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Old 09-23-2011, 03:54 PM   #1
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bigman .22
Muzzle Flip / Recoil for a PPQ

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I havent been able to fire a live round out of the PPQ and likely wont find a range with the gun for rent. I am interested in a .40 S&W, can you answer 2 questions for me?

1. What is the muzzle flip and recoil like in the PPQ .40
2. Can you buy any aftermarket parts to reduce the recoil ?
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Old 09-23-2011, 04:16 PM   #2
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Grey40 .22
I'll give you my impression... recoil can be subjective, so standard disclaimers about YMMV, etc, apply. I used to have a Glock 23, which I sold to get the PPQ .40S&W. The PPQ has a bit more muzzle flip than my Glock 23. That said, it isn't uncomfortable at all to shoot. I find that if I concentrate a bit more on my grip (make sure I'm doing a firm push-pull, for example), I can keep muzzle flip well under control. If you've shot .40S&W before nothing about the recoil should surprise you. I have no buyer's remorse. Another thing that helps with all shooting, not just .40S&W, is to exercise your grip. It may sound silly, but I bought a pair of the cheap grip exercisers at Wal-Mart (you know the ones: two handles with a spring joining the ends) and keep one in my car. Every 2-3 days as I drive to work in the morning I'll do 3-4 sets of 50 on each hand, only takes a few minutes.
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Old 09-23-2011, 04:26 PM   #3
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Grey40 .22
Also, you asked about recoil reduction options. The only one I know of is the DPM Systems recoil rod. They have it for the P99 but Walther told me the P99 and PPQ share the same recoil spring assembly. I can't comment on any reliability concerns surrounding this recoil rod; if it were me, I'd use it at the range only and swap the factory rod back in after cleaning.
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Old 09-23-2011, 05:54 PM   #4
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grumpy1 .22
My son has the Walther P99 AS in .40 so I am sure the comparison to the PPQ will be very similar.

While I really like the P99 AS I find that in .40 it has very noticeable recoil and myself I would get the 9MM. By comparison my SIG P229 in .40 the recoil is not that bothersome at all but it is a heavier pistol.

I personally am NOT s fan of any third party recoil reduction devices as they possibly could reduce reliability or life of the firearm according to many comments on the subject made by firearms expert Bruce Gray of Grayguns fame.

Grayguns by Bruce Gray
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Old 09-24-2011, 02:17 AM   #5
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BPman .22
IMO, if a person is recoil sensitive at all then they would be better served with a 9mm no matter what the platform, plus the 9 is cheaper to shoot as well. With good modern self defense rounds there isn't a nickel's worth of difference between the two in their ability to incapacitate bad people.


FWIW, I used to think that my PPQ recoiled more than my Gen4 G19, however one day I shot them side by side with the same ammo and could really not tell any difference. Then again, I am fortunate in that recoil doesn't bother me that much as I am too busy concentrating on getting back on target + I have shot my 9mm PPQ a lot (circa 6K since July) and am familiar & comfortable with it. Perhaps it's purely psycho-somatic but I can now discern no measurable difference.
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Old 09-24-2011, 08:00 AM   #6
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bigman .22
Thanks

Thanks for the replies. I have other 40's and like them, the only gun I havent bought due to recoil is the Glock 23. For whatever reason Glocks are so snappy I haven't enjoyed shooting them. As long as the PPQ isn't "snappy" sounds like I will be fine
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Old 09-24-2011, 08:35 AM   #7
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ozy .22
by comparison, i felt that my now sold hkp30 had a slighlty heavier hand in recoil, when compard to the PPQ,both in 9mm.fwiw.
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Old 09-25-2011, 03:24 AM   #8
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Muzzle flip (torque) is a function of force (slide mass multiplied by slide velocity), multiplied by the lever arm (distance between the slide's center of mass to the axis of rotation, which is basically the centerline of your wrist). The PPQ has a high bore axis combined with a relatively low grip, so the lever arm is quite long compared to guns like the Glock and Steyr. The reason Walther tapered the top of the slide on the P99/PPQ is to minimize one component of torque (slide mass), and also to lower the slide's center of mass to reduce the length of the lever arm.

The amount of applied torque isn't going to change too much no matter what you do. A dual-spring recoil system might help a little, but reliability might suffer as a result - not something I'm willing to accept in a carry gun.

Using a firmer grip will help, as well as increasing friction in certain areas on the grip surface. My answer was to stipple a small area on the front strap, sort of like the checkering you see on higher end 1911s. It helps lock the gun in place while firing and allows my hand and wrist to absorb the recoil.

Last edited by carbofan21; 09-25-2011 at 04:10 AM.
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Old 09-25-2011, 03:10 PM   #9
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balance .22
1. I had a .40 cal P99 some years ago, and it seemed to kick more than most other .40 cal pistols that I had tried until then.

2. I have heard of people trying both Sprinco and DPM recoil reducers on the P99.

Sprinco USA -- Recoil Reducers
DPM System Technologies Ltd.

I remember reading about people who had issues with the Sprinco dual recoil spring causing the pistol to go out of battery very easily since it took very little pressure to move the slide back with the Sprinco dual recoil spring installed.

The DPM recoil reducer seems to have a better reputation, though people still question whether this will reduce reliability with the pistol. I would agree that if the .40 is too uncomfortable for you stock, then either get the 9mm version, or get another pistol.
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Old 10-28-2011, 03:40 AM   #10
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Maksim .22
Have shot a P99 in 40 cal, and the recoil was a tad more. Personally, I prefer 40 cal in proper metal guns, such as CZ's and Tanfoglios.

The only way to battle it is to learn the recoil impulse, grip the gun properly, or better yet, reload your own ammo. You can load 40 cal in full power variety, such as most commercial loads, or you can load 40 cal to be a powder puff load. =)
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