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Old 07-28-2009, 07:33 PM   #1
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Cleaning tips, and rust prevention ideas and suggestions

This topic comes up from time to time, and lots of folks have weighed in over the years with suggestions ranging from Hoppe's No. 9 to Breakfree to, well, you name it, including Mobile 1 for your car (the synthetic version).

Here's a good article from The Gun Zone from a few years back that might prove informative for folks who are wondering about the best way to protect that new Walther:

http://www.thegunzone.com/rust.html

If you have any other thoughts or suggestions, list them here and we'll make this a Sticky.
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Old 07-28-2009, 10:41 PM   #2
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From what I have learned over the years in high school and college science classes put together with my knowledge of guns is that the majority of rust that you'd find on your handguns is after they have been sitting in the safe for a few days. This happens usually during the winter when bringing a cold gun into a warm environment and the water condenses on the gun, causing rust to form. During the summer when it's humid and muggy the moisture in the air will condense on the gun, also causing rust to form.

I've found that keeping desiccant moisture absorption packets in the safe provides a good way of removing the moisture from the guns and air, leaving a dry environment. I keep two of the following packets in there,

http://www.silicagelpackets.com/sili...ket-tyvek.html
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Old 07-29-2009, 02:33 PM   #3
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this sticky is an excellent idea searcher.

i agree marcus,desiccant is a must in my book for storing ammo along with a good ammo box that has a rubber seal.i use them also in my safe.

here's a good why to make your own desiccant while saving money in the long run.

you can go any where they sell construction material,like lowes or home depot and you can even rummage around construction sites.
get yourself some construction sheetrock boards.sheetrock is gypsum and hydroscopic.ask the sells person to make sure but it is actually very common.

you can break it up into what ever sizes you want.i usually break them into 3"-4"x2"-3" and use several per ammo box and small stacks in the safe.. cook it in an oven at 200 degrees for a few hours(this part is a must to be effective)before using. after about six months take them out and cook them again and re-use. of course,if you keep on opening your ammo box or safe alot,that doesn't help.you should have different grades of storage for your ammo,some more permanent and some more accessable and keep track.

viola, desiccants that are very effective.
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Old 07-29-2009, 02:54 PM   #4
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This is good information, priler. Thanks for sharing it.

I know that others have offered opinions when we've had similar threads in the past, so I'm hopeful that they will again chime in here with suggestions, tips, information, or products that have worked well -- or didn't, as the case may be. The more information we have, the better prepared we all will be in keeping our guns in as-close-to-perfect condition as we can manage.
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Old 12-02-2009, 08:08 PM   #5
 
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Rust and guns and prevention ideas and suggestions

Hi,
Anyone out there have ANY opinions on or experience with the following:Eastwood rust prevention productsPOR-15Chassis SaverRust BulletThanks
Bruce
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Old 12-11-2009, 09:31 PM   #6
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I use one of those tube-shaped heaters in my gun safe. Keeps all my stuff warm and dry.



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Old 04-22-2010, 10:19 AM   #7
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This material was originally posted in 2005 by Sniper 350. It's a good primer for folks new to handguns who are looking for cleaning tips:

Cleaning your Semi-Auto Pistol

First, the list of cleaning supplies you should own to clean your beloved firearm.

1. Nitro Solvent ( I use Hoppe’s 9 but any good grade will do)
2. Cleaning Patches- don’t skimp here, buy a good grade that doesn’t shred around the edges while your trying to use them.
3. Bore brushes—buy a good bronze brush ,along with a Nylon brush in the cal. You need
4. Patch cleaning utility tool- it is used to swab the bore with your patches, there are several different kinds—pick the one you like
5. Most important- A “firm” rated Toothbrush. Yeah, I know they make bronze and nylon brushes for that, but I like the toothbrush and I feel it works better—more on that later.
6. High grade Lubricant—don’t skimp here, buy the best you can find, I use “Break-Free” for rapid fire auto pistols. Holds up well under high heat.
7. “Gunslick” graphite lubricant for the rail system.
8. Gun cleaning Mat or you can use a large piece of that foam padding used to line cabinets in the kitchen or used to hold wood projects from moving while sanding on a flat workbench.
9. Bore Cleaning rod—I buy only Aluminum or Polymer ( plastic) Rods. It must be made of softer material than what your barrels are made of.
10. Last, some good lint-free rags

Your work area must be well-lit

Small problems can be caught during cleaning if you can see them, so pick a spot with LOTS of light.

