishing of the slide flats will produce unsightly flats on the gripping serrations as well. This calls for delicate positioning by hand on a stationary abrasive.

Find some pieces of perfectly flat milled or smooth ground steel and glue 320 paper on them with spray adhesive. Use these as wet-or-dry sanding sticks. If one uses them adroitly, it is possible to save proof marks by going closely around them rather than over them. A tiny drop of varnish over them (later removed with acetone) can give partial protection against the inevitable slips.

M

Edit: P.S. : Change abrasive paper often. Once it gets loaded, it smears rather than cuts; if one wants a crisp finish, it must be cut, not smeared.
searcher451 likes this.

Last edited by MGMike; 02-10-2016 at 07:03 AM.
MGMike is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Old 02-10-2016, 08:24 AM   #34
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Northern Illinois
Posts: 247
skip_c .22
Correction

Gentlemen,
Please excuse my post as it appears I was unclear about my two RFV's.
Neither one has been refinished and are original as I received them.
The only refinished PP I have is an "RJ". I hope this clears things up and
again, I'm sorry for the confusion.
Skip
skip_c is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2016, 12:06 PM   #35
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: SW US
Posts: 117
tcallre .22
I'm sorry your disappointed and I bet you paid a good price for the work done. But the thing sure looks nice to me.
tcallre is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2016, 02:19 PM   #36
Senior Member
 
pilkguns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Somewhere between Ulm & Tennessee
Posts: 592
pilkguns .22
That's a good write up by Mike on the toils of drawfiling a gun to a clean finish. Just to add a couple of things since I could see this being a sticky on the pitfalls of refinishing.

If you've got a good flat back and front on the gun or slide, AND have access to a surface grinder, you can save some time that way. If you have a knifemaking buddy with a belt surface grinder, that's the cat's meow !

I've never tried to work around the slide serrations. Just go all the way across the flats and the deepen the serrations with a triangular file. Lot of work, but that's all there is, short of setting the whole thing up in mill, and doing them one at a time.

I've ruined a lot of blue jeans dragging a file across my thighs trying to clean out the teeth (or the abrasives).
__________________
if you know how many guns you have, you don't have enough guns. Heck, if you know how many TPHS, or PPKs you have, you don't have enough of those either.


A gun and a parachute have a common dynamic, if you need one, nothing else will really suffice.
http://learntoengrave.com
pilkguns is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2016, 03:09 PM   #37
Senior Member
 
Herr Walther's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Virtual Emmingen, BW
Posts: 2,969
Herr Walther Unproven
This is my Walther Model 7 that I hand refinished with Brownell's Belgian Blue. This is about as close to a traditional finish for this era of pistol as you can get.

This was hand sanded with emory cloth up to 600 grit and then the Belgian Bueing process started. This is a long, time consuming process with boiling water, immersion, carding, and repeat 20 or 30 times until you are satisfied
that the blueing is deep enough.



pilkguns likes this.
__________________
Made in the U.S. of parts from Emmingen, Baden-WŁrttemberg.

Die Familie Rentz seit 1535 https://www.waltherforums.com/forum/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=2091&dateline=1394562  861
Herr Walther is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Lower Navigation
Go Back   WaltherForums > Walther Firearms > PP and TP Series

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On





Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.