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Old 01-17-2020, 12:59 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by 5Wire View Post
Best options, as on the HK P7 family, seem to be to run the piston/cylinder dry or use a dry Teflon (PTFE) which is what I do with Elmer's Slide-All (inexpensive). Some carbon on the rings is unavoidable but does help make a better compression seal—like piston rings in an engine. If you see carbon deposits on more than two or three rings (three on a P7), it's probably time to have the piston replaced. Clean but don't scrub, then dry or dry lube, is my advice.

https://www.hardwareworld.com/files/pi/lK/S/7OAK.jpg

https://www.hardwareworld.com/p7oakk...hoC5MYQAvD_BwE
Dry lube is an excellent idea. I never thought of that.
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Old 01-18-2020, 03:11 AM   #22
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Dry lube is an excellent idea. I never thought of that.
I use it in all the hot spots while avoiding using fluid lubes or grease in those locations. PTFE/Teflon tends to bond with metals under high temperature. I was told this by an engineer friend working in the manufacture of high-temp, multi-zone reflow ovens. So what eventually evolves is sort Teflon to Teflon contact with the piston and cylinder.

I tumbled to the concept about 14 years ago and gave up testing to find any carbon–using the HK scraper and brush–in either my P7M8 or P7M13 after about 1500 rounds between them without cleaning either. With fluid lubes I had to clean after 50—100 rounds or the actions would slow and eventually freeze.

I gave up the test because I felt guilty for not cleaning.

I use the same procedure on all my firearms. No problems.
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Old 01-19-2020, 06:01 PM   #23
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I've been using dry, powdered gun grade moly on P22s (zinc slide and frame) and it stops all wear. I apply it with a Q Tip. A little bit last a long, long time. It too is dry, dark grey in color and won't build up. I'm doubtful about it increasing the compression....very thin. I had suggested a long time ago that someone clean all of the oil and grease out of the disconnector and sear shaft on the CCP and try powdered moly as a lubricant. These dry lubes don't attract or hold dirt and debris. And they are very slick. 1917
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Old 01-19-2020, 07:04 PM   #24
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I've been using dry, powdered gun grade moly...
Never before heard of the stuff! Thanks, just placed an order.


I'll probably try it first on bolt faces and firing pin channels as I already know the Teflon/PTFE thing has worked well on my P7s and CCP.


The moly does look to be a simpler thing. Cool!
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Old 01-20-2020, 09:23 AM   #25
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5Wire, moly is nothing new. Some target shooter tumble their projectiles in it. It is easily removed by any regular manner of cleaning. When I lube with it, I dip the end of a Q Tip in it. Shake off some of the extra and then rub the tip on the area where I want it deposited. It leaves a shine similar to what you might expect if you were using graphite. You cannot make it pile up...only a thin coat but as advertised it does seem to set up a coating on each surface that actually stops metal to metal contact. It is also used in grease which can be purchased at any auto store. From what I read it is not a good compression lubricant, ex. roller bearings but works best for parts that slide against something.

Years ago I purchased a new P22, took careful measurements of areas prone to wear. Frame rails, side grooves for example. After 30,000 rounds there was no measurable wear according to my caliper. Pretty impressive since I wore out the same in 9,000 rounds with oil and grease in an earlier pistol. Only 1/8" of metal is touching between the slide and frame when the slide if rearward yet the hammer is still pressing the slide upward with full pressure. KG lubricants is a source and I've read of people mixing moly and dry teflon. How good is it at lubricating....I don't know but I have cleaned and then fired 3,000 rounds of .22 ammo through a P22 at one sitting several times. No cleaning or further lubricating while shooting. If you do something like that ... you need loaders because your thumbs will get pretty sore. 1917

I should add this is a dry powder, not a spray on or liquid mix. I have not had good luck with spray on stuff.
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Old 01-20-2020, 01:03 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by 1917-1911M View Post
I've been using dry, powdered gun grade moly on P22s (zinc slide and frame) and it stops all wear. I apply it with a Q Tip. A little bit last a long, long time. It too is dry, dark grey in color and won't build up. I'm doubtful about it increasing the compression....very thin. I had suggested a long time ago that someone clean all of the oil and grease out of the disconnector and sear shaft on the CCP and try powdered moly as a lubricant. These dry lubes don't attract or hold dirt and debris. And they are very slick. 1917
How does the dry lube do for protecting against corrosion?
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Old 01-20-2020, 07:07 PM   #27
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I doubt it is of any benefit in preventing rust or corrosion. It will cover the area where you apply it but if that provides any rust protection I'm unaware of it. . Graphite attracts moisture. Moly doesn't. I don't really see any rust on any of my recent firearms. Keep em away from salt and moisture and they seem to do ok. I have one of the plug in dry sticks in the safe. Not much to rust on a P22 and most of these new pistols have a lot of polymer and pretty tough, corrosion resistant finishes to the slide. 1917
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Old 01-21-2020, 12:20 AM   #28
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5Wire, moly is nothing new.
Powdered gun grade moly is new to me. Thanks again.
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Old 01-23-2020, 07:01 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by 1917-1911M View Post
I've been using dry, powdered gun grade moly on P22s (zinc slide and frame) and it stops all wear. I apply it with a Q Tip. A little bit last a long, long time. It too is dry, dark grey in color and won't build up. I'm doubtful about it increasing the compression....very thin. I had suggested a long time ago that someone clean all of the oil and grease out of the disconnector and sear shaft on the CCP and try powdered moly as a lubricant. These dry lubes don't attract or hold dirt and debris. And they are very slick. 1917
I may do a run using only dry lube on all parts. I will let you know how it goes on my ccp m2.
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Old 01-29-2020, 08:08 PM   #30
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I wonder if that increases carbon build up on the piston? I was told to lubricate everything but the piston. I use bore cleaner with a tooth brush and the wire brush that comes with the pistol. It usually does well at removing carbon build up on the piston. I also clean the piston chamber with cotton patches soaked in Hoppes #9. I think failing to clean both of those parts properly is why so many people have issues.
Best options, as on the HK P7 family, seem to be to run the piston/cylinder dry or use a dry Teflon (PTFE) which is what I do with Elmer's Slide-All (inexpensive). Some carbon on the rings is unavoidable but does help make a better compression seal—like piston rings in an engine. If you see carbon deposits on more than two or three rings (three on a P7), it's probably time to have the piston replaced. Clean but don't scrub, then dry or dry lube, is my advice.

https://www.hardwareworld.com/files/pi/lK/S/7OAK.jpg

https://www.hardwareworld.com/p7oakk...hoC5MYQAvD_BwE
So you use slide all even though it is flammable?
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