Lay out your cleaning Mat---this is where you will place “all” of your parts---so make sure you have adequate room. I was always taught that when you take apart any weapon—place the first piece you remove on the left side of your Mat. The second piece you remove goes to the right of this and so on and so fourth. In this way you will establish the ORDER in which these parts should be assembled. Just start at the right side of your Mat and work in reverse order --- back to the left. In this way you won’t forget which part goes back on the weapon in the proper order. Get in the habit of doing this no matter how simple the disassembly is.


Make sure your gun is unloaded before cleaning: Check it twice

Remove your EMPTY Magazine from the weapon—place it to the far left.
Cleaning the magazine is not necessary but every 1,000rds or so, depending on how dirty the ammo is you are using, but I will cover it here.

Using the appropriate tool, depress the small plunger inside the hole in the bottom of the floor plate. Next carefully slide the floor plate off the magazine body, holding pressure on the magazine spring as soon as it becomes visible. Failure to control the magazine spring will result in it flying across the room. Release the tension on the spring and allow it to come out of the magazine body. Take NOTE of the shape and direction the spring comes out of the body. It is extremely important the spring is returned in the same manner and direction. The plastic follower should come out with the spring, but if it does not simple turn the body over and allow gravity to force it out. You now have 4 pieces. Line them up-- Floor plate, first; Spring; Follower and Magazine Body –they will be reassembled in reverse order.

Wipe the inside of the Magazine body and clean the follower. Also wipe off the spring. DO NOT pull on the spring to adjust tension-ever! If tension becomes an issue –REPLACE the spring. IF the magazine malfunctions, the gun is worthless.

DO NOT use a lot of oil inside the magazine---you don’t want crude collecting on the spring and follower.

Next, remove the slide from the weapon

Remove the recoil spring and barrel. Lay the recoil spring down next in line, followed by the barrel and then the slide. Place the guns frame at the end of the line.

Now go back and using your lint free rags, dampened with some nitro solvent, wipe off each part.

After wiping off all the magazine parts, place a very light coat of oil on everything. That's very light: remember that we don’t want too much oil to attract grit. You can assemble the magazine now or wait until after everything is cleaned. I must emphasize the importance of putting the spring back correctly.

Next, the barrel:

Using the Nylon bore brush push the brush through the barrel( from the breach side) and out the front end. This will remove some of the large particles that you don’t want to smash into the barrels walls with the bronze brush. Next soak this nylon brush in the nitro solvent and again run it through the barrel as before. Do not change directions with this brush inside the barrel, always push it all the way out the front. Let the barrel soak for a few minutes, while we attack the slide.

Using the toothbrush (dry) brush all the areas of the slide. Make sure to get inside the rail system . Next using a rag soaked in nitro solvent wipe all areas on the slide. Next you can soak the toothbrush in solvent and use it to clean the rails thoroughly . Holding the slide with the firing pin facing down, scrub the face of the firing pin area.

Pay close attention to any build up that will occur “under” the extractor. The extractor is the hooked shaped claw on the side of the slide. Examine it for damage each time you clean your weapon. If needed—you may need a bronze brush to remove this build-up. I always hold the slide with firing pin facing down---so liquid and debris doesn’t flow into the firing pin hole.
After 5,000 rds or so you can remove the firing pin for cleaning an inspection, but I won’t cover that here. Dry the entire slide off. Then using you fingers , apply a coat of oil inside the slide walls ( three sides). Next take your “Gunslick” and apply a fine bead of graphite lubricant on the inside of both Rail channels—from front to back. Put the Slide down,………….and go back to the barrel.

Even after letting the barrel soak in the solvent for a few minutes—it will take over 24 hours for all the residue to work itself from the barrel surfaces. If I am shooting my gun more than once a month, I don’t worry about this residual residue. If you are going to store the gun for longer than a month, then I would go back a day later and re clean the barrel. Now using the bronze brush soaked in solvent –push it through the barrel several times. The dirtier your ammo, the more time it will take to get the barrel clean. You can hold the barrel with a piece of “white” paper at the breach…… and look down the barrel for any uneven look to the barrel walls ( I am not talking ,of course, about the lands and grooves) Any dull spots mean dirt, so keep cleaning. The white paper will help reflect light up into the barrel making it easier for you to see. After some brush cleaning , run a patch down the barrel to clear out the debris. Go back and fourth with the above procedures, until the patches come out relatively clean. When you think the barrel is clean, run a lightly Oiled patch down the barrel a few times to coat the surfaces. At this point you can reverse the direction of the patch inside the barrel and really scrub the walls down with the gun oil.

