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Old 09-11-2019, 08:38 AM   #11
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As I mentioned in post #9 I looked for US Military spec for lubricating the M4/M16 rile family. The spec has recently changed. It was to use CLP but it now is specifying dry lubricant. It being MilSpec no brand names are given. I have been using cap on my pistols for years, I have used Remington Drilube when I know I would be in very cold weather outdoors to avoid thickening of the oil. It is good stuff. I am going to research using dry lubricant only.
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Old 09-11-2019, 10:00 AM   #12
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I use a light synthetic grease on frame rails and sliding areas - but just a very thin coating.

In my experience with M1s and M14s grease is always used for lubrication. Oil is used for corrosion protection.
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Old 09-11-2019, 11:03 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jkv45 View Post
I use a light synthetic grease on frame rails and sliding areas - but just a very thin coating.

In my experience with M1s and M14s grease is always used for lubrication. Oil is used for corrosion protection.

Interesting to read. Does that experience go back to the period before 1961 for the M1 or 1965 for the M14?

From 59 to 61 I never greased an M1 and from 62 to 65 I never greased an M14. we lubed them and the M16 with oil. Maybe the Corps had a different protocol than the Army. That was not uncommon back in the day when I was in service.
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Old 09-11-2019, 11:28 AM   #14
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I served in the Army for 21+ years. What I mostly remember about weapons maintenance in the infantry was that we did it all the time. Kind of a default activity. It didn't matter what time of day that we returned from the range or the field, weapons were cleaned before anyone went home or to bed. We had a bore cleaner and oil. In the field you might be covered from head to toe in dirt, but your weapon better be clean. In the field, when not moving, many could be seen using toothbrushes on their weapons. Again, bore cleaner and oil. That's what I remember.
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Old 09-11-2019, 11:44 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by 1942bull View Post
Interesting to read. Does that experience go back to the period before 1961 for the M1 or 1965 for the M14?

From 59 to 61 I never greased an M1 and from 62 to 65 I never greased an M14. we lubed them and the M16 with oil. Maybe the Corps had a different protocol than the Army. That was not uncommon back in the day when I was in service.
No, this is based on current M14 maintenance, mostly for competition, as instructed by a former USMC Armorer.

The current M1 maintenance and lubrication recommendation is similar.

Tonyben is very well known and well respected in the M14 community.


The CMP's take on M1 lubrication -

http://www.civilianmarksmanship.com/...mblefeed2.html

That is more grease than I use though. They do say it's a bit more for photo clarity.
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Last edited by jkv45; 09-11-2019 at 11:53 AM.
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Old 09-11-2019, 05:00 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jkv45 View Post
No, this is based on current M14 maintenance, mostly for competition, as instructed by a former USMC Armorer.

The current M1 maintenance and lubrication recommendation is similar.

Tonyben is very well known and well respected in the M14 community.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eSX2koEAYvQ

The CMP's take on M1 lubrication -

Reassembly Of the M1 Garand Rifle

That is more grease than I use though. They do say it's a bit more for photo clarity.

Very informative. The greasing recommendation is not military. I do not mean to denigrate the recommendation by that comment. I respect the trainers of today like I respected my trainers.

in a post above the poster stated an M1 manual from 1965 specified grease on an M1. I found that strange because the M1 was officially replaced by the M14 in 1959. I could not imagine the Military printing a manual in for it six years later.

As I pointed out previously the Military is replacing CLP (oil) with Dry lube for the M16 and it variants. No grease, but you can find civilian rifle trainers saying to
use grease. I stick with MilDpecs

I till see no reason to grease a pistol. I use CLP and will not study using dry lube.
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Old 09-11-2019, 05:32 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by 1942bull View Post
Very informative. The greasing recommendation is not military. I do not mean to denigrate the recommendation by that comment. I respect the trainers of today like I respected my trainers.

in a post above the poster stated an M1 manual from 1965 specified grease on an M1. I found that strange because the M1 was officially replaced by the M14 in 1959. I could not imagine the Military printing a manual in for it six years later.

As I pointed out previously the Military is replacing CLP (oil) with Dry lube for the M16 and it variants. No grease, but you can find civilian rifle trainers saying to
use grease. I stick with MilDpecs

I till see no reason to grease a pistol. I use CLP and will not study using dry lube.
I'll check into that.

Everything I've ever seen or learned about lubing a M1 or M14 has always involved grease.

My son is currently an active duty Marine, and told me they are using CLP on their M16s.

Based on the contact points and wear areas on the M-rifles, I would think grease would be the better lube - but I'm going to look into it. My information has come from competitors and well-known builders of M14s - most of them former military.

As far as grease on a pistol goes, a moving slide or bolt doesn't know or care if it's on a rifle or pistol. Grease just stays put where you want/need it better than oil.