Now coat the outside of the barrel with some gun oil and re install it inside the slide with the recoil spring. Turning your attention to the frame. Using the now wet toothbrush----you can brush off all the small exposed springs in the trigger mechanism . This is where the toothbrush shines---it can clean the tiny springs without pulling on them. Clean all areas on the frame that shows signs of powder residue. The frame, because it is Polymer doesn’t require much work. After the frame is cleaned………take your “Gunslick” and place a small amount of the graphite lube on each of the four rails Guides.
Now you are ready to install the slide back on the weapon. After this is done, work the action manually to work the “Gunslick” into the rail channels. It will be necessary to remove some excess Gunslick that will protrude from the back of the gun. Wipe this off and generally wipe down the whole gun.

You are done for basic cleaning at this point.

At certain intervals you may need to use a “copper” solvent inside your barrel. I like to use gunslick on the rails system, because nothing is more dangerous than allowing the semi-auto to become dry. The gunslick will continue to lubricate after extended periods because the graphite will work in a dry state, if necessary.

I hope I have covered the basics………others can jump in and add where I may have left out a step.

JF.
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Old 04-22-2010, 04:21 PM   #8
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The best thing that I have ever found is to place moth balls in my safe or storage cabinet to remove the oxygen from that erea. I have been using this method in my tool box for many years with great success. As they evaporate they replace the oxygen with an inert gas protecting the metal.
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Old 04-22-2010, 04:49 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by pntool View Post
The best thing that I have ever found is to place moth balls in my safe or storage cabinet to remove the oxygen from that erea. I have been using this method in my tool box for many years with great success. As they evaporate they replace the oxygen with an inert gas protecting the metal.
I've never heard that. Moth balls either emit napthalene or paradichlorobenzene. I'm not familiar with the phenomenon where they replace oxygen.

Mind you, I'm not saying that it doesn't occur. I'm just not familiar with it.

For the record, I retired after twenty seven years in the pest control industry.

Learn something new all the time.
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Old 04-22-2010, 06:53 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pntool View Post
The best thing that I have ever found is to place moth balls in my safe or storage cabinet to remove the oxygen from that erea. I have been using this method in my tool box for many years with great success. As they evaporate they replace the oxygen with an inert gas protecting the metal.
I would question this method for rust protection. First off the vapors given off by moth balls are quite toxic:

http://www.essortment.com/all/mothballhazard_ryft.htm

Mothballs have been around for years. They were what every mother used to keep the moths out of winter and summer clothes. The mothballs would be placed in a trunk to also keep the clothes deodorized. People used mothballs under their sofa cushions and in drawers and closets and under rugs. They were placed everywhere. Mothballs were the most inexpensive deodorizer to buy, so they were purchased in large quantities and used most frequently.

Now we find out that mothballs contain naphthalene, which is a poison if inhaled. Mothballs can cause nausea, vomiting and headache. Other signs of illness are shortness of breath, coughing and burning eyes.

Most people use them today without realizing their side effects
. Children that have glucose problems can become severely ill. Having clothing just removed from a storage trunk and put on can cause the naphthalene to enter through the skin
. Children that play in the home and reach under the sofa can ingest one by placing a mothball in their mouth
. Caution must be taken to rid the home of every mothball there is. Sometimes this isn't easy since there are flakes that are usually scattered and come in tiny slivers. They have to be vacuumed or swept up; try to contain the fumes in the process. After removing all the mothballs and flakes, empty the vacuum cleaner bag and discard it immediately outdoors.

If mothballs are placed under carpet and rugs in your home, remove the mothballs or flakes and have the carpets cleaned. This will remove any traces of naphthalene from your carpet. Then air out the house by opening the windows.

Make sure that all flakes are removed and that there are not any hiding for which you forgot to remove.
-----------------------
Now in a gun vault or gun chest there probably isn't a lot of worry about kids eating them. But the vapors ARE there.

Rust on firearms is caused bya combination of salts used in the ignition of the propellant, moisture in the air, and it's reaction on bare metal. If you fire black powder guns or use corrosive ammo, then you REALLY have to be concerned about corrosion on the bore. Most people use a mix of water and Ballistol to prevent corrosion from corrosive ammo. Actualy, just plain hot water down the bore will get rid of the corrosive salts. Then follow up with Ballistol.

On the outside of a gun, a light coating of a high quality gun oil will prevent any surface rust. In my gun safe I use a device called "Goldenrod" that is an electric heater that gives off radiant heat and keeps the air dry inside the gun safe. Uses just pennies worth of electricity a month and no worry about toxic vapors in my room. Cost about $15 and well worth the money. Just my 2cents.



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