Lubing for adverse weather conditions or dirt/sand is another story.
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Old 09-11-2019, 06:01 PM   #18
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From the Army's 1940 manual for the M1911 pistol:
5. GENERAL.
a. Careful, conscientious work is required to keep automatic pistols in a condition that will insure perfect functioning of the mechanism and continued accuracy of the barrel. It is essential that the entire mechanism is kept cleaned and oiled to avoid jams.
b. The mechanism also requires care to prevent rust or an accumulation of sand or dirt in the interior. Pistols are easily disassembled for cleaning and oiling.
6. CARE AND CLEANING.
a. Care and cleaning of the pistol include the ordinary case of the pistol to preserve its condition and appearance in garrisons, posts, and camps, and in campaign.
b. Damp air and sweaty hands are great promoters of rust. The pistols should be cleaned and protected after every drill or handling. Special precautions are necessary when the pistols have been used on rainy days and after tours of guard duty.
c. To clean the pistol rub it with a rag which has been lightly oiled and then clean with a perfectly dry rag. Swab the bore with an oily flannel patch and then with a perfectly dry one. Dust out all crevices with a small, clean brush.
d. Immediately after cleaning, to protect the pistol swab the bore thoroughly with a flannel patch saturated with sperm oil, wipe over all metal parts with an oily rag, applying a few drops of light oil (sperm oil) to all cams and working surfaces of the mechanism.
e. After cleaning and protecting the pistol, place it in the pistol rack without any covering whatever. The use of canvas or similar covers is prohibited, as they collect moisture and rust the metal parts. While barracks are being swept, pistol racks will be covered with a piece of canvas to protect the pistols from dust.
7. CARE AND CLEANING AFTER FIRING.
a. When a pistol has been fired the bore will be cleaned thoroughly not later than the evening of the day on which it is fired. Thereafter it will be cleaned and oiled each day for at least the next three succeeding days.
b. To clean the bore after firing, first remove the slide and barrel, insert the muzzle of the barrel in a vessel containing hot water and issue soap, hot water alone, or cold water; the cleaning rod with a cloth patch assembled is inserted in the breech and moved forward and back for about 1 minute, pumping the water in and out of the bore. When the bore is wet, a brass or bronze wire brush, if available, should be run all the way through the bore, then all the way back three or four times. Water should again be pumped through the bore. Then wipe the cleaning rod dry, remove the barrel from the water, and using dry, clean flannel patches thoroughly swab the bore until it is perfectly dry and clean. Examine the bore carefully for metal fouling. After firing do not oil the bore before cleaning.
c. Saturate a clean flannel patch with sperm oil and swab the bore and chamber with the patch, making certain that the bore and all metal parts of the pistol are covered with a thin coat of oil.
8. RULES FOR CARE OF PISTOL ON THE RANGE.
a. Always clean at the end of each day's shooting. A pistol that has been fired should not be left over night without cleaning.
b. Never fire a pistol with any dust, dirt, mud, or snow in the bore.
c. Before loading, the pistol make sure that no patch, rag, or other object has been left in the barrel.
d. During range firing a noncommissioned officer will be placed in charge of the cleaning of pistols in the cleaning racks.
9. CARE DURING COLD WEATHER. Use oil sparingly on the working parts.
10. CARE DURING GAS ATTACKS.
a. Pistols should be cleaned as soon as possible after a gas attack.
b. Oil will prevent corrosion for about 12 hours.
c. Clean all parts in boiling water containing a little soda, if available.
d. All traces of gas must be removed from ammunition with a slightly oiled rag; then thoroughly dry the ammunition.
e. Rust-preventive compound resists gas corrosion more than light oil. In many exposures, especially those of long duration, ammunition treated with sperm oil evidences more severe corrosion than unprotected cartridges.
11. IMPORTANT POINTS To BE OBSERVED.
a. After firing the pistol, never leave it uncleaned over night. The damage done is then irreparable.
b. Keep the pistol clean and lightly lubricated, but do not let it become gummy with oil.
c. Do not place the pistol on the ground where sand or dirt may enter the bore or mechanism.
d. Do not plug the muzzle of the pistol with a patch or plug. One may forget to remove it before firing, in which case the discharge may bulge or burst the barrel at the muzzle.
e. A pistol kept in a leather holster may rust due to moisture absorbed by the leather from the atmosphere, even though the holster may appear to be perfectly dry. If the holster is wet and the pistol must be carried therein, cover the pistol with a thick coat of oil. The hammer should not be snapped when the pistol is partially disassembled.
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Last edited by DE Pistole; 09-11-2019 at 06:17 PM.
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Old 09-11-2019, 06:19 PM   #19
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Ain't coming no water, soap or sperm oil into contact with any of my guns iffen I can help it :P
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Old 09-11-2019, 06:36 PM   #20
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For anyone still following along on the Great Grease Debate (tangent...) concerning M1s and M14s, here's what I've found -

In the Army's Technical manual TM9-1005-223-12 for the M14, dated January 1963, it states on page 23

Section II. Lubrication, "a. Usual Conditions. Apply a light coat of rifle grease lubriplate 130A to the following surfaces:" and it lists parts of the bolt, bolt guides, groves, roller, etc.

Scott Duff's The M1 Garand: OWNER'S GUIDE states on page 99 -

"Basically, any metal to metal contact areas on the receiver, bolt, operating rod, , and hammer areas should receive a light coating of grease." And also states "The important point is to use some type of grease, not oil."

That all agrees with what I've been taught.

I feel using grease on the rails of a pistol makes it cycle smoother and doesn't attract any more or less dirt than oil while lubricating better, but that's just my opinion.
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Last edited by jkv45; 09-11-2019 at 08:02 PM.
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